Britain’s top 100 firms have just 6 female CEOs and have ‘some way to go’ on equality

Britain’s biggest public companies have a long way to go when it comes to achieving gender equality in leadership, according to a new report. Researchers analyzed data related to 23,000 leadership positions at 350 of the U.K.’s largest publicly-listed companies, also known as FTSE 350. In 2016, the review set voluntary targets aimed at increasing the number of women in leadership positions at companies listed on London’s FTSE 350 index. According to the analysis, the combined proportion of femal


Britain’s biggest public companies have a long way to go when it comes to achieving gender equality in leadership, according to a new report.
Researchers analyzed data related to 23,000 leadership positions at 350 of the U.K.’s largest publicly-listed companies, also known as FTSE 350.
In 2016, the review set voluntary targets aimed at increasing the number of women in leadership positions at companies listed on London’s FTSE 350 index.
According to the analysis, the combined proportion of femal
Britain’s top 100 firms have just 6 female CEOs and have ‘some way to go’ on equality Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, executives, way, firms, biggest, equality, leadership, female, positions, senior, women, britains, 100, ftse, review, ceos, companies


Britain's top 100 firms have just 6 female CEOs and have 'some way to go' on equality

Britain’s biggest public companies have a long way to go when it comes to achieving gender equality in leadership, according to a new report.

The government-backed Hampton-Alexander Review in its latest report on gender and corporate leadership on Wednesday found that only six women held the top CEO position across the 100 biggest companies in the U.K.

Researchers analyzed data related to 23,000 leadership positions at 350 of the U.K.’s largest publicly-listed companies, also known as FTSE 350.

In 2016, the review set voluntary targets aimed at increasing the number of women in leadership positions at companies listed on London’s FTSE 350 index. A key objective was for 33% of board members, executives and senior managers reporting directly to executive committees to be women by the end of 2020.

According to the analysis, the combined proportion of female executives and senior managers at FTSE 100 companies — the 100 most valuable firms on London’s stock exchange — increased from 27% in 2018 to 28.6% this year.

Just 23% of executive committees in the 100 biggest firms were made up of women — that meant only 262 of the FTSE 100’s 1,135 executives were female.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, executives, way, firms, biggest, equality, leadership, female, positions, senior, women, britains, 100, ftse, review, ceos, companies


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Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business

Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat. In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention. One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business. Winning womenWomen are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top


Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat.
In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention.
One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business.
Winning womenWomen are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top
Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, help, tips, experience, business, rich, old, financial, youve, women, follow, starting, hannon, retirement, getty


Too old to get rich? No way, if you follow these 7 tips for starting a business

10’000 Hours | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Among other reasons, it’s hard to get back into the traditional workplace after age 50 if you were forced out. Starting your own business puts you back in the driver’s seat. In fact, with extra years under your belt, you have more of an edge than you think when it comes to starting a business, Hannon says.The 50-plus crowd has some advantages that don’t get enough attention. Here’s what to keep in mind before you strike out on your own.

1. Two top qualities

People who got into the game a little later have more capacity in several areas. No. 1: experience. “You’ve been through some ups and downs,” Hannon said. “You can bring some balance that a younger person can’t, who doesn’t have your world experience.” Next, you likely have the financial cushion to help you begin. “Most people who start are self-funded,” Hannon said. “It’s really critical to have that support underneath you.”

Be comfortable selling yourself. It’s all about sales. Kerry Hannon career transitions and retirement expert

You’ve got a network. “If you’re starting in an industry you’ve already worked in as customer or a client, you have a network to call on as potential clients and customers,” Hannon said.

2. Check your financial fitness

First, get a financial checkup. As someone with a few decades of work-world experience, you’ll understand the importance of paying down debt and drawing up a budget. Some people consider relocating to an area with a lower cost of living, Hannon says.

Maskot | Maskot | Getty Images

“Pay attention to the bigger-ticket items, not just cutting back on restaurant spending, to make sure you have that ability to be nimble,” Hannon said. One critical financial warning: Do not tap your retirement funds.That should be the absolute last resource you turn to fund a business.

3. Embrace what’s free

Take advantage of all the free resources you can. Hannon mentions SCORE, a partner of the Small Business Administration. This organization provides free business mentoring and education for those looking for experienced help from experienced entrepreneurs. Look for ways to reach out in your community, says Hannon. The internet also offers plenty of sites and templates for business plans.

