WeWork doesn’t have a single woman director, according to IPO filing

It’s 2019, and a $47 billion company is going public with an all-male board of directors. WeWork’s parent known formally as the We Company disclosed who comprises its board in an initial public offering prospectus early on Wednesday. As of last month, every S&P 500 company had at least one female director on its board. Its underwriters, including J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, have also contributed $6 billion toward a credit facility, contingent upon the IPO. In the first half of the year, 13 wo


It’s 2019, and a $47 billion company is going public with an all-male board of directors. WeWork’s parent known formally as the We Company disclosed who comprises its board in an initial public offering prospectus early on Wednesday. As of last month, every S&P 500 company had at least one female director on its board. Its underwriters, including J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, have also contributed $6 billion toward a credit facility, contingent upon the IPO. In the first half of the year, 13 wo
WeWork doesn’t have a single woman director, according to IPO filing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: leslie picker deirdre bosa, leslie picker, deirdre bosa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, woman, doesnt, wework, investors, public, company, companies, filing, director, allmale, women, billion, according, ipo, single, going, board


WeWork doesn't have a single woman director, according to IPO filing

Signage is seen at the entrance of the WeWork offices on Broad Street in New York.

It’s 2019, and a $47 billion company is going public with an all-male board of directors.

WeWork’s parent known formally as the We Company disclosed who comprises its board in an initial public offering prospectus early on Wednesday. Among the seven members, not a single one is female. The company was most-recently valued privately at $47 billion although it’s unclear if they’ll receive the same price tag from the public markets.

As of last month, every S&P 500 company had at least one female director on its board. It’s become a more-prominent issue in recent years as major investors, such as BlackRock and State Street, have pushed back against companies with all-male directors. Having a more-diverse board is seen as an avenue toward better shareholder returns.

In several weeks, WeWork is expected to launch a roadshow where it will meet with investors and seek to drum up support for what’s likely going to be a multi-billion-dollar stock sale. Its underwriters, including J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, have also contributed $6 billion toward a credit facility, contingent upon the IPO.

WeWork declined to comment on the makeup of its board of directors.

WeWork does have several women in management positions. Rebekah Neumann — the co-founder and wife of Adam Newmann, the CEO — serves as chief brand and impact officer. And Jennfer Berrent is the co-president and chief legal officer.

Adam Neumann serves as chairman of the board. WeWork’s board also includes Bruce Dunlevie, a founding partner of Benchmark Capital, as well as Ronald Fisher, vice chairman of SoftBank, two of the company’s largest investors. Other members include Lewis Frankfort, Steven Langman, Mark Schwartz and John Zhao.

WeWork has a triple-class share structure and will be a controlled company, making it difficult for an outside investor to wage a proxy contest that would alter the makeup of the board.

Amid a boom in initial public offerings in 2019, women have been gaining ground in the C-Suite. In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public, representing about 15 percent of the total IPOs over that period. That’s the highest proportion of any year going back to at least 2014, an analysis by CNBC found.

Historically, women were more absent from the boardrooms of companies making their debuts. A study released last month by 2020 Women on Boards found that 37 percent of the 75 largest IPOs from 2014 to 2016 debuted with all-male boards. But in the last few years, it’s become a much less common occurrence, especially among larger private companies that have waited far longer to go public.

WeWork disclosed its prospectus after being on file confidentially. The company is aiming for a debut in September, people with knowledge of the timeline said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: leslie picker deirdre bosa, leslie picker, deirdre bosa
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, woman, doesnt, wework, investors, public, company, companies, filing, director, allmale, women, billion, according, ipo, single, going, board


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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Meet the woman who’s working to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030

“Not nearly enough women see what’s possible for their leadership in elected office,” she tells CNBC Make It. The non-partisan organization recruits and trains women to run for office. Her goal, she says, is to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030. But after operating that program for a few years, Cutraro realized that convincing women to run was only half the battle. I’m never going to run for office myself, but I want to see the great women around me do it.'”


