70% of American investors wish they’d handled money differently in 2019 — here’s their No. 1 regret

In 2019, seven out of 10 (70%) American investors experienced some form of regret when it came to their investment strategy — with 35% saying they wish they’d invested more in the past year. Not putting away more money isn’t the only reason people are kicking themselves over their 2019 investing decisions. Another 16% say they wish they’d invested more aggressively, followed by 15% who wish they’d made more trades in 2019. If you, like more than a third of Nerdwallet’s survey participants, also


In 2019, seven out of 10 (70%) American investors experienced some form of regret when it came to their investment strategy — with 35% saying they wish they’d invested more in the past year.
Not putting away more money isn’t the only reason people are kicking themselves over their 2019 investing decisions.
Another 16% say they wish they’d invested more aggressively, followed by 15% who wish they’d made more trades in 2019.
If you, like more than a third of Nerdwallet’s survey participants, also
70% of American investors wish they’d handled money differently in 2019 — here’s their No. 1 regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, invest, market, savings, wish, 2019, money, regret, handled, investors, heres, american, lee, financial, differently, theyd, aggressive


70% of American investors wish they'd handled money differently in 2019 — here's their No. 1 regret

In 2019, seven out of 10 (70%) American investors experienced some form of regret when it came to their investment strategy — with 35% saying they wish they’d invested more in the past year. That’s according to a recent Nerdwallet survey, which polled 2,018 U.S. adults, ages 18 and older, among whom 1,235 have money in investment accounts. In this case, an “investor” refers to anyone who’s saving money that’s exposed to the stock market, even if that’s through a retirement plan, such as a 401(k). Not putting away more money isn’t the only reason people are kicking themselves over their 2019 investing decisions. Another 16% say they wish they’d invested more aggressively, followed by 15% who wish they’d made more trades in 2019.

If you, like more than a third of Nerdwallet’s survey participants, also feel regret over not putting away more money in 2019, experts say you shouldn’t be so hard on yourself. While growing your investments is a worthy goal, you can always use 2019 “as your motivation to do a better job in 2020,” says Douglas Boneparth, president and founder of Bone Fide Wealth. “It’s not what you didn’t do. It’s what you are going to do about it now.” Malik S. Lee, an Atlanta-based certified financial planner at Felton and Peel, agrees. Lee says you “shouldn’t beat yourself up over chasing returns or trying to time the market.” These traits “are great attributes if you like to gamble, not if you are a sound investor,” he adds.

How much should you be investing?

Experts say that deciding how much to invest is a highly individualized process. “The answer to this question differs for everyone. I think one should focus more on their overall savings rate. What percentage of that they should invest, depends on their personal goals and risk tolerance,” says Lee. When Lee refers to your “savings rate,” he’s talking about all savings in general. “This includes cash reserves, retirement plans and after-tax brokerage accounts,” Lee says.

“You shouldn’t invest in the market without first putting money aside for retirement and already have an emergency savings established” Ryan Marshall A New Jersey-based certified financial planner

When you’re in your 20s and 30s, you ideally want to start out with a savings ratio of 10% to 15% of your gross income and work your way up, Lee explains. Of that 10% to 15%, you can decide how and where to save and invest it. “You shouldn’t invest in the market without first putting money aside for retirement and already have an emergency savings established,” Ryan Marshall, a New Jersey-based certified financial planner, tells CNBC Make It. While many advisors recommend saving at least 10% of your income for retirement, Marshall argues you should aim for 15%. “This 15% is based on your gross income, and so, if you make a $100,000 salary, you should invest at least 15% or $15,000 per year,” he says.

Aggressive investing: How to know if it’s right for you

Although 16% of participants wished they were more aggressive in their investing in 2019, experts say making overly bold money moves isn’t for everyone — and has a lot to do with your risk tolerance and financial circumstances. “If someone wants to be more aggressive, they should understand the potential downside,” Marshall says. “There is no unicorn perfect investment out there. Each investment has an upside and downside. Investors need to understand what the downside of an aggressive portfolio looks like.” One way to figure out how aggressive you should be with your investments is “to complete a risk assessment questionnaire that will ask a series of questions to determine how you will react in a market downturn,” says Lee. To test yourself, here’s an investor profile quiz offered by brokerage firm Charles Schwab. Second, you can determine how “risky” your portfolio should be based on your future cash flow needs, or how much money you’ll need to get by, Lee explains. To determine your cash flow needs, Lee recommends sitting down with a financial advisor, who can help you to develop a comprehensive plan or cash-flow projection for the next five to 10 years. Based on this cash-flow projection, you can decide whether you feel secure about your financial future and whether you’re ready to get more aggressive with your investments, Lee says. Finally, you should also consider how much time you have to reach whatever goal it is you’re investing toward, Boneparth explains: “Typically, the longer the time frame, the more aggressive you can afford to be with your investments. However, personal risk tolerances should also be taken into account.”