Don’t make any rash moves. Do your homework to see what you can do. Kerry Hannon career transitions and retirement expert

4. Your value proposition

Look at the market and see what you have to contribute that no one else is doing. You can volunteer or moonlight, but find something that is as close to the work as possible to see if it will work for you. A scenario might sound great until you actually try it on. You might have to pick up some new skills or a certification. Without going as far as a master’s degree, it’s still worth thinking of ways to ramp up your professional profile.

5. Partner up

Consider a senior/junior partnership. Think “The Intern,” with Robert De Niro and Anne Hathaway.

Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

When an older entrepreneur pairs with someone younger, you get an unbeatable combination: They’ve got tech savvy and enthusiasm, and you have the capital, the resources and older, wiser contacts. You could build a business that goes on for 20 years. After all, you want a business that will grow slowly and organically, Hannon says.

6. Winning women

Women are especially good collaborators, Hannon says, and women over 50 are the top demographic worldwide starting businesses. Women may even have a higher success rate than men, according to a BNP Paribas study. “What makes women fabulous is, we are great collaborators,” Hannon said.

Ezra Bailey | Taxi | Getty Images

Women are also less focused on immediately hitting it out of the ballpark. Remember to put your pieces in place and ask for help, Hannon says, and be patient. “This isn’t a sprint,” Hannon said. “It’s a marathon.”

7. Sell it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, way, help, tips, experience, business, rich, old, financial, youve, women, follow, starting, hannon, retirement, getty


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Applications to business schools are down—but women are making modest gains

Still, U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications. But business schools are also calling attention to a silver lining. This year, total applications decreased by 3.1%, according to an annual survey of 1,145 graduate business programs by the Graduate Management Admission Council. The Forté Foundation hosts conferences and funds fellowships for women in MBA programs and partners with business schools to promote gender equity. According to their most recent survey of their 54 bus


Still, U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications.
But business schools are also calling attention to a silver lining.
This year, total applications decreased by 3.1%, according to an annual survey of 1,145 graduate business programs by the Graduate Management Admission Council.
The Forté Foundation hosts conferences and funds fellowships for women in MBA programs and partners with business schools to promote gender equity.
According to their most recent survey of their 54 bus
Applications to business schools are down—but women are making modest gains Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, school, mba, graduate, economy, average, schools, women, business, gains, downbut, modest, applications, gender, programs


Applications to business schools are down—but women are making modest gains

Workers with MBA degrees earn some of the highest wages in the country.

PayScale estimates that MBA holders earn roughly $87,000 per year on average, and The Financial Times estimates that the average salary for a recent business-school graduate is roughly $150,000. Both of these estimations are significantly higher what Americans make on average, which is closer to $50,000 per year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Still, U.S. business schools are seeing a major drop in applications.

But business schools are also calling attention to a silver lining. MBA programs enroll a higher percentage of women than ever before — a trend that some experts say may help close the gender pay gap and inequities in business.

This year, total applications decreased by 3.1%, according to an annual survey of 1,145 graduate business programs by the Graduate Management Admission Council.

There are several potential causes for the dip, including a strong economy and declining interest from international students.

“A decline in applications is probably somewhat cyclical,” Elissa Sangster, chief executive officer of the Forté Foundation, a non-profit focused on women’s advancement and gender parity in business school told CNBC Make It. “They always seem to rebound, especially if the economy goes into a bit of downturn. And I think that you’re seeing also perhaps a consolidation in terms of where students are sending applications.”

Anthony P. Carnevale, research professor and Director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, confirmed that trends in application volume at graduate business programs can typically be attributed to the strength of the current economy because workers are incentivized to continue working in a strong labor market.

“When the economy’s down, you should go to school — when there’s no hay to make,” he told CNBC Make It. “Now’s the time to get work experience. When the economy goes down, go back to school.”

Sangster is optimistic that MBA application volumes will rebound, but said the trend she is paying closest attention to is the percentage of women in business schools.

While women outnumber men at all levels of education, men still dominate business programs.

The Forté Foundation hosts conferences and funds fellowships for women in MBA programs and partners with business schools to promote gender equity. According to their most recent survey of their 54 business school partners, U.S. schools have roughly 39% women enrolled overall — up from 32% in 2011.