“Not nearly enough women see what’s possible for their leadership in elected office,” she tells CNBC Make It. The non-partisan organization recruits and trains women to run for office. Her goal, she says, is to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030. But after operating that program for a few years, Cutraro realized that convincing women to run was only half the battle. I’m never going to run for office myself, but I want to see the great women around me do it.'”
Meet the woman who’s working to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leadership, 250000, organization, program, elected, women, office, cutraro, meet, working, shes, run, woman, whos, work, 2030


Meet the woman who's working to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030

Today, 62% of elected offices at the federal, state and local level are occupied by white men. But according to data from the Reflective Democracy Campaign, a nonpartisan group that studies the demographics of those elected into office in the U.S., that doesn’t mean they have an advantage in political elections. In fact, a June study by the group found that when women and people of color run for office, they have the same chance at winning as their white male counterparts. Erin Loos Cutraro is the founder of She Should Run, and she wants to make sure women have what they need to enter and win those races. A former political director for the Women’s Campaign Fund, a nonpartisan organization committed to achieving 50/50 representation by men and women in elected office, Cutraro saw first-hand the pipeline problem that women face in politics. “Not nearly enough women see what’s possible for their leadership in elected office,” she tells CNBC Make It. “And too many women, when they do see what’s possible for themselves, disqualify themselves because they don’t feel they are qualified enough to do the job.” In an effort to address this challenge, Cutraro launched She Should Run in 2011. The non-partisan organization recruits and trains women to run for office. Her goal, she says, is to get 250,000 women to run for office by 2030. That’s half the number of elected positions nationwide, most of which are at the local level.

She Should Run cohort participants. Photo credit: She Should Run

Cutraro says she’s never thought about running for office herself, but says that her experiences as a mother, teacher and non-profit worker have motivated her to do the work that’s needed in order to achieve gender equity in leadership. “[I became] impatient with slow gains in the overall percentage of women serving office at all levels and with little-to-no evidence of strategic attention going into the long-term game play of building the future pipeline,” says the 42-year-old, who serves as a full-time CEO of the non-profit. In the beginning, she says, the purpose her D.C.-based organization was to focus on a program called “Ask a Woman to Run,” where people could use a simple online tool to nominate a woman who they thought should consider running for office. From there, She Should Run would reach out to the recommended woman to talk to her about the idea and address any concerns she had about political leadership. But after operating that program for a few years, Cutraro realized that convincing women to run was only half the battle. Once the seed was planted in a woman’s head, they needed to be connected to information about what to do once you decide you want to run. “There are a number of incredible organizations that work with women who have already made the decision to run, in terms of helping them get those one-on-one skills, helping them to run a campaign and beyond,” she says. “But what we’ve found is there is a big step that happens before that, where it is both convincing women of what’s possible in elected office and also helping them navigate what is the right next step.” In 2015 Cutraro and her team started to think about the resources women needed to help connect the dots. The following year they launched the She Should Run Incubator, a set of online courses to help women develop the leadership, networking and communication skills needed to run for office. “We were assuming we were about to elect the first female president,” says Cutraro. “We knew our work was going to get a lot harder because people would assume ‘Job done. Let’s move on to the next issue,’ when in reality, we still had a very long way to go.”

She Should Run cohort participants. Photo credit: She should Run

After officially launching the incubator, the organization set a goal to get 100 women into its program by the end of the year. But Cutraro says after an unexpected election outcome, they surpassed that goal and closed out the year with 5,500 participants. Today, she says, a little over 16,000 women have shown interest in the incubator program, and in 2018, more than 130 women who’d participated in the incubator were on ballots. She Should Run also launched “regional cohorts” throughout the country, bringing groups of women together for a six-month combined virtual and in-person program led by women leaders with political experience. More recently, the organization launched a professional development series, partnering with companies to educate women employees on the steps they can take to earn leadership roles at work and in their communities. Partners in the program include Birchbox and Girls Who Code. Cutraro says the idea for the program was prompted by research that found that for every eight women who think about running for office, an average of one puts their name on a ballot. “We started thinking through the key places where a conversation about women’s leadership is already happening.” For most women, she says, that’s at the office.