To trade or not to trade? A common investor question


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-28  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retirement, invest, market, savings, wish, 2019, money, regret, handled, investors, heres, american, lee, financial, differently, theyd, aggressive


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Jim Cramer: 12 gifts I want the stock market to deliver in 2020

With Christmas and Hanukkah nigh, CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday outlined a wish list that he hopes the market will deliver investors in the new year. Six more trading days remain in 2019, and the “Mad Money” host deemed it a “fantastic year,” in which the Dow Jones Industrial Average has climbed almost 22%, the S&P 500 has expanded 28.50% and the Nasdaq Composite has rallied 34.51%. He expects more to come. “That’s why I’m going to give you the list … of a dozen presents I’m hoping for, because


With Christmas and Hanukkah nigh, CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday outlined a wish list that he hopes the market will deliver investors in the new year.
Six more trading days remain in 2019, and the “Mad Money” host deemed it a “fantastic year,” in which the Dow Jones Industrial Average has climbed almost 22%, the S&P 500 has expanded 28.50% and the Nasdaq Composite has rallied 34.51%.
He expects more to come.
“That’s why I’m going to give you the list … of a dozen presents I’m hoping for, because
Jim Cramer: 12 gifts I want the stock market to deliver in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gifts, christmas, true, presents, days, jim, list, market, deliver, yearsix, cramer, 2020, wish, stock


Jim Cramer: 12 gifts I want the stock market to deliver in 2020

With Christmas and Hanukkah nigh, CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Friday outlined a wish list that he hopes the market will deliver investors in the new year.

Six more trading days remain in 2019, and the “Mad Money” host deemed it a “fantastic year,” in which the Dow Jones Industrial Average has climbed almost 22%, the S&P 500 has expanded 28.50% and the Nasdaq Composite has rallied 34.51%.

He expects more to come.

“That’s why I’m going to give you the list … of a dozen presents I’m hoping for, because there are, after all, 12 days of Christmas and I want my true love, the market, to give them all to me,” Cramer said. “These are all a bit oddball and some [are] sappy, but I mean them, and I want you to have these presents, too.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-20  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gifts, christmas, true, presents, days, jim, list, market, deliver, yearsix, cramer, 2020, wish, stock


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Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats’ election victory

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China. Stand with Hong Kong!” Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.” On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of C


Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.
Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China.
Stand with Hong Kong!”
Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.”
On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of C
Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats’ election victory Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yelled, china, biggest, sees, hong, election, democrats, wish, chinese, city, demonstrators, victory, protests, protesters, prodemocracy, kong


Hong Kong sees biggest protests since democrats' election victory

Pro-democracy protesters march on a street as they take part in a demonstration on December 8, 2019 in Hong Kong, China.

Vast crowds of black-clad demonstrators thronged Hong Kong on Sunday in the largest anti-government protests since local elections last month that boosted the pro-democracy movement seeking to curb controls by China.

It was the first time since August that the Civil Human Rights Front – organizer of million-strong marches earlier in the year that paralyzed the Asian finance center – had received authorities’ permission for a rally.

It estimated turnout of 800,000 while police said 183,000.

Chants of “Fight for freedom! Stand with Hong Kong!” echoed as demonstrators, from students to professionals and the elderly, marched from Victoria Park in the bustling shopping district toward the financial area.

As dark fell, some protesters spray-painted anti-Beijing graffiti on a Bank of China building. Riot police stood on guard, restrained as protesters yelled “dogs” and “cockroaches.”

The former British colony of 7.4 million people reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. It is governed under a “One Country, Two Systems” formula guaranteeing freedoms not allowed in mainland China, but many fear Beijing is tightening the screws.

“It’s Christmas time soon but we’re not in the mood to celebrate anymore,” said Lawrence, a 23-year-old student.

He held a poster saying: “My 2020 wish is universal suffrage,” a reference to demands for an open vote on the city leader, currently the unpopular Beijing-backed Carrie Lam.

China blames the six months of unrest on interference by foreign governments including the United States and Britain.

On Saturday, two leaders of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong were denied entry to the neighboring Chinese city of Macau, without explanation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yelled, china, biggest, sees, hong, election, democrats, wish, chinese, city, demonstrators, victory, protests, protesters, prodemocracy, kong


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What Jay Leno, Tony Hawk and 8 other successful millionaires wish they knew in their 20s

We asked Jay Leno, Tony Hawk, Barbara Corcoran and seven other Advisors in The Oracles what they would wish they knew in their 20s. —Jay Leno, one of the world’s most successful comedians, star of “Jay Leno’s Garage” on CNBC, and former longtime host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” “Don’t stop playing the violin or doing Frontside 540s. —Tony Hawk, founder and CEO of Birdhouse Skateboards and president of the Tony Hawk Foundation3. —Dan Lok, serial entrepreneur, global educator, international bests


We asked Jay Leno, Tony Hawk, Barbara Corcoran and seven other Advisors in The Oracles what they would wish they knew in their 20s.
—Jay Leno, one of the world’s most successful comedians, star of “Jay Leno’s Garage” on CNBC, and former longtime host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.”
“Don’t stop playing the violin or doing Frontside 540s.
—Tony Hawk, founder and CEO of Birdhouse Skateboards and president of the Tony Hawk Foundation3.
—Dan Lok, serial entrepreneur, global educator, international bests
What Jay Leno, Tony Hawk and 8 other successful millionaires wish they knew in their 20s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stop, wish, things, company, knew, hawk, founder, life, tony, youll, millionaires, tell, successful, 20s, dont, ceo, leno, jay, learn


What Jay Leno, Tony Hawk and 8 other successful millionaires wish they knew in their 20s

Have you ever wished you could go back in time and give your younger self advice? Time travel may not be possible, but the next best thing is learning from others. We asked Jay Leno, Tony Hawk, Barbara Corcoran and seven other Advisors in The Oracles what they would wish they knew in their 20s.

1. ‘Mistakes are okay.’