According to the Forté Foundation, in 2005 they did not observe a single business school that enrolled 40% women, and today they count at least 19 schools that have reached this threshold including Harvard Business School, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sangster hopes that the uptick in women business school students will help close the gender pay gap (which economists estimate is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man on average and is even wider for black, Latina and Native American women) and develop a pipeline of women who are undeniably qualified to enter the C-suite, which remains heavily dominated by men.

An MBA can “open up a lot of opportunities for women,” she said. “It can boost your salary, which I think can give you an economic advantage and economic mobility. It can give you the ability to transition careers and more easily move across industries.”

She continued, “We need more women in leadership. We need more women in the business world, and we think that that’s ultimately good for business. Return on investment, return on equity, those things are better when gender balance is strong at the top of a company.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, making, school, mba, graduate, economy, average, schools, women, business, gains, downbut, modest, applications, gender, programs


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Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups

Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company. “Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said. He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney). “I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch com


Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company.
“Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said.
He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney).
“I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch com
Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, competition, chamillionaire, pitch, talking, investor, startup, invest, women, white, 100000, minorityfounded, seriki, acquired, launches, grammy, rapper, startups


Grammy winning rapper Chamillionaire launches $100,000 competition for minority-founded start-ups

Grammy-award winning rapper and investor Hakeem “Chamillionaire” Seriki announced Monday on “Squawk Alley” that he and hip hop artist E-40 will invest $100,000 in a minority or woman founded start-up company.

“Being an entrepreneur isn’t easy, but it’s even harder for minority and women led companies,” Seriki said. “These people are solving new and unique problems and I think the only thing in their way is capital.”

Seriki was an early Lyft investor and remains bullish on the stock, while holding investments in more than 40 start-up companies. He previously invested in Ring (acquired by Amazon), Cruise (acquired by GM) and Maker Studios (acquired by Disney).

But this competition comes as part of the investor-slash-rapper’s larger push to bring awareness to a demographic of start-ups that he said have been historically underrepresented in the investment world.

Seriki highlighted the demographic divide in the venture capital landscape, citing a cultural trickle-down of funding from white male investors to white male led companies.

“When people say they can’t find African-American startups to invest in, it just sounds a little crazy to me,” Seriki said. “At one point I was getting 30 candidates a month, but when I said I only wanted to invest in women or minorities I started getting just two candidates a month.”

Start-ups will submit their pitches on Convoz, a face-to-face social app launched by Seriki in 2016 to enhance public collaborative communication.

Pitches submitted via the app with be reviewed by Seriki, his team and Republic.co, an SEC-registered platform that makes investing accessible to non-accredited investors.

All start-up leaders from diverse backgrounds are encourage to apply, with one word of advice from the award-winning artist.

“We’re not just talking about an idea. We’re talking about a real company,” Seriki said.

Seriki, E-40 and Republic.co will partner with “Shark Tank” investor Daymond John who will help the group narrow application to five finalists and choose a winner.

“I am so excited to be one of the judges in the $100,000 pitch competition,” John said. “If you feel that you are ready to pitch and knock it out of the park, I can not wait.”

The pitch competition will run from Nov. 11 to Dec. 6.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: brandon gomez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winning, competition, chamillionaire, pitch, talking, investor, startup, invest, women, white, 100000, minorityfounded, seriki, acquired, launches, grammy, rapper, startups


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Disgraced comedian Louis CK is going on a world tour — so much for cancel culture

It’s been two years since comedian Louis CK admitted in the New York Times that the allegations of lewd behavior made about him by several women were true. However, the current world tour is his most ambitious attempt yet to put his career back on track. When he admitted to the allegations against him, Louis CK became one of the most visible symbols of “cancel culture,” in which celebrities are boycotted and lose professional opportunities in response to allegations against them. Comedian, write


It’s been two years since comedian Louis CK admitted in the New York Times that the allegations of lewd behavior made about him by several women were true.
However, the current world tour is his most ambitious attempt yet to put his career back on track.
When he admitted to the allegations against him, Louis CK became one of the most visible symbols of “cancel culture,” in which celebrities are boycotted and lose professional opportunities in response to allegations against them.
Comedian, write
Disgraced comedian Louis CK is going on a world tour — so much for cancel culture Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: daniel bukszpan, in danielbukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stage, women, theres, louis, culture, york, comedian, world, times, cancel, disgraced, tour, going


Disgraced comedian Louis CK is going on a world tour — so much for cancel culture

Louis C.K. performs on stage as The New York Comedy Festival and The Bob Woodruff Foundation present the 10th Annual Stand Up for Heroes event at The Theater at Madison Square Garden on November 1, 2016 in New York City.

