After elections, Japan’s leader Abe will be seeking a big win on trade

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his ruling coalition party are set for a victory at the polls on Sunday. Next, he’ll be seeking out a big win in his dealings with other countries — such as trade, according to analysts. Major post-election priorities would include trade talks with the U.S., as well as tackling the ongoing wartime forced labor dispute with South Korea that has spilled over into trade, they said. Those talks with the U.S. are going to be first on the agenda for Abe, accordin


Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his ruling coalition party are set for a victory at the polls on Sunday. Next, he’ll be seeking out a big win in his dealings with other countries — such as trade, according to analysts. Major post-election priorities would include trade talks with the U.S., as well as tackling the ongoing wartime forced labor dispute with South Korea that has spilled over into trade, they said. Those talks with the U.S. are going to be first on the agenda for Abe, accordin
After elections, Japan’s leader Abe will be seeking a big win on trade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leader, south, going, wartime, big, elections, harris, trade, korea, win, japans, japanese, seeking, abe, talks, women


After elections, Japan's leader Abe will be seeking a big win on trade

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his ruling coalition party are set for a victory at the polls on Sunday. Next, he’ll be seeking out a big win in his dealings with other countries — such as trade, according to analysts.

Major post-election priorities would include trade talks with the U.S., as well as tackling the ongoing wartime forced labor dispute with South Korea that has spilled over into trade, they said.

“Abe is looking for a big foreign policy win. He wants to solve one of these long-standing issues, whether it is territorial disputes with Russia, the abductee issue with North Korea, now finding a way out of the U.S.-Japan trade talks with the U.S.-Japan relations intact, ” said Tobias Harris, senior vice president at advisory company Teneo.

Tackling such major foreign policy issues will be taking up most of Abe’s focus going forward, he concluded.

Those talks with the U.S. are going to be first on the agenda for Abe, according to Harris. Both countries are reportedly working on a trade deal which could involve Japan offering American farmers new access to its markets in exchange for Washington reducing tariffs on certain Japanese auto parts.

The U.S. “is going to insist on trying to get some sort of partial deal done that focuses on agriculture, to give (Donald) Trump a political victory heading into 2020, ” said Harris, referring to the U.S. elections in 2020.

Meanwhile, amid the dispute with Seoul, Abe’s tough stance in imposing restrictions on exports of high-tech materials to South Korea — used by its critical tech sector — has been “certainly popular” with his party supporters who hold “a lot of bitter feelings,” said Harris.

Tensions with South Korea have rapidly worsened in recent weeks over the treatment of “comfort women” — women forced to work in Japanese wartime brothels — as well as the compensation of South Korean labor during World War II.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leader, south, going, wartime, big, elections, harris, trade, korea, win, japans, japanese, seeking, abe, talks, women


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Nike wins big as the US women’s soccer team takes the World Cup

Megan Rapinoe #15 of the United States celebrates scoring during the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup France quarter-final match between France and the United States at Parc des Princes on June 28, 2019 in Paris, France. With the U.S. women’s national soccer team defeating the Netherlands 2-0 Sunday to take the 2019 Women’s World Cup, Nike is also winning, with jerseys selling out on its website and buzz around its latest ad campaign taking over the internet. Nike said jersey sales have surged 200% c


Megan Rapinoe #15 of the United States celebrates scoring during the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup France quarter-final match between France and the United States at Parc des Princes on June 28, 2019 in Paris, France. With the U.S. women’s national soccer team defeating the Netherlands 2-0 Sunday to take the 2019 Women’s World Cup, Nike is also winning, with jerseys selling out on its website and buzz around its latest ad campaign taking over the internet. Nike said jersey sales have surged 200% c
Nike wins big as the US women’s soccer team takes the World Cup Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, nikes, team, women, soccer, big, womens, tournament, jersey, cup, world, nike, sales, wins


Nike wins big as the US women's soccer team takes the World Cup

Megan Rapinoe #15 of the United States celebrates scoring during the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup France quarter-final match between France and the United States at Parc des Princes on June 28, 2019 in Paris, France.