“I made some stupid decisions growing up, but I probably wouldn’t be as successful if I hadn’t made them. So I would tell my younger self that mistakes are OK, as long as you learn from them. Some things you just have to learn for yourself. You can tell people like me not to touch a hot stove, but we’ll still do it. Given a chance, I’d probably touch it again — because that’s how you learn. Today every kid gets a trophy regardless of how they place, but that’s not how it should be. Because I was dyslexic, my mother told me that I would have to work twice as hard as other kids to get the same things. So I went through life with that attitude. I came in a little earlier and went home a little later, and it always paid off.” —Jay Leno, one of the world’s most successful comedians, star of “Jay Leno’s Garage” on CNBC, and former longtime host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” Follow him on Facebook and Instagram

2. ‘Savor the ride.’

“Don’t stop playing the violin or doing Frontside 540s. Embrace adversity. Enjoy your travels to strange places. Tell your kids you love them more often. Eat less meat. Go to that Joe Strummer show, because it will be your last chance. Be more honest about your feelings. Don’t start a high-end denim company. Save all of your Hi8 video footage. Don’t do a loop while wearing a monkey costume. Invest in Uber instead of that burger place. Surf more. Don’t chase fame. Savor the quiet moments. Learn laser flips and to speak French properly.” Believe in yourself more, and enjoy the ride. —Tony Hawk, founder and CEO of Birdhouse Skateboards and president of the Tony Hawk Foundation

3. ‘Use self-doubt to your advantage.’

“I would want to tell my younger self that self-doubt can sometimes be a good thing. Self-doubt is something I struggled with daily. Growing up, I had a hard time learning to read and write, so I was labeled ‘the dumb kid.’ I let that get me down and diminish my confidence, so much so that when my boyfriend dumped me and said, ‘You’ll never succeed without me,’ I almost believed him. Almost. Today, I use insecurity as a motivator to learn and try harder. I am my biggest cheerleader. The moment that insecurity starts to creep in, I remind myself: ‘Barbara, you’re amazing.'” —Barbara Corcoran, founder of The Corcoran Group, podcast host of “Business Unusual,” and Shark on “Shark Tank”

4. ‘Focus on the long term.’

“My advice for young people is this: Don’t focus on your weaknesses; focus on what you’re naturally good at, which you’ll likely enjoy. If you don’t know what that is, try more things. Then develop that skill, and the market will compensate you for it. Think long-term. Identify a person or company to learn from and work for the skills, not the paycheck. In my early 20s, I worked for next to nothing for my mentor. But I call that my ‘million-dollar year’ because that’s the value of the education I received. I spent the first five years of my career working long hours and living with my mom. And I never took a vacation. Success takes hard work and time, but you have time. The question is, are you willing to work hard? Identify where you want to go and who you need to be to get there. Then reverse-engineer a plan.” —Dan Lok, serial entrepreneur, global educator, international bestselling author of “Unlock It!,” founder and CEO of Closers.com and Copywriters.com. Follow him on YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram

5. ‘Stop thinking small and stop complaining.’

“There are two things I’d tell my 20-something self: 1. Stop thinking so small. No matter how big you think you can grow your current project or company, multiply those thoughts by 20. Don’t think about what you don’t have; map out exactly what it would take to make that goal a reality. Remember, there’s no shortage of available money, and the right deal will always find the funding. Most investors will pass on a deal that seems too small and without colossal upside. So don’t be afraid to dream bigger and sell the deal larger! 2. Stop complaining so much. No one wants to hear you whine. No one cares about your losses, bad partnerships, rip-offs, or screw-overs. Suck it up, regroup, sell through it, and be fearlessly committed to your goals without complaining about the bumps and bruises that come with the territory.” —Matt Mead, founder and CEO at Drivonic; co-founder of Mead Holdings Group, The Epek Companies, and Grayson Pierce Capital

6. ‘Be yourself. Always.’

“I wish I’d known sooner to go all-in on being myself, unapologetically. All of me, not the version that’s filtered, edited, appropriately professional, properly feminine and pretty — or properly anything, for that matter. In the end, you will give in to being you. You can wait if you like, but what you feel inside — about who you really are and what your life is meant to be about — is not going away. A year from now, it will still be there; you’ll just be older. So rip off the band-aid now.” —Katrina Ruth, founder and CEO of “The Katrina Ruth Show,” a multimillion-dollar online coaching business for entrepreneurs. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube

7. ‘Don’t regret your choices.’

“I’d tell myself to never regret the choices I make. Sure, it would be easy to say, ‘I wish I would have started my company sooner, bought Amazon stock when I first heard about it, and continued the podcast I started in 2007 instead of switching to YouTube.’ But the truth is, I am where I am today because of the choices I made. I own that. I don’t do regret anymore, and I don’t believe in suffering from addiction to the past. I’m here now and I’m always committed to what’s next.” —Tom Ferry, founder and CEO of Tom Ferry International and New York Times bestselling author of “Life! By Design”; ranked the No. 1 real estate coach by Swanepoel Power 200. Follow him on Instagram and Facebook

8. ‘Prepare to lose.’