It’s been two years since comedian Louis CK admitted in the New York Times that the allegations of lewd behavior made about him by several women were true. He said in the statement that he planned to “step back and take a long time to listen,” but the Times reported on November 2 that the comedian is embarking on a world tour.

The tour started in Richmond, Va. and will see the comedian perform in such far-flung locations as Israel, Slovakia, and Hungary, as well as all over the United States.

These are not his first performances since running afoul of the #MeToo movement. He took the stage in August 2018 at Manhattan’s Comedy Cellar and has made other appearances since then. However, the current world tour is his most ambitious attempt yet to put his career back on track.

When he admitted to the allegations against him, Louis CK became one of the most visible symbols of “cancel culture,” in which celebrities are boycotted and lose professional opportunities in response to allegations against them. In his case, his film “I Love You, Daddy” was dropped from distribution and he lost his lead role in “The Secret Life of Pets 2.”

Now that he’s returning to the stage, it raises questions about the effectiveness of “cancel culture.” After all, is it accurate to say that he’s been “canceled” when he can wait a few months for the uproar to blow over and then go right back to performing?

According to culture critic and writer SJ Palm, host of the Popculty Podcast, the answer is yes, although it has more to do with information overload than anything else.

“In this day of the 24-hour news cycle, stories that would have dominated a year’s worth of media coverage a decade ago are breezed past within a day,” Palm said. “People lose track of time, and they forget how bad the crimes were, so they figure it’s probably been long enough… we should just be honest and call it ‘time-out culture.'”

Comedian, writer, and actor Kevin Allison said that if Louis CK wanted to return to the spotlight, there’s a historical precedent for the way he should have handled it.

“When the story about Louis broke in the Times a couple of years ago, I figured he’d lay low for two or three years, then come back with an hour-long show that was more soul-searching than dismissive, a show that dared to get serious,” he said. “There’s plenty of great moments in stand-up where someone like Richard Pryor came out and basically said something like, ‘Look, I regret something. There’s a solid reason for me to get real up here now and attempt to repair some damage.'”

He added that while Louis CK acknowledged that the stories his accusers told were true, the comedian could have done more to recognize the damage he did.

“Louis’s case is not on the level of, say, Bill Cosby’s,” Allison said. “But several women have said that this whole thing with Louis has had a negative effect on their lives. I don’t know what he’ll ultimately do on stage, but I’d respect him more if he didn’t act like those women were making much ado about nothing.”

Louis Carter, author and CEO of the Best Practice Institute think tank, said that if Louis CK’s “cancellation” seemed to end quickly, there’s a reason for that. He said that it’s in human nature to forgive, primarily because it feels good, and also because it’s easy to forgive when you’re not the victim.

“There are numerous studies on how forgiveness positively affects mood,” Carter said. “When the transgression is hypothetical to others, or others are far removed from the effects of the transgression, it is far easier to forgive.”

The real barometer of how welcome Louis CK’s return is will be the success or failure of his tour. If it sells out, then one can likely assume that he’s back in the public’s good graces. If he tells his jokes to the empty rooms of the world, then it probably means the opposite.

Whatever it means, author Collette McLafferty said that apart from choosing not to see the comedian perform, people who are still upset by his actions can take positive steps to offset that feeling.

“For anyone who is against Louis CK going on the road, I recommend taking that energy to actively seek out and support the projects of the women who told their stories instead – Dana Min Goodman, Julia Wolov, Rebecca Corey, and Abby Schachner,” she said. “They paved the way for women and men to come forward sooner than later.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: daniel bukszpan, in danielbukszpan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stage, women, theres, louis, culture, york, comedian, world, times, cancel, disgraced, tour, going


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There are now 2,101 billionaires globally – up almost 40% from five years ago

There are now some 2,101 billionaires globally — 589 individuals (or 38.9%) more than five years ago, according to UBS’s 2019 Billionaire Insights report. Over that same five-year period, their combined wealth grew by more than a third (34.5%) to reach a total of $8.5 trillion. As of year-end, the region was home to some 749 billionaires with a combined wealth of $3.6 trillion. With 754 billionaires, whose combined wealth totaled $2.5 trillion, the region represents 36% of the global billionaire