By Monday morning, a special version dropped by Nike Sunday evening of the women’s jersey with four stars — with each star representing a World Cup win for the women’s team: once in 1991, 1999, 2015 and this year — had already sold out in many sizes for women, men and kids, a spokeswoman confirmed to CNBC.

The brand sponsored 14 of the two dozen teams playing in the tournament this year, including three that made it to the final four. One of those is team USA. Professional soccer players make up Nike’s second-largest group of sponsored female athletes, behind track and field.

With the U.S. women’s national soccer team defeating the Netherlands 2-0 Sunday to take the 2019 Women’s World Cup, Nike is also winning, with jerseys selling out on its website and buzz around its latest ad campaign taking over the internet.

Nike’s U.S. 2019 Stadium Home jersey for women is already sold out in most sizes, according to its website.

CEO Mark Parker had told analysts last month that the USA women’s home jersey, in the midst of the tournament, had already become the top-selling soccer jersey, for both men and women, ever sold on Nike’s website in one season.

Nike said jersey sales have surged 200% compared with the last tournament held four years ago. It said sales of women’s apparel related to the tournament are up more than 150% compared with 2015.

“To start the tournament nearly two-thirds of the teams wore Nike kits and half the players wore our boots,” Parker told analysts in late June. “The exposure is driving outstanding sell-through in kits, high performance bras and lifestyle extensions.”

Nike could use the boost from the World Cup win, as it’s been trying to sell more to women overall but has faced some backlash for its treatment of its female employees and sponsored athletes.

More recently, it was an op-ed in The New York Times that Olympic athlete Allyson Felix wrote, saying Nike wanted to pay her 70% less for her contract after she had a child. Nike responded shortly after by saying it was putting an end to financial penalties for pregnant athletes. And the uproar seems to not have put a dent in sales, which jumped 4% in the latest quarter to just over $10 billion.

Meanwhile, as sales of Nike’s new World Cup merchandise are skyrocketing — with many items being bought and worn by men — it has provided more fuel for the ongoing debate around the fact that female soccer players are still being paid less than men. But women’s games are now generating more revenue than men’s games.

In 2016, women’s games generated $1.9 million more in sales than men’s games, according to audited financial statements from the U.S. Soccer Federation (USSF) obtained by The Wall Street Journal. From 2016 to 2018, women’s games generated roughly $50.8 million in revenue, compared with $49.9 million for men’s games, WSJ found.

After the win on Sunday, Nike aired a new ad for the women’s soccer team, hinting at some of these frustrations.

In it, a woman says: “I believe that we will make our voices heard and TV shows will be talking about us every single day and not just once every four years. … And that women will conquer more than just the soccer field, like breaking every single glass ceiling and having their faces carved on Mount Rushmore. … And that we will keep fighting not just to make history, but to change it forever.”

“The Nike brand is about winning, and it’s gender-neutral in this way,” said Erich Joachimsthaler, CEO and founder of branding agency Vivaldi.

“The new ad … when they talk about women and the win [Sunday], they’re not talking about it in some beautified way. Some pink way,” Joachimsthaler said. “They’re talking about it like it’s serious. Like you deserve it. You, women, are the best.”

Nike, which pulls in less than a quarter of its sales from women today, says the momentum from the World Cup gives it a nice boost and sets the stage for its initiatives for the remainder of the year. These include its upcoming launch of geography-specific clothing for women in Asia, based on studies it did around female body types and sizing.

“We can feel the World Cup’s energy and impact throughout our growing women’s business,” said Rosemary St. Clair, the head of Nike’s women’s division. “We’re ecstatic about how this summer has contributed to the acceleration of our women’s offense at Nike.”

