YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater
YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


YouTube CEO says 'sorry,' but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — YouTube’s chief executive apologized on Monday for the hurt she said is caused by videos with anti-gay slurs, but said the company was right to let the videos remain on its service.

CEO Susan Wojcicki, in an on-stage interview at the tech-focused Code Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, spoke publicly for the first time since YouTube last week imposed a stricter ban on hate speech, including videos that promote ideas of racial superiority.

But rather than being lauded for tackling Nazism, Wojcicki was met with a barrage of questions about videos she has decided to leave up. The questions were prompted by journalist Carlos Maza launching a campaign last month to bring attention to homophobic abuse and harassment he says he received from a conservative YouTube personality.

Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. Several activists are lobbying to ban YouTube’s parent company, Google, from the San Francisco Pride march this month over what they see as the service’s inaction.

“I know the decision we made was very hurtful to the LGBTQ community,” Wojcicki said. “That was not our intention at all. We’re really sorry about that.”

But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.”

“I do agree this was the right decision,” she said.

More from NBC News:

‘Our bodies, our choice’: N.Y. bill would decriminalize sex work

U.S. Customs says traveler images exposed in cyberattack

Deadly New York helicopter crash brings ‘a level of PTSD from 9/11’

Wojcicki, a high-profile Silicon Valley executive, faced a skeptical crowd at the annual conference for tech and media professionals. When Ina Fried, a journalist from Axios, suggested during a question-and-answer period that Wojcicki wasn’t actually sorry, the audience greeted the question with applause.

YouTube, like Facebook and other online services that rely on users for content, is facing growing scrutiny over material that shows violence, promotes hatred or is objectionable in other ways. The service’s rulebook bans harassment, for example, but only when it is “malicious.”

Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious material, and that the service faced a challenge in being consistent. She said the same rules needed to apply across the board, including to late-night comedy shows or rap music videos.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book


Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children. Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco. For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book
Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


Esther Wojcicki, the mom of 2 Silicon Valley CEOs and a doctor, shares key advice for raising successful kids

Esther Wojcicki knows what it takes to raise successful children.

Two of her daughters are powerful players in Silicon Valley: Susan Wojcicki is CEO of Google’s YouTube and Anne Wojcicki is co-founder and CEO of DNA testing company 23andMe. Her daughter, Janet Wojcicki, is a professor of pediatrics at the University of California at San Francisco.

So what’s her secret?

For one, you need to let your kids fail, she told CNBC.

“When you’re playing a sport, of course, you fail sometimes. You aren’t as good as you wish you would be. If you take a course and you don’t do so well, it’s OK,” said Wojcicki, author of the new book, “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.”

“Maybe you want to do it again or take the exercise again, or do whatever it is, but it’s OK not to like everything,” she added.

However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you shouldn’t help your children if they are struggling. The trick is to do it wisely, Wojcicki said in a recent interview with “Power Lunch.” “They need to come to you and ask for help,” she explained, saying that it’s something she uses in her classroom at Palo Alto High School in California, where she she teaches journalism.

“My general response to all kids in class when they ask for help is like, ‘Well, did you try to do it yourself?”” she said, urging them to perhaps to seek help online or to talk to a friend. “‘Let’s see whether you can’t figure it out without my intervention.'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raise, kids, shares, course, successful, help, need, mom, ok, silicon, ceo, wojcicki, key, valley, esther, fail, raising


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here’s one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making

Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others. What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start? Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simp


Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others. What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start? Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simp
I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here’s one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: esther wojcicki, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, doctorheres, right, mistakes, wojcicki, simple, thing, theres, making, dont, world, raised, youre, know, biggest, successful, parents


I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here's one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making

Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others.

We’re chasing money and possessions. Not service, not purpose. If we have a purpose at all, it’s to make ourselves happy. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others.

Your family may have similar stories and a natural impulse to serve. You might know exactly how I felt as a college student convinced I could change the world. But what if you don’t? What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start?

Well, I have good news: It’s not that hard. The main thing you need is the right attitude — toward yourself and your children. You can start small. Volunteer for one hour in your community. Go to a city council meeting. Research an issue that affects your neighborhood. At the very least, you can vote.

Everywhere there’s a problem to be solved, someone or some group to support and champion. It really is a way of being in the world, and when it comes to our kids, it pays to shape this perspective as early as possible.

This is an adapted excerpt from “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results,” by Esther Wojcicki to be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on May 6, 2019. Copyright © 2019. Used by permission.

Esther Wojcicki is the founder of the Media Arts programs at Palo Alto High School and serves as vice chair of Creative Commons and was instrumental in the launch of the Google Teacher Academy. Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: esther wojcicki, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, doctorheres, right, mistakes, wojcicki, simple, thing, theres, making, dont, world, raised, youre, know, biggest, successful, parents


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in
YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior.