She Should Run Chicago cohort participant Mary Beth Canty. In April, she ran and won the position of Village Trustee for Arlington Heights, Illinois. Photo credit: She Should Run

Mary Beth Canty is a management consultant who’s seen first-hand the impact She Should Run is having on getting more women into office. After a friend encouraged her to look into the program, Canty participated in the organization’s Chicago cohort at the end of 2017 into early 2018. In April, she ran for the position of Village Trustee for Arlington Heights, Illinois — and she won. Through She Should Run, Canty says she learned how to effectively communicate her story so that people could understand why she’s running and what she wants to accomplish. She says she also learned how to ask for financial backing, which can be a huge hurdle for a lot of people. “I think, particularly for female candidates, making the ask is a challenge,” she says. “We don’t always feel comfortable or confident asking people for money or for help.” Cutraro says she’s grateful for the record number of women and people of color who ran for and were elected to Congressional offices this year because she’s hoping it will encourage more people from diverse backgrounds to do the same. “Research shows that role models are essential,” she says. “What we have seen is a continued growth in our community across the board and incredible diversity in our programs. “It’s not just the women themselves that I am encouraged by. It is a greater community of individuals that are like, ‘I want to be part of this moment in time of growth. I’m never going to run for office myself, but I want to see the great women around me do it.'” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leadership, 250000, organization, program, elected, women, office, cutraro, meet, working, shes, run, woman, whos, work, 2030


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Meet the woman whose name is on 2 million pints of ice cream

Jeni Britton Bauer, founder of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, absolutely loves ice cream. “We don’t even think of ice cream as dessert here,” she says, adding that it’s practically its own food group. Just like drinking coffee in the morning is a sacred ritual, so is enjoying ice cream in the evening. “Ice cream has always been a part of my life, and I think it was meant to be.” “I am a communicator, and I like making ice cream and being on the ground with our team,” she says.


Jeni Britton Bauer, founder of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, absolutely loves ice cream. “We don’t even think of ice cream as dessert here,” she says, adding that it’s practically its own food group. Just like drinking coffee in the morning is a sacred ritual, so is enjoying ice cream in the evening. “Ice cream has always been a part of my life, and I think it was meant to be.” “I am a communicator, and I like making ice cream and being on the ground with our team,” she says.
Meet the woman whose name is on 2 million pints of ice cream Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, britton, bauer, jenis, million, business, cream, ice, market, splendid, day, north, meet, woman, pints


Meet the woman whose name is on 2 million pints of ice cream

Jeni Britton Bauer, founder of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream, absolutely loves ice cream. As you’d expect. Who doesn’t? After nearly 25 years in the business, making and selling ice cream has been hardwired into her very essence. And that’s due, in part, to her upbringing. “I grew up loving ice cream because I’m from the Midwest,” Britton Bauer, tells CNBC Make It. “We don’t even think of ice cream as dessert here,” she says, adding that it’s practically its own food group. Certainly something that you eat every day. Just like drinking coffee in the morning is a sacred ritual, so is enjoying ice cream in the evening. And Britton Bauer’s journey toward building a thriving ice cream business started early in life. Britton Bauer vividly recalls the moment her grandmother put her on the path to becoming an ice cream entrepreneur at just 10 years old. “She was standing in the kitchen stirring a pot, and she stopped me in my tracks and said: ‘Jeni, you’re so lucky because you can be whatever you want to be. You can be a doctor, lawyer, an astronaut. It wasn’t like that for me.'” At the time, Britton Bauer simply responded with a “Thanks, Grandma,” and darted off. “But I remember, when I when I ran outside — in that moment — I thought, Well if that’s true then I’ll be an ice cream maker, ” she recalls. “Ice cream has always been a part of my life, and I think it was meant to be.” Even if Britton Bauer was destined to create ice cream — and selling a stunning 2 million pints last year alone suggests she was — that doesn’t mean building her business from the ground up was easy.

Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams has expanded to 36 scoop shops and counting. Souce: Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

A simple ice cream stall and lot of ambition

Seven years before Britton Bauer started her own business, she got her first taste of the industry when she took a job at a local ice cream parlor when she was just 15. “I loved it,” Britton Bauer says of that first job. Yes, her arms hurt and she got blisters from scooping. “I had to wear gloves the first few weeks,” she says. “To this day my right arm is bigger than my left arm, and it all started back then.” The part-time job did more than just introduce Britton Bauer to the ice cream business, it acquainted her with the concept of service. “I felt like I could put all of my nervous energy aside and put all of my focus on someone else,” she says. “I really believe that’s why I make ice cream now. The way that I approach everything in my life is from that point of view of service, because it’s where I feel absolutely comfortable.” It was while she was attending Ohio State University as an art major that she had an epiphany that would officially lead her down the path to starting her own business: Scent is a vital component of ice cream. “Scent and flavor sort of blooms in ice cream,” she says. Once she realized that, she became obsessed with making ice cream at home, blending together essential oils like rose and cayenne with a vanilla or chocolate base. She eventually quit art school — just walked out of art class one day — and started a small shop called Scream Ice Cream in Columbus’ North Market in 1996. Britton Bauer spent each day learning on the job, working out of a tiny freezer to create flavors that combined ingredients from other local vendors in the market. One of the first flavors Britton Bauer offered was a salty caramel. She had mastered the art of caramel making while working in a French bakery. And it proved to be a winning recipe for her. “People would drive in from the surrounding states to get it,” she says. But the popularity of one flavor did not turn Scream Ice Cream into an instant business success.