Nike shares were up less than 1% Monday morning. The stock has rallied more than 17% this year, bringing Nike’s market cap to roughly $138 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, takes, nikes, team, women, soccer, big, womens, tournament, jersey, cup, world, nike, sales, wins


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tension between Japan and South Korea is rising, and it looks set to drag down trade

Additionally, Tokyo removed South Korea from the list of “white countries” — countries that Japan deems to have trustworthy export control systems. The recent tensions between the two countries stem from more than six decades of resentment from South Korea toward Japan. Souring relationsTokyo’s changes to its approach to South Korean trade went into effect on Thursday, and Japanese exporters are now required to apply for licenses for some individual shipments to South Korea. Seaman wrote that th


Additionally, Tokyo removed South Korea from the list of “white countries” — countries that Japan deems to have trustworthy export control systems. The recent tensions between the two countries stem from more than six decades of resentment from South Korea toward Japan. Souring relationsTokyo’s changes to its approach to South Korean trade went into effect on Thursday, and Japanese exporters are now required to apply for licenses for some individual shipments to South Korea. Seaman wrote that th
Tension between Japan and South Korea is rising, and it looks set to drag down trade Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, export, countries, seaman, set, trade, drag, looks, japanese, women, tension, korea, rising, korean, south, japan


Tension between Japan and South Korea is rising, and it looks set to drag down trade

South Korean President Moon Jae-In (R) walks after he was greeted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the G-20 Summit in June 2019. Kim Kyung-Hoon | AFP | Getty Images

Tensions between Tokyo and Seoul intensified on Friday when Japan’s prime minister imposed new restrictions on exports that could hit South Korea’s tech industry. In response, some Koreans called for a boycott on Japanese goods. As the United States and China, the world’s two largest economies, continue hashing out their wide-ranging tariff battle. Two of Asia’s major economic players appear to be nearing their own trade war over political disputes. “The two governments will engage in a tit-for-tat exchange of retaliatory measures for at least the several months that further sours bilateral relations,” Scott Seaman, director for Asia at political consultancy Eurasia Group, said in a Sunday note. The latest escalation seems in part to have been caused by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in failing to make progress on outstanding disagreements at last month’s G-20 summit. According to Seaman, Abe “appears to have been particularly irked” by the failure to resolve “differences over the handling of recent South Korean court rulings awarding damages to Koreans claiming to have been forced to work for Japanese firms during World War II.”

Japan imposes trade tariffs

Last Monday, Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry issued a statement that Tokyo “will apply updated licensing policies and procedures on the export and transfer of controlled items and their relevant technologies to (South Korea).” “Through careful consideration among the relevant ministries in Japan, the Government of Japan cannot help but state that the Japan-(South Korea) relationship of trust including in the field of export control and regulation has been significantly undermined,” the statement said. Additionally, Tokyo removed South Korea from the list of “white countries” — countries that Japan deems to have trustworthy export control systems. The recent tensions between the two countries stem from more than six decades of resentment from South Korea toward Japan. During the Japanese occupation of the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945, many Korean woman were forced into sex work in military brothels. The term “comfort women” has often been used by Japan as a euphemism for all the women forced into sex work in the region during WWII. Japan apologized to the women as part of a 2015 deal and provided a 1 billion yen, approximately $9.4 million, fund to help them. But advocacy groups for “comfort women” in Korea have criticized the fund, and the South Korean government on Friday dissolved the fund despite Japan’s warnings that such action could damage bilateral ties.

Souring relations

Tokyo’s changes to its approach to South Korean trade went into effect on Thursday, and Japanese exporters are now required to apply for licenses for some individual shipments to South Korea. That will include exports of chemicals mostly used for making refrigerants, pharmaceutical intermediates, metals manufacturing, and sometimes semi-conductor preparations. Seaman wrote that the “change is expected (and arguably intended) to complicate and slow the process of exporting these goods from Japan to South Korea.” “Bulk licenses can, in principle, cover three years of shipments,” he added. “In contrast, applying for an export license for individual shipments can take 90 days or so to complete, with no guarantee of success, thus creating more uncertainty and potential costs.”

A container is unload onto a truck at the international cargo terminal at Tokyo’s port on May 16, 2019. Alessandro Di Ciomm | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Meanwhile, the removal of South Korea from Japan’s list of “white countries” is set to go into effect in late August. “Broadly speaking, the current group of 27 white countries are those that Japan considers to have strict export control regimes and with which it can hold regular discussions on such matters,” said Seaman. He added that Japan normally tries to discuss with “white countries” the handling of such items at least once every two years. Seaman pointed out that “Tokyo and Seoul have reportedly had only one such exchange since 2016, and none since Moon took office in May 2017.” That, he added, further underpins “the Abe government’s argument that trust in this area has broken down.”