There are now some 2,101 billionaires globally — 589 individuals (or 38.9%) more than five years ago, according to UBS’s 2019 Billionaire Insights report.
Over that same five-year period, their combined wealth grew by more than a third (34.5%) to reach a total of $8.5 trillion.
As of year-end, the region was home to some 749 billionaires with a combined wealth of $3.6 trillion.
With 754 billionaires, whose combined wealth totaled $2.5 trillion, the region represents 36% of the global billionaire
There are now 2,101 billionaires globally – up almost 40% from five years ago Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, globally, growth, 2101, billionaire, asia, billionaires, women, combined, ago, wealth, number, trillion, region


There are now 2,101 billionaires globally – up almost 40% from five years ago

The world’s billionaire population continues to swell, despite the uber wealthy taking a hit to their bank balances last year, a new study has found.

There are now some 2,101 billionaires globally — 589 individuals (or 38.9%) more than five years ago, according to UBS’s 2019 Billionaire Insights report.

Over that same five-year period, their combined wealth grew by more than a third (34.5%) to reach a total of $8.5 trillion. The report covers the years 2013 to 2018.

Total billionaire wealth fell for the first time in five years during 2018 on the back of “a strong U.S. dollar, trade friction, fears of lower economic growth, and financial market volatility,” the Swiss bank found. Even still, billionaire wealth remained up $2.2 trillion from 2013.

American billionaires were the only ones who did not suffer a dip in 2018, with their wealth nudging up 0.1%. As of year-end, the region was home to some 749 billionaires with a combined wealth of $3.6 trillion.

The Asia Pacific region, however, remained home to the world’s greatest number of billionaires. With 754 billionaires, whose combined wealth totaled $2.5 trillion, the region represents 36% of the global billionaire population.

Within that, China accounts for 43% of the region’s billionaires. India makes up 14%, Hong Kong 9% and Japan just 4%.

In Europe, the Middle East and Africa’s billionaire population fell 5% last year to 598 individuals, whose combined wealth totaled $2.4 trillion.

The report also highlighted a notable uptick in the number of women joining the ranks. There are now 233 female billionaires globally, up 46% from the 160 recorded in 2013 and outpacing the 39% rate of growth displayed by their male counterparts over that period.

That growth was led largely by women in Asia and women entrepreneurs.

“While Asia continues to be seen as having more traditionally male-dominated cultures, it is heartening to see that the number of female billionaire has grown to more than double over the last five years,” Julia Leong, partner and private banking lead, noted in the report.

Don’t miss: There are more billionaires in NYC alone than there are in all of the UK or France

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, globally, growth, 2101, billionaire, asia, billionaires, women, combined, ago, wealth, number, trillion, region


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Women are more likely than men to do this financial favor for their partner

Women are more likely than men to take on their partner’s debt, the survey says: 53% of women reported having done so versus 47% of men. However, the amount of debt assumed by men when covering for their partner financially is roughly 50% higher on average than the amount taken on by women. Men and women differ in the types of debt they’re more likely to take on for their significant other, the study shows. 1 reason people end up acquiring their partner’s debt is through marriage. Douglas Bonepa


Women are more likely than men to take on their partner’s debt, the survey says: 53% of women reported having done so versus 47% of men.
However, the amount of debt assumed by men when covering for their partner financially is roughly 50% higher on average than the amount taken on by women.
Men and women differ in the types of debt they’re more likely to take on for their significant other, the study shows.
1 reason people end up acquiring their partner’s debt is through marriage.
Douglas Bonepa
Women are more likely than men to do this financial favor for their partner Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, significant, say, likely, financially, partner, debt, credit, men, partners, favor, financial, women


Women are more likely than men to do this financial favor for their partner

In the U.S., Americans have acquired an estimated $921 billion in debt belonging to a current or ex-partner. And those assuming responsibility over a significant other’s debt took on $23,238 on average. That’s according to a new survey from online comparison platform Finder. To determine the approximate amount of debt Americans have acquired on behalf of their partners, Finder asked over 2,000 U.S. adults ages 18 to 91 to share how much debt they’ve taken on from a past or current partner, why they took on that debt and what type of debt it is. Women are more likely than men to take on their partner’s debt, the survey says: 53% of women reported having done so versus 47% of men. However, the amount of debt assumed by men when covering for their partner financially is roughly 50% higher on average than the amount taken on by women. On average, men take on around $31,740 as a result of a romantic relationship, while women acquire just $15,681.