Jeni Britton Bauer at the original North Market location in Columbus, Ohio. Source: Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

“We were a little bit on hard times when I was starting my first company,” she recalls. In a typical month, she says she took home $600, charging just $5 for pints and roughly $2 for a scoop. “We were losing money,” she ruefully admits. “I barely made it. I only ate because merchants in the market would help me. I’d trade ice cream for food. I didn’t have a car, I took the bus every day or I rode my bike,” she says. “But nobody told me to go back to school. Nobody told me to go get a real job.” And so she pushed forward. Eventually, she closed Scream Ice Cream in 2000 and spent the next two years fine-tuning the business. Britton Bauer opened a revamped shop simply called Jeni’s at North Market in 2002.

Taking Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams national

Starting at a farmer’s market in Columbus, Ohio, turned out to be one of the best things for Jeni’s, Britton Bauer says. Not only was the rent cheap, but she had direct access farmers and a wider community of specialty chocolate and spice vendors who had all the ingredients she could ever need for her bespoke flavor combinations. Columbus is also conveniently located within a day’s drive of roughly 60% of the population in North America, she says. That allowed Jeni’s to grow a shipping business just two years after opening, which led to interest by the national press. “We were doing all the food magazines,” she recalls. “They were all very interested in what we were doing there in Columbus, Ohio.” Even as the company grew, Britton Bauer knew she wanted to stay involved with developing new flavors and serving customers. “I was behind the counter every single day for eight years straight. I made ice cream in the morning and then I helped customers all day,” she says.

I just think your life should be an adventure. I like being an explorer and I’m OK in uncharted territory. I’m OK being a little bit scared, I like it. Jeni Britton Bauer

In 2009, seven years after opening Jeni’s, Britton Bauer brought in former GE Aviation corporate counsel John Lowe as the CEO. “I am a communicator, and I like making ice cream and being on the ground with our team,” she says. “I’m not the HR, organizational, structural, legal, financial wizard, and I needed somebody who was awesome at that stuff so that we could become what we needed to become,” she says. Bringing in an expert proved critical because, as it turns out, ice cream is not an easy business. “It looks easy — we want it to look effortless,” Britton Bauer says. “But it is really a very complex business to be in.” It takes a lot of effort and a lot of people and a lot of work to do this — whether it’s opening up new shops or jumping into the grocery store market, she says. Or dealing with a listeria crisis, which the company had to navigate in 2015. Jeni’s overhauled its food safety program as a result and now checks every single batch of ice cream to avoid an outbreak happening again. Today, she and Lowe work together in a system Britton Bauer refers to as “the two-headed monster.” She’s not in every meeting, but she admits it takes an “enormous” amount of trust. “I understand it’s not right for everybody, but it was absolutely the best thing I could have done for the company.”

Jeni Britton Bauer at the original North Market location in Columbus, Ohio. Source: Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams

Tens of millions of scoops and counting…

Over the past 17 years, Jeni’s has expanded to 36 scoop shops across the country, from Los Angeles to Atlanta. And yes, there’s still a location at North Market. Last year, the stores sold 4 million scoops and 1 million waffle cones, helping Jeni’s surpass $42 million in overall sales, according to the company. Part of the draw of Jeni’s ice cream is that the company is committed to using high-quality, sustainable ingredients from local farmers and producers. This takes more work, and can be more costly (Jeni’s sells its pints for $12 through its website), but not taking shortcuts differentiates Jeni’s ice cream, a company spokeswoman says. Britton Bauer credits the success of the scoop shops, in particular, to the atmosphere Jeni’s fosters. “People identify with flavor. If you’re a cookies and cream person, it’s like you know you’re that. Or you’re a mint chocolate chip person or a chocolate person.” But then they stop in a Jeni’s scoop shop with friends or family, and people learn a little bit about each other, she says. “You come in and you taste something you’ve never had before. And even if you end up getting your old standby, you still have this adventure at the counter.”