Implications of an Asian trade war


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-08  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, export, countries, seaman, set, trade, drag, looks, japanese, women, tension, korea, rising, korean, south, japan


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This year’s red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public

In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America. Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public. “Female CEO


In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America. Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public. “Female CEO
This year’s red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: leslie picker christopher hayes, leslie picker, christopher hayes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, women, julie, seen, realreal, ceos, startups, public, capital, female, red, usual, hot, ipo, market


This year's red hot IPO market has seen more women CEOs than usual take companies public

Julie Wainwright (C), CEO of The RealReal Inc. takes part in the company’s IPO at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, June 28, 2019.

The boom in initial public offerings this year has also been a boon for women chief executive officers.

In the first half of the year, 13 women CEOs have taken companies public. They include Julie Wainwright of the RealReal, Jennifer Tejada of PagerDuty, and Jenny Zhiya Qian of Luckin Coffee.

Women chief executives represent 15 percent of the total CEOs that underwent IPOs in 2019 — according to data compiled by CNBC — the highest proportion for any year going back to at least 2014.

That proportion is triple the level of female CEOs in the Russell 3000, meaning that if the trend holds, it could help boost the percentage of women running public companies in America.

”It undeniably took extra courage to invest in these talented-though-female leaders a few years back,” said Lise Buyer, founder of Class V Group, a firm that advises companies on IPOs. ”In 2019, institutional investors have clearly demonstrated their enthusiasm for businesses with attractive growth prospects regardless of whether their CEO is Jim or Julie or Jennifer or John.”

Women CEOs are less likely to take companies public, in part, because they’re less likely to receive venture capital. Last year, companies founded solely by women garnered 2.3 percent of the total capital invested in venture-backed startups, according to PitchBook data. Often times — although not always — founders of startups become CEOs that one day take their companies public.

At least in the past, studies have also shown a gender bias during the IPO process that favors male executives.

One study conducted by the University of Utah five years ago found that women CEOs are disadvantaged by the process due to the judgment of professional investors, who are typically men.

“Despite identical personal qualifications and firm financials, firms led by female CEOs may be hamstrung in terms of their ability to take a company public,” the study said. “Female CEOs are evaluated more negatively and suffer less potential for growth capital during a liquidity event.”

Still, over the last year, there’s been a larger movement toward backing women entrepreneurs, and sizable startups like Rent The Runway and Glossier have female CEOs that may one day choose to embark on initial public offerings of their own.

IPOs are doing great this year with the Renaissance IPO ETF, which measures recent stocks that have recently gone public, up 37% this year, compared to a 19% return for the S&P 500. RealReal is the latest example, up more than 27% since its debut a week ago.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: leslie picker christopher hayes, leslie picker, christopher hayes
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, women, julie, seen, realreal, ceos, startups, public, capital, female, red, usual, hot, ipo, market


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Sophia Amoruso’s Girlboss networking platform wants to help professional women find their peers

Sophia Amoruso wants to help the next generation of professional women find each other. At the fifth Girlboss Rally this weekend in Los Angeles, Amoruso announced that her latest venture, Girlboss Media, has launched a free professional networking platform where working women can connect. The Girlboss network is the latest business platform to enter the networking space for professional millennial women, joining others like The Wing and Bumble Bizz. “I love how many platforms are being built for


Sophia Amoruso wants to help the next generation of professional women find each other. At the fifth Girlboss Rally this weekend in Los Angeles, Amoruso announced that her latest venture, Girlboss Media, has launched a free professional networking platform where working women can connect. The Girlboss network is the latest business platform to enter the networking space for professional millennial women, joining others like The Wing and Bumble Bizz. “I love how many platforms are being built for
Sophia Amoruso’s Girlboss networking platform wants to help professional women find their peers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: libbi farrow elizabeth gravier, libbi farrow, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, platform, help, told, build, sophia, network, wants, peers, networking, amorusos, amoruso, professional, girlboss, women


Sophia Amoruso's Girlboss networking platform wants to help professional women find their peers

Sophia Amoruso wants to help the next generation of professional women find each other.