Men and women differ in the types of debt they’re more likely to take on for their significant other, the study shows. Women more commonly assume a partner’s debt if it’s a result of divorce settlements, the death of a partner or purchases made in their name, such as co-signing a loan or sharing a credit card. Men, on the other hand, are more likely to shoulder their partner’s debt if it results from purchases made via joint bank accounts, gambling problems or debt assumed through marriage. While the data shows that women are more likely to take on debt for their significant other, it isn’t clear why that may be. Since there isn’t a huge split between the percentage of men and women who were willing to take on their partner’s debt, experts say it could be a result of social norms or could just be coincidence. “Some may argue that women have a predisposition towards caretaking, but equally, others may argue that men have predisposition towards rescuing. Both tendencies might lead one to assume debt for someone they care for,” Priya Malani, founder of New York-based online financial services provider Stash Wealth, tells CNBC Make It.

Common reasons people assume their partner’s debt

Finder found that the No. 1 reason people end up acquiring their partner’s debt is through marriage. About a third of respondents say that getting married caused them to assume the other person’s debt. The second most common cause is purchases made in their name due to a shared credit card with 31.27%, followed by purchases made via joint bank accounts (21.05%), divorce settlements (19.5%) and the death of a partner (5.57%).

What is the source of the debt?

When partners take on each other’s debt, it most commonly comes from credit card spending, with 50.46% of respondents saying they paid off their significant other’s credit cards. In second place are car payments, with 24.15% of participants saying they covered their partner’s auto loan bills, followed by student loans (20.12%), medical bills (18.89%) and personal loans (18.27%).

How to avoid unnecessary debt from your partner

One in five Americans regret combining finances with their spouse or partner, and women are twice as likely to express their dissatisfaction regarding the way finances are managed in their relationship, according to a 2019 survey from MagnifyMoney. That means it’s essential that you and your partner are on the same page financially. While it might be difficult to say no to your partner if they need money, if assuming their debt could land you in a financially stressful situation, experts say you should weigh your options before agreeing to help. “Of course you want to support a partner both emotionally and financially. However, you also need to evaluate how you are protected in these situations, particularly if you’re unmarried and your break up wouldn’t be a divorce with the legal dividing up of assets and debts,” says Erin Lowry, author of “Broke Millennial Takes On Investing.” “Are you financially capable of taking over a co-signed loan? If you loan your partner money, is it okay if it doesn’t get paid back?” Douglas Boneparth, a certified financial planner and president of Bone Fide Wealth, says there are a number of factors you should consider before taking on a partner’s debt. “From credit scores to financial goals, it depends on what the partners want for themselves and what position they are currently in,” he explains. “Taking on debt without first understanding how it would affect you or your household is a misstep in and of itself. If the decision is not an informed one, don’t do it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, significant, say, likely, financially, partner, debt, credit, men, partners, favor, financial, women


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Why women own less start-up equity in Silicon Valley

Women working in Silicon Valley start-ups own just a quarter of the equity of their male colleagues, according to a report by software platform Carta. The report highlighted that both female start-up founders and employees owned just 26 cents of equity for every dollar held by men. Women made up a third of the participants in the study but held just 11% of the total equity wealth. Just one in eight start-up CEOs are women and the most highly compensated executive roles continued to be dominated


Women working in Silicon Valley start-ups own just a quarter of the equity of their male colleagues, according to a report by software platform Carta.
The report highlighted that both female start-up founders and employees owned just 26 cents of equity for every dollar held by men.
Women made up a third of the participants in the study but held just 11% of the total equity wealth.
Just one in eight start-up CEOs are women and the most highly compensated executive roles continued to be dominated
Why women own less start-up equity in Silicon Valley Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marketing, women, executive, roles, valley, startup, report, equity, silicon, study, founders, startups


Why women own less start-up equity in Silicon Valley

One reason for the lending disparity is that many of these women-owned businesses are young start-ups with a shorter track record and low credit scores.

Women working in Silicon Valley start-ups own just a quarter of the equity of their male colleagues, according to a report by software platform Carta.

The study, called “Table Stakes,” found this was due not only to there being fewer women in senior roles but more specifically the executive roles predominantly occupied by women, chief marketing officers (CMO) and chief operating officers (COO), were awarded less equity by the companies they work for than other “C-suite” positions.