“You can’t save your way to wealth or cut costs to become more profitable. You have to spend money to grow it. Most entrepreneurs focus on their return on investment rather than what they need to spend to reach their goals — and what they might have to lose along the way. This ‘acceptable loss’ is an important term I learned in the military, and one of the most difficult decisions a business owner faces. It’s about identifying what you’re prepared to lose to accomplish your goal and taking calculated risks to get there. Like most entrepreneurs, I originally got into business for myself to make money. But I’ve also learned that if you help people, money just comes as a byproduct. So create your company to make an impact or reach a massive audience for a cause, which is what I’ve done with every one of my businesses.” —Patch Baker, founder and CEO of Mobius Media Solutions; former U.S. Marine, with a mission to help people leave the military today and not feel abandoned tomorrow

9. ‘Prioritize your health and relationships.’

“Trust your instincts. Life will get tough — and so will you. You’ll feel broken sometimes, but it’s just the beginning. Embrace the lessons from hurt and failure, and always get back up. Do the self-work and have a growth mindset. Lose your ego and inhibition. Forgive everyone for everything, always — especially yourself. You’ll find your voice, happiness, and choice; then you’ll help others do the same. Respect your fear and work through it. You’ll impact millions of lives; so unapologetically own your contribution and your story. Stop making excuses. Integrity and honesty are everything, so be true to yourself. Love those close to you. Your health and relationships are the most important things in life, so get your priorities straight! Learn the art of self-care, and love yourself as if your life depends on it — because it does. Sing every day. Learn to sleep. Always be a student. Stop wasting time worrying. Focus. Think, dream, and do big things.” —Andrea Callanan, musician-turned-entrepreneur; voice, confidence, and success coach, author of “You Are Meant for More,” and founder of employee engagement company Inspire Me. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter

10. ‘Be your own champion.’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stop, wish, things, company, knew, hawk, founder, life, tony, youll, millionaires, tell, successful, 20s, dont, ceo, leno, jay, learn


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What’s on kids’ wish lists? Here are 12 of the hottest toys for the holidays

evgenyatamanenko | iStock | Getty ImagesThe holiday season is fast approaching, and toys are already flying off the shelves. Thames & KosmosSTEM (science, technology, engineering and math) toys remain popular with kids and parents. WowWeeThe earworm that kids can’t stop singing has been transformed into dozens of toys for the holidays. Lego Hidden Side Graveyard MysteryPrice: $29.99A unique play experience that combines the open creative play of LEGO building toys for kids with an augmented real


evgenyatamanenko | iStock | Getty ImagesThe holiday season is fast approaching, and toys are already flying off the shelves.
Thames & KosmosSTEM (science, technology, engineering and math) toys remain popular with kids and parents.
WowWeeThe earworm that kids can’t stop singing has been transformed into dozens of toys for the holidays.
Lego Hidden Side Graveyard MysteryPrice: $29.99A unique play experience that combines the open creative play of LEGO building toys for kids with an augmented real
What’s on kids’ wish lists? Here are 12 of the hottest toys for the holidays Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whats, toys, christmas, toy, surprise, baby, holiday, sounds, kids, holidays, play, hottest, wars, lists, wish


What's on kids' wish lists? Here are 12 of the hottest toys for the holidays

Parents and children open presents on Christmas morning. evgenyatamanenko | iStock | Getty Images

The holiday season is fast approaching, and toys are already flying off the shelves. The toy industry is poised for growth this year as it faces weak comparisons with last year’s holiday season, which was the first without Toys R Us. The closing of the toy retailer hurt sales last year, because parents stocked up on toys at liquidation sales earlier in the year. This year, parents will want to plan carefully because there are six fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas, something that hasn’t happened since 2013. According to the NPD Group, there was a surge in sales during the final week before Christmas during that shortened season six years ago. “We should expect the same levels of growth this year during the week of Christmas; and with the online channel becoming less of an option as we get closer to Christmas day, it’s a great opportunity for brick and mortar stores to gain share,” Juli Lennett, vice president and industry advisor at The NPD Group, said in a report last week. “Retailers need to have the inventory on shelves through Christmas Eve or risk losing out on this last minute rush.” A lot is riding on the next few weeks, since toy sales have fallen 5.5% year to date. Lennett expects a strong fourth quarter because momentum has improved. The third quarter saw a 3% bump in sales, buoyed by purchases of L.O.L. Surprise packs, Marvel toys, Barbie dolls and Nerf blasters. Licensed toys, in particular, are outpacing industry growth, seeing a 5% bump in the most recent period. Fortnite, Pokemon, Baby Shark and entertainment properties such as Marvel and “Toy Story” were among the top-selling items. “The upcoming movie releases of ‘Frozen 2’ and ‘Star Wars’ will be an additional growth driver this holiday season as consumers buy toys that relate to those films,” Lennett said. Here’s a closer look at the hottest toys this 2019 holiday season:

Disney ‘Frozen’ Ultimate Arendelle Castle Playset

Price: $199

The ultimate Arendelle castle Playset is 5 feet tall, 4 feet wide with 2 sides of folding gates and 4 floors including a lookout tower. Hasbro

“Frozen II” is now out in theaters, and it’s destined to be one of the few things kids will talk about until the holidays — and well beyond. There are hundreds of different “Frozen”-inspired toys on shelves, ranging from plush and dolls to mini-figures and Funko Pops. The Ultimate Arendelle Castle Playset stands over five feet tall and has four floors with seven different rooms, including a kitchen, music room and throne room. While the set does not come with the Anna and Elsa dolls, it does have several accessories. The playset comes with items such as a piano, throne, banquet table, sofa and vanity. It also has a button on the top of the tower that starts a colorful light show.