The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in seemingly innocent videos. AT&T, Hasbro, Disney, Mattel and Nestle were among the companies that pulled their ads from the platform.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

7 books that everyone should read in 2019, recommended by execs from Twitter, Square and more

Author: John DoerrWhat it’s about: This book, written by engineer and acclaimed venture capitalist Doerr, explores how companies can set better goals and move from ideas to execution with a system that focuses on objective key results (OKRs), or the key things that need to be accomplished. Why you should read it: Top CEOs from Larry Page to Susan Wojcicki swear by this book for managers looking to engage their teams. “Not only will it teach you how to employ a super useful framework that will dr


Author: John DoerrWhat it’s about: This book, written by engineer and acclaimed venture capitalist Doerr, explores how companies can set better goals and move from ideas to execution with a system that focuses on objective key results (OKRs), or the key things that need to be accomplished. Why you should read it: Top CEOs from Larry Page to Susan Wojcicki swear by this book for managers looking to engage their teams. “Not only will it teach you how to employ a super useful framework that will dr
7 books that everyone should read in 2019, recommended by execs from Twitter, Square and more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: emma newburger, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, square, written, venture, read, recommended, execs, teach, book, teams, wojcicki, books, useful, key, tradesy, twitter, 2019, things


7 books that everyone should read in 2019, recommended by execs from Twitter, Square and more

Author: John Doerr

What it’s about: This book, written by engineer and acclaimed venture capitalist Doerr, explores how companies can set better goals and move from ideas to execution with a system that focuses on objective key results (OKRs), or the key things that need to be accomplished.

Why you should read it: Top CEOs from Larry Page to Susan Wojcicki swear by this book for managers looking to engage their teams. “Not only will it teach you how to employ a super useful framework that will drive focus and growth,” says Kamini Rangappan Lane, the CMO of peer-to-peer marketplace Tradesy, “but the book has really interesting, real life anecdotes from everyone from Bono to Bill Gates.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-21  Authors: emma newburger, scott mlyn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, square, written, venture, read, recommended, execs, teach, book, teams, wojcicki, books, useful, key, tradesy, twitter, 2019, things


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon-led health venture should focus on life expectancy and disease prevention, experts say

The health-care partnership between Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan, announced early this year, is one of the biggest stories in the industry. Both of them had some advice to offer Atul Gawande, the newly-appointed CEO of the initiative, on where to spend his time and resources. Quake, who co-leads the Mark Zuckerberg-backed Biohub, a scientific research initiative based in San Francisco, said that Gawande should focus on improving life expectancy. Studies are finding that mortality r


The health-care partnership between Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan, announced early this year, is one of the biggest stories in the industry. Both of them had some advice to offer Atul Gawande, the newly-appointed CEO of the initiative, on where to spend his time and resources. Quake, who co-leads the Mark Zuckerberg-backed Biohub, a scientific research initiative based in San Francisco, said that Gawande should focus on improving life expectancy. Studies are finding that mortality r
Amazon-led health venture should focus on life expectancy and disease prevention, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: christina farr, matt winkelmeyer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partnership, initiative, venture, research, life, amazonled, say, prevention, health, experts, change, wojcicki, san, disease, expectancy, quake, focus, francisco, opportunity, gawande


Amazon-led health venture should focus on life expectancy and disease prevention, experts say

The health-care partnership between Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan, announced early this year, is one of the biggest stories in the industry.

So it’s only natural that 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki and Stanford University’s Steven Quake, who have spent decades working in and around health care, were asked about it on stage at the Wired 25th anniversary summit on Monday. Both of them had some advice to offer Atul Gawande, the newly-appointed CEO of the initiative, on where to spend his time and resources.

Quake, who co-leads the Mark Zuckerberg-backed Biohub, a scientific research initiative based in San Francisco, said that Gawande should focus on improving life expectancy. Studies are finding that mortality rates have declined each decade in developed nations like the U.S., but that’s now starting to change. There’s been a plateau, which can be chalked up to a variety of factors, including the increasing prevalence of heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

Recent research also points to a marked decline in the heath of lower-income Caucasians, which is fueled in part by vulnerability to drug and alcohol abuse and suicide.

“Most of the developed world is on one curve,” Quake said, at the conference in San Francisco. “The U.S. is an outlier.”

For Quake and Wojcicki, the partnership Gawande is leading provides a unique opportunity to drive results because of the size and influence the three companies possess and the amount of technology and talent at their fingertips.

Amazon, which employs hundreds of thousands of people in its warehouses, recently took the important step of hiking its hourly minimum wage to $15. Quake said the companies have to think big to change the status quo.