People think that I’ve gotten good at ice cream. Well yeah, it wasn’t that hard [to learn]. But what I’ve really gotten good at is resilience. You get better at resilience the more you practice it. Jeni Britton Bauer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, britton, bauer, jenis, million, business, cream, ice, market, splendid, day, north, meet, woman, pints


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Airline sends $106,000 bill to woman who tried to open doors mid-flight

Trump was suspected of talking to Cohen, Hicks about plan to stop… The filing came a day after the judge in Michael Cohen’s criminal case ordered their release, saying that the end of a probe into those payments to alleged sexual partners of… Politicsread more


Trump was suspected of talking to Cohen, Hicks about plan to stop… The filing came a day after the judge in Michael Cohen’s criminal case ordered their release, saying that the end of a probe into those payments to alleged sexual partners of… Politicsread more
Airline sends $106,000 bill to woman who tried to open doors mid-flight Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, talking, probe, woman, 106000, stopthe, sexual, doors, trump, plan, sends, airline, suspected, release, saying, tried, bill, payments, midflight


Airline sends $106,000 bill to woman who tried to open doors mid-flight

Trump was suspected of talking to Cohen, Hicks about plan to stop…

The filing came a day after the judge in Michael Cohen’s criminal case ordered their release, saying that the end of a probe into those payments to alleged sexual partners of…

Politics

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, talking, probe, woman, 106000, stopthe, sexual, doors, trump, plan, sends, airline, suspected, release, saying, tried, bill, payments, midflight


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Watch: Donald Trump parties in 1992 with now-accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein, pats woman’s rear end

President Donald Trump sure looked like he was a fan of Jeffrey Epstein in 1992. A newly surfaced video reveals Trump happily partying in November of that year at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida with Epstein, a wealthy financier who since then has become both a registered sex offender and an accused child sex trafficker. The video, from NBC’s archives, also shows Trump matter-of-factly grabbing from behind the waist of a young woman, pulling her back into him — and then casually tapping her bot


President Donald Trump sure looked like he was a fan of Jeffrey Epstein in 1992. A newly surfaced video reveals Trump happily partying in November of that year at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida with Epstein, a wealthy financier who since then has become both a registered sex offender and an accused child sex trafficker. The video, from NBC’s archives, also shows Trump matter-of-factly grabbing from behind the waist of a young woman, pulling her back into him — and then casually tapping her bot
Watch: Donald Trump parties in 1992 with now-accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein, pats woman’s rear end Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, epstein, jeffrey, newly, parties, woman, nowaccused, wife, young, estate, womenand, sex, pats, trump, trafficker, rear, watch, womans


Watch: Donald Trump parties in 1992 with now-accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein, pats woman's rear end

President Donald Trump sure looked like he was a fan of Jeffrey Epstein in 1992.

A newly surfaced video reveals Trump happily partying in November of that year at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida with Epstein, a wealthy financier who since then has become both a registered sex offender and an accused child sex trafficker.

The video, from NBC’s archives, also shows Trump matter-of-factly grabbing from behind the waist of a young woman, pulling her back into him — and then casually tapping her bottom with his right hand.

Elsewhere on the same video, Trump beams as he is surrounded by and dances with other young women.

And when he stands with Epstein checking out the dance floor of the shindig at the Palm Beach estate, Trump is seen gesturing toward a woman and appears to say to Epstein: “Look at her, back there … she’s hot.”

Epstein smiles and nods in response, the tape shows.

At the time, the real estate developer and casino owner Trump was newly divorced from his first wife, Ivanka, and a year away from wedding his second wife, Marla Maples.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, epstein, jeffrey, newly, parties, woman, nowaccused, wife, young, estate, womenand, sex, pats, trump, trafficker, rear, watch, womans


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Five things to know about Christine Lagarde, the first woman to lead the European Central Bank

JOHN THYS | AFP | Getty ImagesChristine Lagarde is set to become the first female president of the European Central Bank later this year. The appointment of the former French finance minister marks only the latest step in a career notable for history-making moments. Rising through the ranks at her law firm, Lagarde specialized in labor law and anti-trust, as well as mergers and acquisitions. Mark Rutte Dutch prime ministerIn 2005, she left Baker McKenzie to jump deep into the world of politics a