My Robotic Pet: Tumbling Hedgehog

Price: $39.95

My Robotic Pet: Tumbling Hedgehog is a STEM experiment kit from Thames & Kosmos. Thames & Kosmos

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) toys remain popular with kids and parents. The Tumbling Hedgehog from Thames & Kosmos is a 172-piece kit. When it’s put together, kids will have their very own robotic hedgehog that can be programmed to tumble, roll and spin. The hedgehog takes one to two hours to construct, so it’s recommended for children over the age of 7, if they have an adult to help with the building portion, or 10 and older for solo play.

Marvel’s ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Power Gauntlet

Price: $69.99

The intricately detailed design of this electronically articulated Power Gauntlet is inspired by the “Avengers: Endgame” movie, part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Hasbro

Fans of Marvel’s “Avengers: Endgame” young and old can enjoy Hasbro’s Iron Man Power Gauntlet. The piece is a premium role-play item and features working lights and sounds. The articulated fingers can be controlled from inside the gauntlet and used for play or can be manipulated and locked for display.

Star Wars Scream Saber Lightsaber

Price: $29.99

The Star Wars Scream Saber allows boys and girls to record their own lightsaber sounds like wacky screams, funny animal noises, and other irreverent sounds. Hasbro

Want to be a Jedi — or a Sith — but don’t like the traditional buzzing sound of a lightsaber? The Star Wars Scream Saber is the perfect alternative. The roleplay item allows you to record a short sound bite or choose from a selection of pre-recorded sounds. Once you’ve input your sound, a “meow,” a scream or some other wacky noise or word, the saber will repeat it every time you swing the toy.

Paw Patrol Super Mighty Pups Lookout Tower

Price: $99.99

Standing 2 and 3/4-feet tall, kids have the perfect vantage point of Adventure Bay from the Mighty Lookout Tower’s real working telescope. When trouble is spotted, push the buttons to activate real lights and sounds and help the PAW Patrol save the day. Spin Master

One of the hottest entertainment properties in the world is “Paw Patrol.” From figurines to plush, kids can’t get enough of Ryder, Marshall, Skye and the rest of the Paw Patrol gang. The Paw Patrol Super Mighty Pups Lookout Tower stands just under three feet tall and features a working telescope. Kids can push the button on the tower to receive missions from Ryder and make use of a plastic zip line to get the pups ready to save the day.

Pinkfong Baby Shark Official Song Doll

Price: $16.99

Soft plush Baby Shark dolls sing verses from the baby shark song. WowWee

The earworm that kids can’t stop singing has been transformed into dozens of toys for the holidays. WowWee has brought to market a plush version of the three baby sharks from Pinkfong’s global hit song. Soft on the outside, these baby sharks will play different verses from the Baby Shark song when their tummies are pressed.

Funko Pops!

Price: $10 and up

Collectible Funko Pops from Funko. Funko

Collectibles aren’t just for kids. Funko has become a cornerstone in the geek merchandise industry with its variety of pop culture figurines. At an affordable price, these Pops make great stocking stuffers. From “Game of Thrones” and “Harry Potter” to “Dragonball Z” and “Fallout,” the company has more than 1,000 different licensed vinyl figures. Expect to see figures from “Frozen II,” “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” and “The Mandalorian” flying off shelves this holiday season.

Lego Hidden Side Graveyard Mystery

Price: $29.99

A unique play experience that combines the open creative play of LEGO building toys for kids with an augmented reality app. LEGO

For those looking to mix traditional building play with new technologies, Lego’s Hidden Side Graveyard Mystery could be the perfect gift for the holidays. Once the set is built, kids can play with it normally or download an augmented reality app that brings the set to life. Using the app, they can find and capture ghosts, play mini-games and unlock new challenges.

Fortnite Jumbo Loot Llama Pinata

Price: $70.99

Unbox theJumbo Llama by tearing it open and digging through confetti to reveal your loot. JAZWARES

Fortnite has become one of the most popular video game franchises of recent years. Parents looking to peel their kids away from the digital world and into physical play should check out the Jumbo Loot Llama Pinata set. The 25-inch-tall llama pinata needs to be busted open for kids to find the 100 pieces of loot inside, but they’ll need to wade through quite a bit of confetti.

The Nugget

Price: $229

The infinitely configurable play couch made up of four foam pieces: base, cushion, and two triangle pillows. The Nugget

At first glance, it may not look like a toy. But kids will be able to let their imaginations run wild with The Nugget. Gone are the days of draping blankets over stools and chairs to make forts. The Nugget play couch can be configured into different shapes for relaxation and play. The Nugget comes with four foam pieces: a base, a cushion and two triangle pillows. The play couch is a hot commodity and sells out quickly after it is restocked.

L.O.L. Surprise Winter Disco Chalet

Price: $239

L.O.L Surprise! Winter Disco Chalet is a wooden, multi-story, chalet-style house with 6 rooms and 3 stories. It includes more than 95 surprises inside. MGA Entertainment

Blind packs and collectibles have always been popular with kids, but L.O.L. Surprise seems to have changed the game. MGA Entertainment won a Toy of the Year Award for L.O.L. Surprise in 2017 and is not slowing down. Half the fun of buying an L.O.L Surprise is opening it. The dome-shaped case is filled with a doll and several accessories that are each hidden under a layer of plastic. Each time you peel back a layer, you get another surprise. There are thousands of YouTube videos dedicated to these “unboxings” with millions of views. While the smaller domes can be great stocking stuffers, MGA is offering up a massive doll house, the Winter Disco Chalet, this holiday season that contains more than 95 “surprises.”