At the fifth Girlboss Rally this weekend in Los Angeles, Amoruso announced that her latest venture, Girlboss Media, has launched a free professional networking platform where working women can connect. Women entrepreneurs, creatives and freelancers will be able to build their own profiles on the Girlboss network, Girlboss.com, and find others to help them build their businesses and careers.

“Our hope is that Girlboss will be the largest digital network of women to take control of their careers, money and lives and will continue to do that through our award-winning content and experiences,” Amoruso told CNBC Make It via email.

The Girlboss platform will also include “ask me anything” sessions where businesswomen like Arianna Huffington and Beth Comstock, former vice chair of General Electric, will lead weekly digital fireside chats.

Amoruso told Good Morning America that the Girlboss platform will be a place where women “can share not just what they do but who they are, in a world where we’re not LinkedIn Monday through Friday and Instagram Saturday and Sunday – we’re so much more than that.”

The Girlboss network is the latest business platform to enter the networking space for professional millennial women, joining others like The Wing and Bumble Bizz. According to Girlboss, more than 54,000 people have joined its waitlist. Though the platform is geared toward women, it is open to anyone and membership is free.

“I love how many platforms are being built for women, and believe that all ships rise with the tide,” Amoruso told CNBC Make It. “I’m proud that Girlboss doesn’t require an application or membership fees, because often the women who need this type of support most are those who can least afford to pay for it. Girlboss is a space for every woman to build her network, her business, her career – and to find like-minded women who help get her there.”

While a mobile app is still in the works, the network is live at Girlboss.com and as a web app.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss: Nasty Gal founder and Girlboss CEO Sophia Amoruso: ‘Women are beginning to write our own history’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: libbi farrow elizabeth gravier, libbi farrow, elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, platform, help, told, build, sophia, network, wants, peers, networking, amorusos, amoruso, professional, girlboss, women


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

The 10 best CEOs for women, according to Comparably

Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame. This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt C


Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame. This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt C
The 10 best CEOs for women, according to Comparably Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, ceos, according, comparably, ceo, employees, receive, women, list, best, reviews, large


The 10 best CEOs for women, according to Comparably

Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks.

Looking at responses for more than 60,000 organizations, Comparably focused on how female employees rated company culture and their CEO’s management style on a scale of one to 10. To qualify, CEOs of large companies with 500 employees or more had to receive a minimum of 75 reviews between June 7th, 2018 and June 7th, 2019. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame.

This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. 6 last year. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella dropped to No. 19 on the list this year, after coming in at No. 2 last year. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Apple’s Tim Cook, and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos all landed outside the top 20.

Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt CEO Kelly Caruso, at No. 6, and Deloitte CEO Cathy Engelbert at No. 9 (Engelbert will start a new role as commissioner of the WNBA on July 17.)

Take a look below to see which leaders are the 10 list of best CEOs for women, according to Comparably:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, ceos, according, comparably, ceo, employees, receive, women, list, best, reviews, large


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Want a job? Ramit Sethi says not to do this. Plus, career advice from Mark Cuban, Sheryl Sandberg, Suzy Welch and Mika Brzezinski

Ramit Sethi: Doing this won’t get you a jobRamit Sethi Jemal Countess | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty ImagesNo responses to the resumes you send out? Sheryl Sandberg: Speak upSheryl Sandberg David A. Grogan | CNBCDon’t wait to become a leader, Sheryl Sandberg tells young women just starting out in the work world. “You can make a difference from your first day in the office,” said Sandberg, COO of Facebook and author of “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.” “Don’t stress about your f


Ramit Sethi: Doing this won’t get you a jobRamit Sethi Jemal Countess | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty ImagesNo responses to the resumes you send out? Sheryl Sandberg: Speak upSheryl Sandberg David A. Grogan | CNBCDon’t wait to become a leader, Sheryl Sandberg tells young women just starting out in the work world. “You can make a difference from your first day in the office,” said Sandberg, COO of Facebook and author of “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.” “Don’t stress about your f
Want a job? Ramit Sethi says not to do this. Plus, career advice from Mark Cuban, Sheryl Sandberg, Suzy Welch and Mika Brzezinski Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mika, mark, sethi, sandberg, ramit, suzy, job, getty, women, mavericks, welch, advice, plus, speak, work, cuban, sheryl