JOHN THYS | AFP | Getty ImagesChristine Lagarde is set to become the first female president of the European Central Bank later this year. The appointment of the former French finance minister marks only the latest step in a career notable for history-making moments. Rising through the ranks at her law firm, Lagarde specialized in labor law and anti-trust, as well as mergers and acquisitions. Mark Rutte Dutch prime ministerIn 2005, she left Baker McKenzie to jump deep into the world of politics a
Five things to know about Christine Lagarde, the first woman to lead the European Central Bank Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, european, french, things, finance, female, woman, christine, tapie, imf, lagarde, lead, know, minister, law, central, bank, tough


Five things to know about Christine Lagarde, the first woman to lead the European Central Bank

International Monetary Fund (IMF) managing Director Christine Lagarde smiles during a press conference. JOHN THYS | AFP | Getty Images

Christine Lagarde is set to become the first female president of the European Central Bank later this year. The appointment of the former French finance minister marks only the latest step in a career notable for history-making moments.

1. Lawyer turned finance minister

Christine Lagarde was born in Paris and completed most of her studies in France. She graduated from law school at Paris Nanterre University. After being admitted to the Paris Bar, she joined the multinational law firm Baker McKenzie. Rising through the ranks at her law firm, Lagarde specialized in labor law and anti-trust, as well as mergers and acquisitions.

I know Christine Lagarde as the boss of the IMF, I know her as a tough lady, as somebody who knows what she wants, who is very clear on giving directions. Mark Rutte Dutch prime minister

In 2005, she left Baker McKenzie to jump deep into the world of politics as French minister for foreign trade. Within two years, she was appointed as finance and economy minister of France — becoming the first female chief of finance of a G-7 country.

2. The first IMF female chief

But her upward trajectory didn’t stop there: In 2011, she was nominated managing director of the International Monetary Fund — becoming the first woman to hold that position. She has led the Washington-based institution since then. Lagarde oversaw bailout programs for Greece, Portugal and Ireland during the sovereign debt crisis that peaked in 2001 and 2012. The three countries use the euro currency as members of the euro zone — meaning she knows the economies she’ll soon serve as central bank chief.

3. The first female ECB president

Earlier this month, representatives of 28 European countries selected her as the next president of the ECB, where her primary task will be to control inflation and enforce monetary policy decisions for the bloc. She is due to start her new job on November 1. “I know Christine Lagarde as the boss of the IMF. I know her as a tough lady, as somebody who knows what she wants, who is very clear on giving directions,” Mark Rutte, Dutch Prime Minister, told CNBC. “When you come to her to get a loan, (she is) very tough on conditions, so I wouldn’t like to be the European country who needs to go to the ECB asking for favors.”

4. The Tapie Affair

While finance minister of France, Lagarde reportedly stepped in to end a 14-year court dispute by ordering a panel of judges to arbitrate a case involving businessman Bernard Tapie — a friend of the French President, Nicolas Sarkozy. The case ended with an order on the French state to repay about 400 million euros in damages to Tapie.

Opponents say Lagarde interfered in the justice system. Supporters argue that the government would have faced a bigger bill if the process had dragged on. Lagarde’s subsequent decision not to appeal the panel’s bumper award to Tapie would later see her found guilty of negligence by a court that rules on cases of ministerial misconduct. Lagarde, who could have given up to one-year in prison and a 13,000 euro fine ($14,650), received no punishment.

5. Synchronized swimmer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, european, french, things, finance, female, woman, christine, tapie, imf, lagarde, lead, know, minister, law, central, bank, tough


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Carlos Ghosn’s wife recalls ‘horrific’ day of husband’s second arrest, accuses Nissan of ‘conspiracy’ and Japan of cruel and inhumane treatment

It was her husband’s second arrest accusing him of committing financial crimes while serving as Nissan’s CEO. “It’s devastating to think he’s being treated like, you know, a big criminal over an accusation that we still don’t understand what it is,” she said. “I think he’s devastated that a company that he loved and he worked so hard for could do this to him,” she said. Carole Ghosn also accused Nissan of orchestrating a conspiracy to avoid a merger with French automaker Renault. “A few people w