Nerf Ultra One Blaster

Price: $49.99

Nerf Ultra darts are the farthest flying Nerf darts ever: blast into the game-changing superiority with Nerf Ultra darts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whats, toys, christmas, toy, surprise, baby, holiday, sounds, kids, holidays, play, hottest, wars, lists, wish


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Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it’s been crucial to her success

Stacey Abrams is a Yale-trained lawyer, an author and a politician who gained national attention in 2018 when she ran as Georgia’s democratic candidate for governor. “The spreadsheet is how I concretize how I intend to get there,” she told CNBC Make It at The Riveter Summit. “I like to say that until you write down how you plan to get there, it’s just a wish. Abrams said her spreadsheet, which she started as a teen, forces her to think about the direction she needs to take in order to reach a sp


Stacey Abrams is a Yale-trained lawyer, an author and a politician who gained national attention in 2018 when she ran as Georgia’s democratic candidate for governor.
“The spreadsheet is how I concretize how I intend to get there,” she told CNBC Make It at The Riveter Summit.
“I like to say that until you write down how you plan to get there, it’s just a wish.
Abrams said her spreadsheet, which she started as a teen, forces her to think about the direction she needs to take in order to reach a sp
Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it’s been crucial to her success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stacey, abrams, politician, need, yaletrained, write, wish, track, excel, life, crucial, work, map, spreadsheet, used, success, goals, think


Stacey Abrams has used an Excel spreadsheet to track life her goals since she was 18—why it's been crucial to her success

Stacey Abrams is a Yale-trained lawyer, an author and a politician who gained national attention in 2018 when she ran as Georgia’s democratic candidate for governor.

Though she lost the race to Republican Brian Kemp, Abrams remains a relentless political leader, now using her platform to combat voter suppression through her voting rights group, Fair Fight.

As a politician who has accomplished a lot in her career, Abrams says that one of the keys to her success has been to map out her life goals in an Excel spreadsheet so she can measure how well she’s tracking toward them.

“The spreadsheet is how I concretize how I intend to get there,” she told CNBC Make It at The Riveter Summit. “I like to say that until you write down how you plan to get there, it’s just a wish. It’s a dream. But when you actually lay out the steps and you think about what it takes to make something real, that makes it possible.”

Abrams said her spreadsheet, which she started as a teen, forces her to think about the direction she needs to take in order to reach a specific goal.

“If I want to be the No. 1 athlete,” says Abrams, “I can’t do it simply by watching other people play. I’ve got to do the work to get myself there. And so my spreadsheet has been, since I was 18, my road map for the things I need to learn and the work I need to do.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-14  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stacey, abrams, politician, need, yaletrained, write, wish, track, excel, life, crucial, work, map, spreadsheet, used, success, goals, think


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Facebook advertising VP Rob Goldman announces his departure

Facebook’s vice president of advertising, Rob Goldman, announced on Tuesday that he’s leaving the social media company. “After more than 7 years, today is my last day at Facebook,” Goldman wrote in a tweet. Goldman joined Facebook in 2012 as part of the company’s growth team, according to his LinkedIn profile. He was later director of product, ads and pages, and he was promoted to vice president in 2014. His comments were retweeted by President Donald Trump, and later, Goldman apologized to his


Facebook’s vice president of advertising, Rob Goldman, announced on Tuesday that he’s leaving the social media company.
“After more than 7 years, today is my last day at Facebook,” Goldman wrote in a tweet.
Goldman joined Facebook in 2012 as part of the company’s growth team, according to his LinkedIn profile.
He was later director of product, ads and pages, and he was promoted to vice president in 2014.
His comments were retweeted by President Donald Trump, and later, Goldman apologized to his
Facebook advertising VP Rob Goldman announces his departure Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vice, wish, later, facebook, wrote, workgoldman, social, advertising, announces, ads, departure, goldman, president, rob


Facebook advertising VP Rob Goldman announces his departure

Facebook’s vice president of advertising, Rob Goldman, announced on Tuesday that he’s leaving the social media company.

“After more than 7 years, today is my last day at Facebook,” Goldman wrote in a tweet. “What I will miss most are the people, who are among the smartest and most talented I’ve ever met. I wish them all the very best in their important work.”

Goldman joined Facebook in 2012 as part of the company’s growth team, according to his LinkedIn profile. He was later director of product, ads and pages, and he was promoted to vice president in 2014.

Goldman gained public attention in 2017, when he began tweeting about a variety of controversial topics, including whether Facebook uses the microphones on consumers’ smartphones to target ads. It’s “just not true,” Goldman said, about the matter.

In early 2018, he embroiled himself in a political dispute after sending several tweets that appeared to refute the findings of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. His comments were retweeted by President Donald Trump, and later, Goldman apologized to his colleagues on the internal Facebook social network.

A Facebook spokeswoman said in an email, “We wish him all the best.”