Want a job? Ramit Sethi says not to do this. Plus, career advice from Mark Cuban, Sheryl Sandberg, Suzy Welch and Mika Brzezinski

Career advice is like shoes. You’ve got to try it on and walk around in it to see if it fits. Dress for the job you want … Know everyone’s name … Ask questions when you don’t know something … There’s plenty of trite advice floating around. But what’s really going to help you? For some insight, look to those who have achieved something substantial. Sometimes the advice is surprising. It may even sound counterintuitive. “Don’t make waves” might seem like commonsense when it comes to nailing your job, but it may also work against you. Some advice may seem like it’ll make you uncomfortable. Try it on anyway. It might feel better than you think. Here’s how to build great workplace relationships, job hunt and keep your sanity while you navigate a new professional landscape.

Ramit Sethi: Doing this won’t get you a job

Ramit Sethi Jemal Countess | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

No responses to the resumes you send out? “You need to change your approach,” said Ramit Sethi, personal finance coach and author of “I Will Teach You To Be Rich.” The best jobs are not found by sending resumes to what Sethi calls the “black hole of doom,” but through networking and relationships. And make sure to zero in with surgical precision on your desired job title and company. “You should be able to say, ‘I want to be a marketing manager at a B2B company in the Bay Area, with this many employees,'” Sethi said. A handful of companies will fit those parameters. Sethi advises hunting them down, either by finding connections on LinkedIn or building them. “Take people out for coffee before you send a resume,” he said. “That’s how your resume gets to the top of the pile.”

Sheryl Sandberg: Speak up

Sheryl Sandberg David A. Grogan | CNBC

Don’t wait to become a leader, Sheryl Sandberg tells young women just starting out in the work world. “You can make a difference from your first day in the office,” said Sandberg, COO of Facebook and author of “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.” “Sit at the table; let your voice be heard.” From an early age, Sandberg said, many women are discouraged from leading. In the classroom, girls are called on less and interrupted more. If you’re afraid to speak up, feel the fear — and speak up anyway. You were hired for a reason, and the world needs your ideas.

Mark Cuban: Keep calm and carry on

Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban smiles during the game between the New York Knicks and the Dallas Mavericks at Madison Square Garden on January 30, 2019 in New York City. Elsa | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images

The advice from billionaire Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks and star of business reality TV show “Shark Tank ” — airing weeknights at 7:00 p.m. on CNBC — is not to get flustered. “Don’t stress about your first job,” Cuban said. The first few jobs you have are a time to finally get paid to learn, rather than vice versa, he said. According to Cuban, you want to be able to get three things from an early-career job: money (naturally); an enjoyable, fun company culture; and a little self-knowledge.

Suzy Welch: Make your boss love you

Suzy Welch Adam Jeffery | CNBC

Mika Brzezinski: Develop your voice


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mika, mark, sethi, sandberg, ramit, suzy, job, getty, women, mavericks, welch, advice, plus, speak, work, cuban, sheryl


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Women CEOs outearn male top execs, according to a new study by Equilar

Women chief executive officers at America’s biggest companies took home median pay of more than $13 million in 2018, compared with the $12 million that men took home. That’s according to a new Equilar study, which looked at base salary, bonus, stock-based compensation and other benefits. The study found that women chief executives have made more than their male counterparts each of the last five years. During that time-frame, overall compensation has grown 25%. These are the 10 highest-paid CEOs


Women chief executive officers at America’s biggest companies took home median pay of more than $13 million in 2018, compared with the $12 million that men took home. That’s according to a new Equilar study, which looked at base salary, bonus, stock-based compensation and other benefits. The study found that women chief executives have made more than their male counterparts each of the last five years. During that time-frame, overall compensation has grown 25%. These are the 10 highest-paid CEOs
Women CEOs outearn male top execs, according to a new study by Equilar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: leslie picker harriet taylor, leslie picker, harriet taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, execs, took, male, equilar, according, outearn, compensation, men, million, ceos, highestpaid, overall, women, study, oracle


Women CEOs outearn male top execs, according to a new study by Equilar

There is at least one place where women are earning more than men: the C-Suite.