“I don’t know how you change the system incrementally,” he said. “Big experiments like that are an opportunity to get us on the curve.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: christina farr, matt winkelmeyer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partnership, initiative, venture, research, life, amazonled, say, prevention, health, experts, change, wojcicki, san, disease, expectancy, quake, focus, francisco, opportunity, gawande


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

23andMe took years building a direct-to-consumer health business

For more than a decade, Anne Wojcicki had a simple goal: Give people direct access to their medical data. Consumers have been able to digitally track and control their finances, travel and shopping since the early days of the internet. But retrieving their most sensitive health information, like whether they’re at risk of cancer or could be a carrier for sickle cell anemia, requires a prescription from a doctor. So in 2006, Wojcicki left a career in biotech investing to start 23andMe, with the g


For more than a decade, Anne Wojcicki had a simple goal: Give people direct access to their medical data. Consumers have been able to digitally track and control their finances, travel and shopping since the early days of the internet. But retrieving their most sensitive health information, like whether they’re at risk of cancer or could be a carrier for sickle cell anemia, requires a prescription from a doctor. So in 2006, Wojcicki left a career in biotech investing to start 23andMe, with the g
23andMe took years building a direct-to-consumer health business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: christina farr, michael kovac, getty images, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, richard drew, susana gonzalez, abigail stevenson, ponywang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, theyre, wojcicki, travel, directtoconsumer, goal, told, track, simple, business, start, 23andme, took, building, learn


23andMe took years building a direct-to-consumer health business

For more than a decade, Anne Wojcicki had a simple goal: Give people direct access to their medical data.

Consumers have been able to digitally track and control their finances, travel and shopping since the early days of the internet. But retrieving their most sensitive health information, like whether they’re at risk of cancer or could be a carrier for sickle cell anemia, requires a prescription from a doctor.

So in 2006, Wojcicki left a career in biotech investing to start 23andMe, with the goal of helping people obtain personal health data by mailing in a saliva sample.

“I was always impressed by the eagerness of individuals to learn about their health and take action,” Wojcicki told CNBC. “They just needed the opportunity and time to learn and absorb.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22  Authors: christina farr, michael kovac, getty images, george kavallines, david paul morris, bloomberg, richard drew, susana gonzalez, abigail stevenson, ponywang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, theyre, wojcicki, travel, directtoconsumer, goal, told, track, simple, business, start, 23andme, took, building, learn


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

YouTube Brandcast presentation shows Alphabet wealth

YouTube wants to assure companies it can provide brand-safe environments for their ads — and it’s willing to spend to prove it. The company spared no expense at Brandcast, its annual event for advertisers. Around 4,200 people attended the event, which not only showed off YouTube’s widespread content but its parent company’s wealth. Alphabet, which includes YouTube as part of its Google business unit, had a free cash flow of $4.34 billion last quarter, according to its latest quarterly report. Th


YouTube wants to assure companies it can provide brand-safe environments for their ads — and it’s willing to spend to prove it. The company spared no expense at Brandcast, its annual event for advertisers. Around 4,200 people attended the event, which not only showed off YouTube’s widespread content but its parent company’s wealth. Alphabet, which includes YouTube as part of its Google business unit, had a free cash flow of $4.34 billion last quarter, according to its latest quarterly report. Th
YouTube Brandcast presentation shows Alphabet wealth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-04  Authors: michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, alphabet, event, companies, according, brandcast, wealth, ads, youtubes, youtube, wojcicki, shows, billion, company, presentation


YouTube Brandcast presentation shows Alphabet wealth

YouTube wants to assure companies it can provide brand-safe environments for their ads — and it’s willing to spend to prove it.

The company spared no expense at Brandcast, its annual event for advertisers. This year, the spectacle was held at Radio City Music Hall in New York on Thursday. Around 4,200 people attended the event, which not only showed off YouTube’s widespread content but its parent company’s wealth. Alphabet, which includes YouTube as part of its Google business unit, had a free cash flow of $4.34 billion last quarter, according to its latest quarterly report.

The video service now has 1.8 billion logged in monthly users according YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, showing off the scale and amount of data it can obtain. The company is hoping it can convince brands to part with more of their advertising budgets earmarked for television, especially with new ad products that let companies buy ads for audiences that watch YouTube on TVs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-04  Authors: michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, alphabet, event, companies, according, brandcast, wealth, ads, youtubes, youtube, wojcicki, shows, billion, company, presentation


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

YouTube will add Wikipedia links debunking conspiracy theory videos

Wojcicki said that the new feature will only be used on conspiracies causing “significant debate” on YouTube, like those about chemtrails or the moon landing. Because that conspiracy took off in a matter of days, it isn’t clear whether a Wikipedia page disputing that theory would even be available yet. Also, because Wikipedia pages are crowd-sourced, a page for a given event may not necessarily be accurate. Wojcicki was also asked about why it can place an outright ban on hateful content — like