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-22  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vice, wish, later, facebook, wrote, workgoldman, social, advertising, announces, ads, departure, goldman, president, rob


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More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it

In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake. Whe


In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake. Whe
More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, say, responses, spent, wedding, cake, wish, worth, wisely, costs, married, actually


More than 50% of married people say these 3 wedding costs are actually worth it

Leading up to your wedding, you can expect to be in full-on decision making mode. Will you have a live band or a DJ at the reception? Chocolate cake or vanilla? Small wedding or large? The list goes on. Since most significant wedding purchases aren’t cheap, it’s important to choose wisely. In hindsight, married people agree three costs were worth the money: The bride’s dress, the wedding cake and photography. That’s according to a recent survey from Novi Financial Inc., which collected 1,000 responses from people ages 18 to 54 who married in the past decade. Participants were asked to rate different costs and share whether they felt it was worth it to splurge on various wedding expenses, such as a professional photographer, videographer, flowers, wedding cake and more. Of those polled, 56.6% said buying the bride’s dress was a good use of their money, followed by 53.1% who said photography and 52.4% who said the wedding cake.

When it comes to wedding purchases married people regret, 48.5% of those polled said wedding planners weren’t worth the cost, followed by 36.7% who said videography and 36.1% who said wedding favors. Other popular responses include the champagne toast (35.2%) and flowers (29.2%).

While wedding decisions are personal, it can be beneficial to have an idea of which purchases married people regret to see where it might be possible to cut costs. Over 40% of those who spent more than $30,000 on their big day wish they hadn’t spent so much and over two-thirds wish they had done “at least one thing” to reduce the cost of the wedding, the study found.

How to spend wisely on the wedding costs that count


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, purchases, say, responses, spent, wedding, cake, wish, worth, wisely, costs, married, actually


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After 38 years of marriage Jay Leno says this is the key to success

Jay Leno may be known for his affinity for cars — his auto collection includes over 100 vehicles — but his biggest commitment is to his wife of 38 years, Mavis. In a recent Q&A interview with The Wall Street Journal, Leno said, “I always tell people that you should marry the person you wish you could have been. He says he’s learned a key lesson: “The secret to a long marriage is realizing there’s nothing really worth fighting about.” The two met in 1976 The Comedy Store in Los Angeles, where Len


Jay Leno may be known for his affinity for cars — his auto collection includes over 100 vehicles — but his biggest commitment is to his wife of 38 years, Mavis. In a recent Q&A interview with The Wall Street Journal, Leno said, “I always tell people that you should marry the person you wish you could have been. He says he’s learned a key lesson: “The secret to a long marriage is realizing there’s nothing really worth fighting about.” The two met in 1976 The Comedy Store in Los Angeles, where Len
After 38 years of marriage Jay Leno says this is the key to success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marriage, los, married, leno, wife, worth, jay, interview, mavis, wish, success, angeles, key


After 38 years of marriage Jay Leno says this is the key to success

Jay Leno may be known for his affinity for cars — his auto collection includes over 100 vehicles — but his biggest commitment is to his wife of 38 years, Mavis.

In a recent Q&A interview with The Wall Street Journal, Leno said, “I always tell people that you should marry the person you wish you could have been. That’s a pretty good goal.”

He says he’s learned a key lesson: “The secret to a long marriage is realizing there’s nothing really worth fighting about.”

The two met in 1976 The Comedy Store in Los Angeles, where Leno was performing. Despite the length of their union, Leno revealed in a 2014 interview with the Los Angeles Times that their decision to get married wasn’t a romantic one – he didn’t even get Mavis an engagement ring until years later, because they had just bought a house at the time. Instead, they married because Jay had his own insurance policy and wanted it to include Mavis in case something happened to him.

“Might as well get married,” he says he thought. They had a small wedding with just a few friends in attendance.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marriage, los, married, leno, wife, worth, jay, interview, mavis, wish, success, angeles, key


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Here are the top 5 things people wish they hadn’t spent their hard-earned money on

You may not look into whether a car has a record of extensive repairs or what its gas mileage is. Let go of how much you spent, says Webb-Trujillo, who works in sales in northern Las Vegas. But Furman, a health-care recruiter in Minneapolis who has a personal finance blog, recently calculated just how much they’d spent. “Given the choice of spending $30,000 on a wedding or for a down payment, brides routinely choose the wedding,” Edelman said. “Knowing everything I do know, I wish we’d taken the


You may not look into whether a car has a record of extensive repairs or what its gas mileage is. Let go of how much you spent, says Webb-Trujillo, who works in sales in northern Las Vegas. But Furman, a health-care recruiter in Minneapolis who has a personal finance blog, recently calculated just how much they’d spent. “Given the choice of spending $30,000 on a wedding or for a down payment, brides routinely choose the wedding,” Edelman said. “Knowing everything I do know, I wish we’d taken the
Here are the top 5 things people wish they hadn’t spent their hard-earned money on Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hardearned, look, way, things, hadnt, car, wedding, edelman, insurance, getty, dont, money, wish, spent, morales


Here are the top 5 things people wish they hadn't spent their hard-earned money on

Whether it’s weekly Thai takeout or an air purifier you never took out of the box, most people have buyer’s remorse about something. Regret purchases tend to come in three types: things you never used; habitual things, like restaurant meals or drinks you no longer get any value from; or expensive things that kept you paying for a long time. In the Invest in You Spending Survey from CNBC + Acorns in partnership with SurveyMonkey, respondents pointed to clothes, alcohol and meals as purchases they came to regret. But it’s those expensive things — cars, timeshares, RVs — that are real pain points. Failing to realize the total costs of ownership is one of the biggest financial mistakes people make, says Ric Edelman, founder of Edelman Financial Engine. In other words, you look at the monthly payment on a new car without factoring in the costs of insurance and maintenance. You may not look into whether a car has a record of extensive repairs or what its gas mileage is. “Most SUVs and trucks get very poor mileage, and when people buy when gas prices are low, they don’t give it much thought,” Edelman said. “But the difference between 15 and 30 miles per gallon literally doubles your expense for transportation for fuel.” Life is too short to spend time beating yourself up over past mistakes. “Always look for the lesson,” said Susan Webb-Trujillo, 58, who says she has no regrets over past financial missteps. “I’ve also learned it is pointless to try to recoup any monetary loss if an object no longer fits a need.” Let go of how much you spent, says Webb-Trujillo, who works in sales in northern Las Vegas. “It is easier to remind yourself to not do the same thing again.” Here are five purchases that consumers regret the most.