Women chief executive officers at America’s biggest companies took home median pay of more than $13 million in 2018, compared with the $12 million that men took home. That’s according to a new Equilar study, which looked at base salary, bonus, stock-based compensation and other benefits.

The study found that women chief executives have made more than their male counterparts each of the last five years. During that time-frame, overall compensation has grown 25%.

Only one woman managed to crack the overall list of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year. Safra Catz of Oracle made about $108 million, coming in behind Tesla’s Elon Musk, Discovery’s David Zaslav and Catz’s co-CEO at Oracle, Mark Hurd.

These are the 10 highest-paid CEOs in 2018, according to Equilar:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: leslie picker harriet taylor, leslie picker, harriet taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, execs, took, male, equilar, according, outearn, compensation, men, million, ceos, highestpaid, overall, women, study, oracle


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b


“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b
Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, women, leave, plan, rights, pay, far, equal, abortion, family, harris, booker, presidential, proposed, warren, candidates, womens, policies


Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women's rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, center, speaks during a health care bill news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.

As the 2020 presidential campaign continues to heat up — with 23 democratic candidates in the race so far — conversations around women’s rights and policies have taken center stage in many political discussions. From the fight for equal pay and paid parental leave to the push for abortion rights and better maternal healthcare, many presidential hopefuls are aware that they’ll need to address these key issues in order to win over women, who, have historically voted at higher rates than men. “Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. Though many dismiss identity politics, she writes, “for many women/women of color/black women, identity is politics,” and it will be critical for presidential candidates to recognize that. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) talk with each other as they listen to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer | Getty Images

Abortion and reproductive rights

On May 15, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a bill that bans doctors from performing an abortion at any stage during a pregnancy. Alabama is one of more than 10 states — including Georgia, Louisiana and Arkansas — that have passed, or are working to pass, anti-abortion laws. Though these policies have led many presidential hopefuls to speak out against abortion bans on their campaign trail, very few have released actual plans for protecting abortion once in office. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s bill, Sen. Warren shared her plan for protecting abortion rights in a post published on Medium on May 17. Warren called the bill “the most extreme abortion ban in over 40 years” and writes that as president, she would pass new federal laws to uphold the Roe v. Wade ruling and ensure all women have access to birth control and abortion. She writes that she would do this by making reproductive health coverage part of overall health coverage and she would “[repeal] the Hyde Amendment, which blocks abortion coverage for women under federally funded health care programs like Medicaid, the VA, and the Indian Health Service.” Corey Booker On May 22, Sen. Booker released a plan to create a White House Office for Reproductive Freedom. He says that in addition to increasing the budget for Title X family planning — which has dropped from roughly $297.4 million in 2012 to $286.4 million now — he would reverse Trump’s “gag rule,” which bans doctors from telling women how they can safely and legally access an abortion. Booker says that as president he would also guarantee access to employer-covered contraceptive care and restore evidence-based guidelines for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program so that young people are educated about their healthcare options. Kamala Harris On May 28, Sen. Harris released a plan on her campaign website that, she says, for the first time would require “states and localities with a history of violating Roe v. Wade to obtain approval from her Department of Justice before any abortion law or practice can take effect.” Additionally, she says she would protect funding for Planned Parenthood and she would nominate judges who support the Roe v. Wade decision. Gillibrand, Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang all say they would appoint judges who support abortion rights. John Hickenlooper On May 29, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper wrote in a Medium post that as president he would expand the long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plan that he oversaw in Colorado, which makes healthcare and contraception more accessible and affordable for women. As president, he said he would be “committed to ensuring that every woman has access to the full range of contraceptive options, so she can choose the method that best fits her needs and preferences, and that providers are educated and trained to provide the full range of options in a way that respects decision-making and autonomy.” Additional measures In addition to Warren, many other presidential candidates including Harris, Booker, Gillibrand, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke said they would repeal the Hyde Amendment. And like Booker, Sanders, Warren, Gillibrand, O’Rourke and Hickenlooper stated that they would also increase the budget for Title X family planning. Meanwhile, Gillibrand and O’Rourke say they would reverse the Trump Administration’s gag rule. “This is about the fundamental question of whether we value women and see them as human beings equal to anyone else,” Gillibrand wrote in a Medium post, “and any Democrat who expects to win the presidency must answer definitively.”