It was her husband’s second arrest accusing him of committing financial crimes while serving as Nissan’s CEO. “It’s devastating to think he’s being treated like, you know, a big criminal over an accusation that we still don’t understand what it is,” she said. “I think he’s devastated that a company that he loved and he worked so hard for could do this to him,” she said. Carole Ghosn also accused Nissan of orchestrating a conspiracy to avoid a merger with French automaker Renault. “A few people w
Carlos Ghosn’s wife recalls ‘horrific’ day of husband’s second arrest, accuses Nissan of ‘conspiracy’ and Japan of cruel and inhumane treatment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, nissan, think, japanese, husbands, inhumane, second, merger, ghosns, woman, wife, way, trial, hes, horrific, treatment, ghosn, recalls, husband


Carlos Ghosn's wife recalls 'horrific' day of husband's second arrest, accuses Nissan of 'conspiracy' and Japan of cruel and inhumane treatment

The last time Carole Ghosn saw her husband, former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, a team of 20 Japanese prosecutors stormed the couple’s apartment in Tokyo at 5:50 a.m. and hauled him away.

“They checked everything. They took pictures of everything,” she said in an exclusive interview with Sara Eisen that aired Wednesday on CNBC’s “Closing Bell. ”

She wasn’t even allowed to use the restroom alone, she said of the April arrest.

“They made this woman go into the bathroom with me to watch me,” she said, adding that the woman even entered the shower with her. “She even handed me the towel.”

“I think they wanted to humiliate us … to intimidate and humiliate us,” she said.

It was her husband’s second arrest accusing him of committing financial crimes while serving as Nissan’s CEO. He’s denied all accusations. Carole Ghosn said her husband, who’s spent at least 130 days in detention in a Japanese prison since November, was interrogated for eight hours every day without a lawyer.

Carole Ghosn is complaining publicly about what she characterized as “inhumane and cruel” treatment of the couple ahead of Japan’s first G-20 summit, which is being held in Osaka at the end of the month.

Carlos Ghosn was first arrested last November in Tokyo, facing allegations that he diverted Nissan funds to a Saudi businessman and friend, underreported his compensation, and engaged in a breach of trust tied to personal trading losses.

Ghosn stepped down as CEO of the Japanese carmaker in 2017. His trial on financial misconduct charges was expected to begin in September, but will be delayed.

Carole Ghosn said she’s hoping foreign leaders pressure Japanese officials to ensure her husband gets a fair trial. She also has been prohibited from seeing him while he’s in prison and said he was subjected to “emotional and mental abuse” in the Japanese detention center. Officers left the lights on all day and night, she said, adding that his cell was damp and cold without heat in the winter. She also said her husband was only allowed fresh air for 30 minutes Monday through Friday.

“It’s devastating to think he’s being treated like, you know, a big criminal over an accusation that we still don’t understand what it is,” she said.

Ghosn cannot leave Japan under the terms of his bail, which is set at 1 billion yen, or $9 million. The Japanese Ministry of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

“I think he’s devastated that a company that he loved and he worked so hard for could do this to him,” she said.

Carole Ghosn also accused Nissan of orchestrating a conspiracy to avoid a merger with French automaker Renault.

“We know it’s a conspiracy. Nissan did not want this merger,” she said.

“A few people within Nissan decided to get rid of my husband, that was the easiest way not to do the merger,” she said. “There was maybe a more civilized way of doing it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, japan, nissan, think, japanese, husbands, inhumane, second, merger, ghosns, woman, wife, way, trial, hes, horrific, treatment, ghosn, recalls, husband


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Woman who buys a lottery ticket every day just won a second time—for a total of $1.1 million

Two years ago, Peggy Dodson bought a lucky scratch-off lottery ticket at her local convenience store that turned out to be a $100,000 winner. Dodson, 72, recently walked into the same store where she bought her previous winning lottery ticket to claim a second prize — but this time, it was a $1 million jackpot. Dodson cried when she realized she’d won the lottery again, and an even bigger prize this time, according to a press release from Pennsylvania Lottery officials. “We’re going to pay our m


Two years ago, Peggy Dodson bought a lucky scratch-off lottery ticket at her local convenience store that turned out to be a $100,000 winner. Dodson, 72, recently walked into the same store where she bought her previous winning lottery ticket to claim a second prize — but this time, it was a $1 million jackpot. Dodson cried when she realized she’d won the lottery again, and an even bigger prize this time, according to a press release from Pennsylvania Lottery officials. “We’re going to pay our m
Woman who buys a lottery ticket every day just won a second time—for a total of $1.1 million Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, total, lottery, million, scratchoff, press, second, ticket, dodson, store, timefor, won, winning, prize, day, buys, pennsylvania, woman, pay


Woman who buys a lottery ticket every day just won a second time—for a total of $1.1 million

Two years ago, Peggy Dodson bought a lucky scratch-off lottery ticket at her local convenience store that turned out to be a $100,000 winner. But the Pennsylvania woman’s lucky streak was far from over.

