Prosecutor: Cristiano Ronaldo won’t face Las Vegas rape charge

JP Morgan: The market is ‘vulnerable’ to a vicious sell-off if… Danger is lurking in the stock market: An abrupt sell-off could be around the corner if the Federal Reserve doesn’t deliver the rate cut the market expects next week, the firm…Marketsread more


JP Morgan: The market is ‘vulnerable’ to a vicious sell-off if… Danger is lurking in the stock market: An abrupt sell-off could be around the corner if the Federal Reserve doesn’t deliver the rate cut the market expects next week, the firm…Marketsread more
Prosecutor: Cristiano Ronaldo won’t face Las Vegas rape charge Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ronaldo, rape, vegas, cristiano, vulnerable, las, reserve, market, selloff, stock, rate, lurking, prosecutor, face, charge, vicious, wont, week, morgan


Prosecutor: Cristiano Ronaldo won't face Las Vegas rape charge

JP Morgan: The market is ‘vulnerable’ to a vicious sell-off if…

Danger is lurking in the stock market: An abrupt sell-off could be around the corner if the Federal Reserve doesn’t deliver the rate cut the market expects next week, the firm…

Markets

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ronaldo, rape, vegas, cristiano, vulnerable, las, reserve, market, selloff, stock, rate, lurking, prosecutor, face, charge, vicious, wont, week, morgan


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British government won’t try to stop Facebook’s new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister

Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister. Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it. This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system. The social networ


Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister. Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it. This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system. The social networ
British government won’t try to stop Facebook’s new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, banking, libra, minister, world, stop, uk, coin, viewed, digital, currency, wont, facebooks, facebook, week, try


British government won't try to stop Facebook's new Libra digital coin, says UK finance minister

Regulators, not lawmakers, should decide whether Facebook needs a banking license to launch the new digital currency Libra, according to Philip Hammond, Britain’s outgoing finance minister.

Hammond also told CNBC on Monday that the British government will “engage” with Libra and won’t try to stop it.

This week in the U.S., Senate and House committees are due to examine Facebook’s proposed Libra currency and how it might impact consumers, investors and the U.S. financial system.

The social network’s digital token is being launched as a solution for the number of people in the world currently operating without access to banking services. It is also viewed as a potential moneymaker for Facebook that would likely compete with the multibillion-dollar remittance market.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, banking, libra, minister, world, stop, uk, coin, viewed, digital, currency, wont, facebooks, facebook, week, try


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Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA

Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA9 Hours AgoGrant Geyer of RSA says, in future conflicts, war won’t start with bullets and bombs. Instead, the first salvo will be to try to take the communications infrastructure of a foreign country off the air, he says.


Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA9 Hours AgoGrant Geyer of RSA says, in future conflicts, war won’t start with bullets and bombs. Instead, the first salvo will be to try to take the communications infrastructure of a foreign country off the air, he says.
Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, hours, cyberspace, instead, start, infrastructure, era, rsa, rsa9, digital, wont, battlefield, salvo, try


Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA

Cyberspace is the next battlefield of the digital era: RSA

9 Hours Ago

Grant Geyer of RSA says, in future conflicts, war won’t start with bullets and bombs. Instead, the first salvo will be to try to take the communications infrastructure of a foreign country off the air, he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, war, hours, cyberspace, instead, start, infrastructure, era, rsa, rsa9, digital, wont, battlefield, salvo, try


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CBS and Viacom set August target date for merger talks, after exploring for more than a year

CBS and Viacom continue to bob along with merger talks and are now circling Aug. 8 as an internal deadline to agree to a deal, according to people familiar with the matter. — than that, CBS and Viacom happen to share Aug. 8 as the day both companies report second-quarter earnings. Last year, CBS and Viacom got close to announcing a merger with an exchange ratio of 0.6135 CBS share for every Viacom Class B share. This time, the CBS and Viacom boards of directors won’t reach an agreement on the e


CBS and Viacom continue to bob along with merger talks and are now circling Aug. 8 as an internal deadline to agree to a deal, according to people familiar with the matter. — than that, CBS and Viacom happen to share Aug. 8 as the day both companies report second-quarter earnings. Last year, CBS and Viacom got close to announcing a merger with an exchange ratio of 0.6135 CBS share for every Viacom Class B share. This time, the CBS and Viacom boards of directors won’t reach an agreement on the e
CBS and Viacom set August target date for merger talks, after exploring for more than a year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, date, ratio, exchange, deal, talks, wont, set, viacom, bakish, merger, exploring, cbs, companies, issues, target


CBS and Viacom set August target date for merger talks, after exploring for more than a year

Robert Bakish, chief executive officer of Viacom International Media Networks, speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, on Tuesday, March 3, 2015. The event, which generates several hundred million euros in revenue for the city of Barcelona each year, also means the world for a week turns its attention back to Europe for the latest in technology, despite a lagging ecosystem.