Entrepreneur and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks during a campaign stop at the train depot on February 1, 2019 in Jefferson, Iowa. Joshua Lott | AFP | Getty Images

Equal pay

Women, on average, earn $.80 cents for every dollar paid to men. When broken down by race, Asian-American women earn $0.85 compared to white men, white women earn $0.77 compared to white men and African-American, Native American and Latina women earn $0.61, $0.58 and $0.53, respectively, compared to white men. When it comes to closing the pay gap, Harris leads the way with a detailed plan for how she would enforce equality in the workplace. Kamala Harris On May 20, Harris released an ambitious plan that outlines how she would hold companies responsible for paying and promoting women fairly. Calling her plan “the most aggressive pay proposal in history,” the California senator said that as president she would give companies with 100 or more employees three years to obtain an Equal Pay Certification from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and companies with 500 or more employees two years to obtain certification. In order to receive this certification, Harris writes that companies would have to prove that they’ve eliminated all pay disparities for men and women who are doing equal work. If a pay gap does exist, then the company would have to prove that it exists based on merit, performance or seniority, and not gender. Any company that fails to meet these requirements would be fined 1% of their profits for every 1% wage gap they allow to persist in their organization. Bernie Sanders Sanders’ campaign website says that he would “adopt equal pay for equal work through the Paycheck Fairness Act,” a proposed law that addresses gaps in the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in order to ensure men and women are paid fairly. Andrew Yang Yang says on his website he would work with states to implement salary disclosure laws and implement pilot studies to test whether policy changes result in more equitable hiring and pay. Pete Buttigieg Buttigieg also says he would sign the Paycheck Fairness Act and he would mandate that companies publicly submit an annual report detailing how much men make in comparison to women at their organization. He says he will also strengthen anti-discrimination laws in order to prevent gender and sexual-identity discrimination, as well as discrimination against pregnant workers. Additional measures Warren and Booker haven’t released specific plans for addressing pay gap issues, but they are co-sponsors of the Paycheck Fairness Act, along with presidential hopefuls Sen. Michael F. Bennet, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Rep. Seth Moulton, Rep. Tim Ryan and Rep. Eric Swalwell. Refinery29 notes that Warren also leads by example when it comes to equal pay — the average women-to-men earnings ratio among staffers in her office is 1: 0.08.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at a campaign stop on May 15, 2019 in Nashua, New Hampshire. Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Maternal mortality

The U.S. is one of 13 countries where the maternal mortality rate has worsened in the last 25 years. Data shows that black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy or child-birth related causes than white women. Elizabeth Warren In an op-ed for Essence, Warren writes that she would incentivize health systems that keep mothers healthy, push for more inclusive best practices that have historically benefited mothers of color, diversify hospital staffs and hold hospitals accountable for preventable failures. Kamala Harris Similarly, Harris told Elle.com that she would reintroduce the Maternal Care Access and Reducing Emergencies (Maternal CARE) Act, which includes a $25 million grant for training programs and medical schools to fight racial bias in maternal health. The bill will also include an allocation of $125 million to identify high-risk pregnancies and to provide mothers with the culturally competent health care and resources they need. Harris first introduced this bill in 2018, but it did not receive a vote prior to the 115th Congress ending in December. Additional measures Though Booker has not released a detailed presidential plan for addressing the maternal mortality rate, in May, he and Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley introduced the Maximizing Outcomes for Moms through Medicaid Improvement and Enhancement of Services (MOMMIES) Act. The act would extend the time in which Medicaid will cover postpartum women from two months after giving birth to one year.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand Zach Gibson | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Paid family leave


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, women, leave, plan, rights, pay, far, equal, abortion, family, harris, booker, presidential, proposed, warren, candidates, womens, policies


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post