Dodson, 72, recently walked into the same store where she bought her previous winning lottery ticket to claim a second prize — but this time, it was a $1 million jackpot.

Dodson cried when she realized she’d won the lottery again, and an even bigger prize this time, according to a press release from Pennsylvania Lottery officials.

“I cried, I couldn’t help it. I just thank God,” says Dodson, who also laid out the plans she and her husband, Ottis, have for their latest windfall. “We’re going to pay our mortgage off, we’ll pay our truck off and we’ll go to the Grand Canyon and Alaska!” Dodson says in the press release.

Dodson, who decided to buy her winning “Max-a-Million” ticket because she liked that the scratch-off was “the color purple,” told the Lancaster Online newspaper on Thursday that she usually buys her daily lottery ticket at the same store.

Buying lottery tickets is one of Dodson’s only vices, she says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, total, lottery, million, scratchoff, press, second, ticket, dodson, store, timefor, won, winning, prize, day, buys, pennsylvania, woman, pay


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Herman Cain withdraws from consideration for Fed board, Trump says

CNBC survey: Majority say Cain and Moore shouldn’t be confirmed to the Federal Reserve Board 12:29 PM ET Mon, 8 April 2019 | 04:07More importantly, Cain, like Trump, is an outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve, which Cain has accused in the past of “manipulating” the value of the U.S. dollar. In recent weeks, several White House officials expressed what could only be described as tepid support for Cain. There are also concerns among lawmakers and on Wall Street about Trump’s other contentious


CNBC survey: Majority say Cain and Moore shouldn’t be confirmed to the Federal Reserve Board 12:29 PM ET Mon, 8 April 2019 | 04:07More importantly, Cain, like Trump, is an outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve, which Cain has accused in the past of “manipulating” the value of the U.S. dollar. In recent weeks, several White House officials expressed what could only be described as tepid support for Cain. There are also concerns among lawmakers and on Wall Street about Trump’s other contentious
Herman Cain withdraws from consideration for Fed board, Trump says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: christina wilkie, tucker higgins, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, fed, cain, herman, board, woman, campaign, consideration, sexual, vote, moore, white, withdraws, accused


Herman Cain withdraws from consideration for Fed board, Trump says

CNBC survey: Majority say Cain and Moore shouldn’t be confirmed to the Federal Reserve Board 12:29 PM ET Mon, 8 April 2019 | 04:07

More importantly, Cain, like Trump, is an outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve, which Cain has accused in the past of “manipulating” the value of the U.S. dollar.

In addition to having repeatedly criticized the central bank, Cain has also weathered a series of scandals that first came to light during his 2012 presidential campaign but which would unquestionably have come up again in a Senate confirmation hearing.

In late 2011, Cain suspended his presidential campaign after it emerged that three women had accused him of workplace sexual harassment, a fourth woman accused him of sexual assault, and a fifth woman came forward to allege that she and Cain had carried out a 13-year-long extramarital affair. Cain has denied all the allegations.

The prospect of revisiting the allegations during a heated Senate confirmation hearing and having to publicly defend Cain likely held little appeal for the White House.

In recent weeks, several White House officials expressed what could only be described as tepid support for Cain. Larry Kudlow, the director of the National Economic Council, said this month that Cain was “in the vetting process, we will see how that turns out.”

There are also concerns among lawmakers and on Wall Street about Trump’s other contentious pick for the Fed board, conservative political activist and economics writer Stephen Moore.

It is unclear whether Republican senators will vote against Moore, who has had to contend with claims that he is unqualified for the Fed role as well as revelations about his messy divorce. Moore advised Trump during his 2016 campaign and co-authored a 2018 book called “Trumponomics: Inside the America First Plan to Revive Our Economy.”

WATCH: 4th GOP senator plans to vote against Cain for Fed


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: christina wilkie, tucker higgins, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, fed, cain, herman, board, woman, campaign, consideration, sexual, vote, moore, white, withdraws, accused


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