CBS and Viacom continue to bob along with merger talks and are now circling Aug. 8 as an internal deadline to agree to a deal, according to people familiar with the matter.

While a transaction could be announced sooner — or later! — than that, CBS and Viacom happen to share Aug. 8 as the day both companies report second-quarter earnings. That makes it a natural goal post for a merger that’s been speculated about for more than a year, said the people, who asked not to be named because discussions are private.

Both companies have conceptually agreed that a deal to gain scale makes sense, said the people. Bulking up to compete with Netflix, Disney, Comcast and others is a narrative that’s been pushed by controlling shareholder Shari Redstone, who is prohibited from proposing a merger of the companies herself — a provision from a lawsuit she settled with CBS Corp. last year. Redstone would like a combined CBS-Viacom to get even larger as it prepares to renew expensive NFL broadcast rights in the coming years. She attended Allen & Co.’s Sun Valley conference last week, an annual setting for companies to begin thinking about future acquisitions.

The price of the transaction, which will come in the form of a merger exchange ratio, hasn’t been discussed and won’t be addressed until all strategic and management issues are sorted out, according to people familiar with the matter.

Last year, CBS and Viacom got close to announcing a merger with an exchange ratio of 0.6135 CBS share for every Viacom Class B share. That deal was ultimately scuttled by management issues, but those issues were resolved when Les Moonves stepped down as CBS CEO last year amid sexual misconduct allegations.

This time, the CBS and Viacom boards of directors won’t reach an agreement on the exchange ratio until all other elements of a deal are set, the people said.

Viacom wants the ratio to increase slightly from last year because the media company, run by CEO Bob Bakish, has outperformed CBS in the last year and avoided a blackout with AT&T’s DirecTV earlier this year, which had been an overhang on the stock in 2018. Issues such as leadership and board composition could swing the exchange ratio one way or another, although the ratio likely won’t move drastically, said the people.

Still, some of Viacom’s outperformance may be due to a renewed M&A premium baked into the stock. And Viacom agreed to lower carriage fees to secure the DirecTV deal.

Viacom is up about five percent in the last 12 months. CBS is down 11 percent in the same time period.

Bakish is expected to be the leader of a combined company, as CNBC has previously reported. While CBS’s board has concerns about Viacom’s leadership under Bakish, the combined boards of the companies will likely work with Bakish to name other executives instead of mandating that certain CBS executives come pre-installed as part of a deal, said the people. CBS CEO Joe Ianniello’s role is still unclear, said the people. His contract as CBS CEO’s runs out at the end of December.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, date, ratio, exchange, deal, talks, wont, set, viacom, bakish, merger, exploring, cbs, companies, issues, target


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Earnings season is almost here and companies are warning the results won’t be pretty

Because of uncertainty around trade wars and global growth, a bulk of U.S. companies are lowering the bar for their second-quarter earnings. Of the 114 companies that have issued earnings guidance for the period, 77% have issued negative forecasts, according to data from FactSet. “That says it all about the trajectory now of earnings,” Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer of Bleakley Advisory Group, told CNBC Thursday. Minnesota-based Fastenal was among the first companies to give investors


Because of uncertainty around trade wars and global growth, a bulk of U.S. companies are lowering the bar for their second-quarter earnings. Of the 114 companies that have issued earnings guidance for the period, 77% have issued negative forecasts, according to data from FactSet. “That says it all about the trajectory now of earnings,” Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer of Bleakley Advisory Group, told CNBC Thursday. Minnesota-based Fastenal was among the first companies to give investors
Earnings season is almost here and companies are warning the results won’t be pretty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, warning, week, earnings, pretty, season, companies, results, fastenal, period, wont, issued, trade, boockvar, secondquarter


Earnings season is almost here and companies are warning the results won't be pretty

Because of uncertainty around trade wars and global growth, a bulk of U.S. companies are lowering the bar for their second-quarter earnings. Of the 114 companies that have issued earnings guidance for the period, 77% have issued negative forecasts, according to data from FactSet.

Thanks in part to those warnings, earnings are estimated by analysts to have declined by 2.9% year over year in the second quarter. At the start of the period, analysts expected earnings to be basically flat. If that estimate for a decline holds up, it would mark the first time the S&P 500 has reported two straight quarters of year-over-year decline in earnings in three years, according to FactSet.

“That says it all about the trajectory now of earnings,” Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer of Bleakley Advisory Group, told CNBC Thursday. Boockvar said the two “key tells this week” have been disappointing second-quarter results from MSC Industrial Direct and Fastenal, both of which cited a slowing business environment.