This is the second gender equity gap report by Carta, which gathered data on equity ownership from more than 25,000 founders and 320,000 employees, in over 10,000 companies in the U.S. earlier this year.

The report highlighted that both female start-up founders and employees owned just 26 cents of equity for every dollar held by men.

Women made up a third of the participants in the study but held just 11% of the total equity wealth.

Just one in eight start-up CEOs are women and the most highly compensated executive roles continued to be dominated by men.

Chief marketing officer was the executive role where women were the best represented, at 32%. However, CMOs were the worst compensated in terms of equity of all executive roles, receiving an average two-fifths less than CFOs.

Finance roles saw the biggest boost equity reward between lower-level and C-suite jobs, increasing by 26 times, yet the number of women in this area plummeted by 70% as seniority increased.

Women accounted for less than a fifth of engineers in start-ups, the lowest representation of gender diversity of any team in the study. However, engineers were on average awarded more than double the equity of any other department, when comparing junior and mid-level employees.

“Women aren’t in the right roles at the right time in a company’s lifecycle,” said Emily Kramer, vice president of marketing at Carta, explaining that women aren’t in these positions that get “outsized equity” like founders, investors and early engineers.

Kramer added: “We need to take a hard look at how the startup and VC (venture capital) ecosystem values the work and talents of women. We can do better.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, marketing, women, executive, roles, valley, startup, report, equity, silicon, study, founders, startups


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Ginsburg, in book, questions confidential #MeToo agreements

A new book on Ruth Bader Ginsburg explores the Supreme Court justice’s thoughts on the #MeToo movement and her hope that non-disclosure agreements, which have come under fire in sexual misconduct cases, “will not be enforced by the courts.” In “Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law,” the 86-year-old feminist icon questions whether the #MeToo movement will render the secrecy clause obsolete in such cases. Some lawyers who represent women today in sexual misco


A new book on Ruth Bader Ginsburg explores the Supreme Court justice’s thoughts on the #MeToo movement and her hope that non-disclosure agreements, which have come under fire in sexual misconduct cases, “will not be enforced by the courts.”
In “Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law,” the 86-year-old feminist icon questions whether the #MeToo movement will render the secrecy clause obsolete in such cases.
Some lawyers who represent women today in sexual misco
Ginsburg, in book, questions confidential #MeToo agreements Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questions, sexual, nondisclosure, agreements, women, cases, settlements, ginsburg, misconduct, book, confidential, movement, metoo


Ginsburg, in book, questions confidential #MeToo agreements

A new book on Ruth Bader Ginsburg explores the Supreme Court justice’s thoughts on the #MeToo movement and her hope that non-disclosure agreements, which have come under fire in sexual misconduct cases, “will not be enforced by the courts.”

Several women have spoken out about their encounters with disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and other high-profile men despite the financial and legal risk of violating the agreements. Others, including former Fox news anchor Gretchen Carlson, want to be released from the confidentiality clauses, concluding they only serve to cover up abuse and keep victims silent.

In “Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law,” the 86-year-old feminist icon questions whether the #MeToo movement will render the secrecy clause obsolete in such cases.

“One interesting thing is whether it will be an end to the confidentiality pledge. Women who complained and brought suit were offered settlements in which they would agree that they would never disclose what they had complained about,” Ginsburg said at a February 2018 event at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia that’s included in the book.

“I suspect we will not see those agreements anymore,” she said at the time.

Ginsburg revised her thoughts in edits made this year, according to the book, which was written by National Constitution Center President Jeffrey Rosen and released Tuesday.

“I hope those agreements will not be enforced by courts,” Ginsburg added.

Ginsburg had championed equal protection for women in the 1970s as co-founder of the Women’s Rights Projects at the American Civil Liberties Union.

Some lawyers who represent women today in sexual misconduct cases, including Debra Katz and Gloria Allred, pushed back on Ginsburg’s view of the non-disclosure agreements, known as “NDAs.” They called them essential to securing settlements and protecting their clients’ privacy.

“Employers would not be willing to pay the kind of settlement that they pay now if they believe that all other employees would know about [it],” said Katz, who represented Christine Blasey Ford in her Senate testimony against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Katz also fears the disclosures would make it hard for her clients to find work again.

For Carlson, the secrecy has left her unable to take part in media coverage of her lawsuit against Fox News. She received a reported $20 million settlement in 2016 after claiming late Fox News chief Roger Ailes fired her after she rejected his sexual advances.