Wojcicki said that the new feature will only be used on conspiracies causing “significant debate” on YouTube, like those about chemtrails or the moon landing. Because that conspiracy took off in a matter of days, it isn’t clear whether a Wikipedia page disputing that theory would even be available yet. Also, because Wikipedia pages are crowd-sourced, a page for a given event may not necessarily be accurate. Wojcicki was also asked about why it can place an outright ban on hateful content — like
YouTube will add Wikipedia links debunking conspiracy theory videos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-13  Authors: jillian donfro, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wojcicki, debunking, add, clear, video, yetalso, youtube, conspiracy, videos, links, page, content, wikipedia, theory, youtubes


YouTube will add Wikipedia links debunking conspiracy theory videos

Wojcicki said that the new feature will only be used on conspiracies causing “significant debate” on YouTube, like those about chemtrails or the moon landing. After the school shooting in Parkland, Florida earlier this year, a video that theorized that one of the survivors was a crisis actor made it into YouTube’s Trending section. Because that conspiracy took off in a matter of days, it isn’t clear whether a Wikipedia page disputing that theory would even be available yet.

Also, because Wikipedia pages are crowd-sourced, a page for a given event may not necessarily be accurate.

Wojcicki was also asked about why it can place an outright ban on hateful content — like videos published by neo-Nazi groups — but not on videos that are untrue.

Wojcicki said that hatefulness is “more clear” than if something is true or false, and that YouTube doesn’t want to be an arbiter of truth.

YouTube, like other tech giants Facebook and Twitter, has long made the distinction that it is not a media organization, and thus bears less responsibility for the content on its platform.

A YouTube spokesperson told CNBC that the information cues initiative is part of broader efforts to tackle the proliferation of misinformation on the site.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-13  Authors: jillian donfro, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wojcicki, debunking, add, clear, video, yetalso, youtube, conspiracy, videos, links, page, content, wikipedia, theory, youtubes


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

YouTube CEO on Facebook’s video ambitions: ‘They should get back to baby pictures’

Facebook should ditch its video ambitions and “get back to baby pictures and sharing,” YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki quipped on stage Tuesday night. Wojcicki fielded a question on increasing competition from Facebook during Recode’s Code Media conference outside Los Angeles. The social network has been beefing up its video offering in what sources have described to CNBC as a more direct assault on YouTube. Although Wojcicki spoke partially in jest, she likely would sleep easier if Facebook’s loomin


Facebook should ditch its video ambitions and “get back to baby pictures and sharing,” YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki quipped on stage Tuesday night. Wojcicki fielded a question on increasing competition from Facebook during Recode’s Code Media conference outside Los Angeles. The social network has been beefing up its video offering in what sources have described to CNBC as a more direct assault on YouTube. Although Wojcicki spoke partially in jest, she likely would sleep easier if Facebook’s loomin
YouTube CEO on Facebook’s video ambitions: ‘They should get back to baby pictures’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-02-13  Authors: jillian donfro, harriet taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, ambitions, video, baby, think, question, content, youtube, stage, facebooks, pictures, wojcicki, watch, facebook


YouTube CEO on Facebook's video ambitions: 'They should get back to baby pictures'

Facebook should ditch its video ambitions and “get back to baby pictures and sharing,” YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki quipped on stage Tuesday night.

Wojcicki fielded a question on increasing competition from Facebook during Recode’s Code Media conference outside Los Angeles.

The social network has been beefing up its video offering in what sources have described to CNBC as a more direct assault on YouTube. Facebook has talked to advertisers about expanding its “Watch” video product to more individual creators and rolling out an advertising system similar to YouTube’s where all parties get a split of the revenue.

When Recode co-founder Kara Swisher asked Wojcicki on stage about whether she worries about increased competition from Facebook, the YouTube CEO returned a very diplomatic answer:

“I mean you always have to take your competitors seriously, but you don’t win by looking backwards and looking around,” she said, adding that she didn’t know anything about Facebook’s plans beyond what was reported in the media.

But, when pressed, she conceded:

“I mean, I think they should focus on what they’re focused on,” she said. “I think they should get back to baby pictures and sharing.”

Although Wojcicki spoke partially in jest, she likely would sleep easier if Facebook’s looming video threat faded out. In the wake of controversy about inappropriate content on the service, YouTube recently announced changes to its advertising program that make it harder for small creators to make money from the platform, which gives Facebook an avenue for appealing to them. Meanwhile, both platforms have been vying for major content wins, like National Football League streaming.

“We should all compete for content,” Wojcicki said. “I build our business and I focus on what we need to do, and I know that we have a lot of things to do … And we’re going to keep doing them because that’s the way that we’re going to get strong.”

You can watch Wojcicki’s interview in its entirety here (start at ~30:30 for the question on Facebook) and read the relevant excerpt below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-02-13  Authors: jillian donfro, harriet taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, ambitions, video, baby, think, question, content, youtube, stage, facebooks, pictures, wojcicki, watch, facebook


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post