“These companies lie at the heart of the industrial and construction world,” Boockvar said.

Minnesota-based Fastenal was among the first companies to give investors a glimpse into the corporate cost of tariffs. The largest fastener distributor in North America said in its second-quarter earnings report this week that the trade war has damaged its business and outlined the difficulty of countering the losses.

“While we successfully raised prices as one element of our strategy to offset tariffs placed to date on products sourced from China, those increases were not sufficient to also counter general inflation in the marketplace,” Fastenal said in a press release.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariffs, warning, week, earnings, pretty, season, companies, results, fastenal, period, wont, issued, trade, boockvar, secondquarter


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Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First


Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First
Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, orlando, wars, later, star, rise, ride, order, disney, open, edge, wont, galaxys, resistance


Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected.

While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019.

“As soon as work is completed at Walt Disney World, Imagineers will head back to California to complete their mission at Disneyland Resort where Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance will open on Friday, Jan. 17,” the company said Thursday.

CEO Bob Iger teased investors in March that the ride is “the most technologically advanced and immersive attraction” the park has ever seen.

The ride is meant to “blur the lines between fantasy and reality” as it puts guests right in the middle of a battle between the First Order and the Resistance. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First Order Star Destroyer and must escape.

The Orlando Galaxy’s Edge land is due to open to the public on August 29 and, while it won’t have the Rise of Resistance ride just yet, it will have the Millennium Falcon: Smuggler’s Run ride ready for guests. Other experiences like Savi’s Workshop, where fans can make their own lighstabers, the Droid Depot, where parkgoers can craft their own droids, and Oga’s Cantina will also be open.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, orlando, wars, later, star, rise, ride, order, disney, open, edge, wont, galaxys, resistance


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Big Pharma won’t like Trump’s next move after rebate rule is abandoned, investors fear

President Donald Trump Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty ImagesPharmaceutical companies may be in the direct path of President Donald Trump’s next big policy push to lower drug prices after the administration abandoned a proposal that would have eliminated rebates from government drug plans. Earlier Thursday, the White House said the Trump administration had withdrawn its plan to ban rebates that drugmakers pay to pharmacy benefit managers. Drug manufacturers pay the rebates to PBMs f


President Donald Trump Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty ImagesPharmaceutical companies may be in the direct path of President Donald Trump’s next big policy push to lower drug prices after the administration abandoned a proposal that would have eliminated rebates from government drug plans. Earlier Thursday, the White House said the Trump administration had withdrawn its plan to ban rebates that drugmakers pay to pharmacy benefit managers. Drug manufacturers pay the rebates to PBMs f
Big Pharma won’t like Trump’s next move after rebate rule is abandoned, investors fear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, trump, rebate, drug, president, big, pay, rule, administration, fear, health, rebates, wont, investors, prices, proposal, trumps, abandoned, pharma


Big Pharma won't like Trump's next move after rebate rule is abandoned, investors fear

President Donald Trump Jabin Botsford | The Washington Post | Getty Images

Pharmaceutical companies may be in the direct path of President Donald Trump’s next big policy push to lower drug prices after the administration abandoned a proposal that would have eliminated rebates from government drug plans. Earlier Thursday, the White House said the Trump administration had withdrawn its plan to ban rebates that drugmakers pay to pharmacy benefit managers. Drug manufacturers pay the rebates to PBMs for getting their drugs covered by Medicare’s Part D prescription plan. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters Thursday morning that Trump decided to pull the proposal after concerns that it would cause insurance companies to increase premiums for seniors.

“The president is deeply committed to protecting America’s seniors,” Azar said in a news briefing in Washington, D.C. “We’re not going to put seniors at risk of their premiums going up.” Analysts say another way Trump could make a push to lower drug prices is a proposal announced last year that would allow Medicare to create an “international pricing index ” to bring drug prices in line with what other nations pay. Pharmaceutical companies oppose the proposal. Merck CEO Ken Frazier has even said he sees a legal challenge if adopted. Pulling the drug rebate rule “effectively puts other drug price control mechanisms back on the table, which could be worse if implemented and enforced,” said Salim Syed, senior biotech analyst at Mizuho Securities. Ipsita Smolinski, managing director at health-care research and consulting firm Capitol Street, said the pricing index is likely the next policy announcement to come from the administration. “With rebate reform dead, more draconian policies may come with respect to biopharma … and the markets feel that. Uncertainty is never good,” Ipsita said. Health insurers stocks jumped Thursday on the news. Shares of UnitedHealth and Cigna closed up 5% and 9%, respectively. CVS Health, which bought insurer Aetna, ended the session up 4%. Meanwhile, pharma stocks tanked on fears the administration’s focus would shift to drugmakers. Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer closed down more than 2%. Shares of Eli Lily and Merck both ended the day down 4%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, trump, rebate, drug, president, big, pay, rule, administration, fear, health, rebates, wont, investors, prices, proposal, trumps, abandoned, pharma