“It’s really through NDAs [non-disclosure agreements] and through other means of settling these kinds of cases of sexual harassment that we keep women silent,” Carlson told The Associated Press on Saturday.

Until that changes, she said, “we’re not going to eradicate this problem.”

Katz, though, insists it’s not up to victims to change the culture.

“The onus should be not on the person who’s brought a claim to protect women in the future from sexual harassment. That’s the job of the employer,” Katz said.

Fox did not respond to requests for comment on the issue this week.

NBC Universal, in the wake of Ronan Farrow’s reports that the company had buried a string of sexual misconduct claims with confidential settlements, announced Oct. 25 that it would release NBC News employees “from that perceived obligation” if they contacted the company.

Time’s Up and other #MeToo activists lauded the move, but questioned why the accusers had to meet with the company at all.

At least two states, New York and California, have placed limits on the use of NDAs in sexual misconduct cases since the #MeToo movement took off in 2017. The New York law allows them only if the victim prefers it.

But Allred, for one, sees no signs that courts will stop enforcing them. Often times, they’re sent straight to arbitration, she said.

Weinstein, who’s awaiting trial in January on rape and sexual assault charges, is not known to have sought damages from anyone speaking out.

At least one celebrity has, though not successfully.

Comedian Bill Cosby, as he awaited trial in 2016, filed suit against victim Andrea Constand, her mother and her lawyer after they cooperated with authorities who had reopened the case, a decade after he paid Constand a confidential $3.4 million settlement.

“We were adamant that you couldn’t do that,” said Constand’s lawyer Dolores Troiani, who said the agreement preserved their right to talk to police. “That is against public policy.”

Cosby, who later withdrew the complaint, was convicted last year and is now in prison.

Ginsburg, in a 2018 conversation recounted in the book, said she expects the #MeToo movement to have staying power, and any backlash to be limited.

“There are still advances, a way forward, and I do think the more women there are in positions of authority, the less likely that setbacks will occur,” Ginsburg said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, questions, sexual, nondisclosure, agreements, women, cases, settlements, ginsburg, misconduct, book, confidential, movement, metoo


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New report from members of The Washington Post’s union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. Office of the Washington Post on M


A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff.
All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019.
Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members.
Office of the Washington Post on M
New report from members of The Washington Post’s union shows women and people of color are paid less Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, members, post, paid, employees, company, women, posts, guild, report, union, shows, color, men, study, data, pay


New report from members of The Washington Post's union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. The study, which looks at pay disparities in both the newsroom and in the commercial division, says that “women as a group are paid less than men” and that “women of color in the newsroom receive $30,000 [per year] less than white men.” All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. He tells CNBC Make It via email that he hopes the data will move the company closer to achieving pay equity.

Office of the Washington Post on May 03, 2012, in Washington, United States. The Washington Post is an American daily newspaper. Thomas Imo | Photothek | Getty Images

“The Post has been on a hiring spree in recent years, and one thing we’ve heard from many members of the Guild was that they’d like to better understand pay across the organization,” he says. “The Post has never conducted and released to the public a comprehensive pay study, so The Guild felt it was time to do so again since it had been three years since the last such study.” In addition to highlighting a pay gap among women and people of color, the study also found that the pay disparity between men and women is most prevalent in journalists under the age of 40. Based on the data, the median salary for men and women over 40 in the newsroom is $127,765 per year and $126,000 per year, respectively. That’s a 1.5% gap. But, when looking at journalists under 40, that gap widens to 14% with men earning $95,890 per year, compared to women earning $84,030 per year. For young employees of color, the study found that on average they make 7% less than white journalists, with median salaries of $84,780 and $90,780, respectively. In a series of testimonies given by employees, one 35-year-old award-winning journalist says she started her career as an intern at the company in the mid-2000s. Recently, she says, she found out that all of the men on her team are paid more than she is, despite her having more experience than most of them. One of the men, she says, even makes $30,000 more than she does. The journalist continues by saying that the only time she received a significant raise at the company was when a competitor presented her with another job offer several years ago. “It’s always disgusted me that the only way we can get what we deserve is by getting an offer somewhere else,” she says. “How is that a way to show that you value someone?”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attends the Amazon Prime Video’s Golden Globe Awards After Party in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 6, 2019. Emma McIntyre | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, members, post, paid, employees, company, women, posts, guild, report, union, shows, color, men, study, data, pay


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