1. Timeshares

Sportstock | E+ | Getty Images

Vicky Morales, 39, says she would never, ever again buy a timeshare. Vacation purchases can bring a lot of bitterness. Add confusing terms and the high-pressure sales tactics from companies that sell timeshares and you’ve got yourself a perfect storm of buyer’s remorse. Morales, who works with mortgages in southern California, bought into a large chain’s points system while on vacation in Hawaii in 2006. The presentation was tantalizing but confusing. “I was so misinformed by the way they sold it,” she said. “They offered us dinner and a lot of perks, and at the end I got $500 cash.” The points system Morales bought was $10,000 — closer to $13,000 with interest charges. The salesman didn’t go over the contract, and she wasn’t aware of the annual $600 fees. Morales had second thoughts when she returned home, so she called the salesman to cancel. But he persuaded her not to because it would reflect poorly on his performance. “I was young, and didn’t want him to look bad,” she said. As soon as Morales was finished paying for her timeshare, she put it up for sale after using it only a handful of times. “Definitely don’t do it without doing the proper research,” Morales said. She hopes to help prevent someone else from buying into one.

2. Expensive rides

Rick Gomez | Corbis | Getty Images

Over decades, monthly car payments can add up to a shocking amount. Jodi Furman, 45, thought she was doing everything right. She and her husband always had fairly nice cars — certified pre-owned ones — starting in their 20s. They shopped around. They made sure to get the best financing rates. But Furman, a health-care recruiter in Minneapolis who has a personal finance blog, recently calculated just how much they’d spent. “It’s a little stunning to think it’s in the nature of $200,000,” Furman said. “I’m a little sick to my stomach, honestly.” More from Invest in You:

Rent or buy refurbished so you can put money into a true investment

Make these 5 tweaks to your summer spending so you’re richer this fall

These people in their 30s are doing a simple thing to get rich Furman always had thought of car payments as a fixed cost. Her lightbulb moment came when she paid cash for a 10-year-old car because she wanted to lighten their credit load to qualify for a mortgage. “I figured I’d use it for five months and then trade it in,” she said. Within a few months she had saved about $4,000 on car payments and lower insurance — without lowering their coverage — and, she says, the car was still worth about what she’d paid for it.

3. Ultra-fancy weddings

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Wedding expenses can look very different years later. “Given the choice of spending $30,000 on a wedding or for a down payment, brides routinely choose the wedding,” Edelman said. They routinely express regret over that nuptials tab later, he added. At the time she got married, Ashlea Beers, 35, says she was very proud of how she and her fiance managed to rein in costs and spend just $5,000 for their wedding. But more than 10 years later the Denver stay-at-home mom says a great honeymoon would have been a much better way to spend the money. “You need to focus on each other,” said Beers. If you need to choose, a honeymoon is the better way to celebrate a relationship. As a former wedding coordinator and etiquette expert, Elaine Swann, founder of the Swann School of Protocol in Carlsbad, California, knows a thing or two about wedding costs. Among the first things she’d have a bride do is put together a realistic budget. Otherwise, you’ve got a train that’s left the station and is roaring along. Instead of starting with the number of guests, work backward from the amount of money you’ll be able to set aside by the date of the wedding. “That will give you a good idea of the type of wedding you can have,” Swann said. “Don’t borrow, and don’t go into debt.” “Knowing everything I do know, I wish we’d taken the money and eloped,” Beers said.

4. RVs

Maskot | Maskot | Getty Images

Allison Hale, 33, was moving across Texas to Austin. Inspired by the tiny house movement, she and her husband thought it would be fun to do something different when they sold their house, so they gave away most of their belongings and bought a huge RV for about $35,000. “We loved living in an RV,” she said. What they didn’t love: how expensive and difficult it was to find parking. The family stayed at lake resorts in the Austin area and, on top of the monthly payments and insurance, paid around $1,000 a month in resort fees. It was a good experience, and Hale says their young sons loved it. Then they left the RV for a few days, accidentally leaving the water on, causing a huge amount of damage. Many regard RVs as second homes, and the tax code treats them that way, too, says Edelman. “The problem is that homes tend to rise in value and RVs tend to fall in value,” Edelman said. “They’re not built to last 50 to 100 years the way houses are.” Hale’s vehicle is now worthless, but they are still on the hook each month for close to $1,500 for financing, storage and insurance. “Even finding someone to fix it has been a challenge,” Hale said. If you still think an RV is for you, Hale has this advice: Buy something you can afford, and pay cash. Be very realistic about where you’re going to put it and where you can afford to put it. Have an exit plan — don’t simply think you’ll put it in storage. Know that even with good insurance, you can still be liable for various expenses.

5. Fixer-uppers

ajcasanova | E+ | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hardearned, look, way, things, hadnt, car, wedding, edelman, insurance, getty, dont, money, wish, spent, morales


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