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Why Trump probably won’t be able to add the citizenship question to the census using executive action

President Donald Trump is expected to take executive action to add a citizenship question onto the 2020 census during a ceremony at the White House on Thursday. The final hurdle for the administration is that the Constitution does not provide the president authority over the census, which could doom executive action. On Thursday, after Trump announced a conference on the citizenship question later in the day, the ACLU vowed to fight any executive action. The Trump administration’s effort to add


President Donald Trump is expected to take executive action to add a citizenship question onto the 2020 census during a ceremony at the White House on Thursday. The final hurdle for the administration is that the Constitution does not provide the president authority over the census, which could doom executive action. On Thursday, after Trump announced a conference on the citizenship question later in the day, the ACLU vowed to fight any executive action. The Trump administration’s effort to add
Why Trump probably won’t be able to add the citizenship question to the census using executive action Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, question, citizenship, law, executive, using, action, add, administration, census, probably, supreme, reason, court, wont


Why Trump probably won't be able to add the citizenship question to the census using executive action

President Donald Trump announces a new immigration proposal, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, May 16, 2019.

President Donald Trump is expected to take executive action to add a citizenship question onto the 2020 census during a ceremony at the White House on Thursday.

It’s not quite clear what kind of action that will be. Trump has said he was considering an executive order, among other possibilities. Attorney General William Barr said this week that a legal path exists to get the question on the census, though he has not elaborated.

Any executive action, coming two weeks after Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the Supreme Court’s liberal wing to effectively block the addition of the question, could have some political pay off, particularly for a president who has made battling with the courts a point of pride. But it is unlikely to result in the question being included on the survey, legal experts say.

“He is between legal rocks, spikes, a volcano, and earthquake faults. It’s worse than a rock and a hard place,” said Jessica Levinson, a law professor at Loyola Law School and director of the school’s Public Service Institute. “This is a tough place to litigate your way out of.”

The trouble comes from all sides.

On one side, the Supreme Court found that the administration “contrived” the stated rationale for asking the citizenship question when it said the question would assist in enforcing the Voting Rights Act.

To get over that, Trump will have to come up with a new reason for asking the question that passes muster. But coming up with a new reason that does not seem contrived could be difficult after more than a year of defending the Voting Rights Act explanation.

“Any kind of after-the-fact rationalization is going to look just like that, like an after-the-fact rationalization,” said John Libby, a partner at the law firm Manatt who was part of a team that successfully argued against the addition of the question in federal court in California. “I just don’t see how they can logically do that.”

Marisa Maleck, a former law clerk to Justice Clarence Thomas and a member of the Appellate, Constitutional, and Administrative Law practice at King & Spalding, said any executive action would circumvent the process that Roberts laid out in his Supreme Court opinion, which sent the case back to the Commerce Department, not the president.

And she added that, in typical cases, the government cannot come up with a new reason this late in the game.

“Usually, in pure administrative law matters, you can’t come up with a post hoc reason. You have to show it was the original reason. But this is entirely unprecedented. Could he come up with a new reason? I mean, he’s president,” she said. “It raises the specter of a constitutional crisis.”

“They repeatedly said that complying with the Voting Rights Act was their one and only purpose,” said Deborah Archer, a law professor at New York University law school. “It is hard to make a 180 on that and it is unclear that a court would accept the new justification on its face.”

But even if the administration succeeds in providing a new rationale, there is trouble on another front.

The administration will also have to explain why the strict printing deadline the Commerce Department set for the census no longer applies. Administration attorneys emphasized that the administration faced a July 1 deadline to finalize the census in their plea to get the Supreme Court to hear the case before it was reviewed by an appeals court, an unusual step.

In his ruling, Roberts noted that the top court agreed to hear the case after the government argued that “the census questionnaire needed to be finalized for printing by the end of June 2019.” According to the contractor printing the forms, R.R. Donnelley & Sons, the process will involve 600 million documents mailed to more than 130 million households.

“It’s a pretty staggering process. That deadline was not a fake deadline,” Maleck said.

To make matters worse for the administration, the Supreme Court is on its summer recess, in which justices typically travel, take vacations and teach law classes. If the administration was turned back by a lower court, the top court could hold an emergency session, but it does not generally do so.

The final hurdle for the administration is that the Constitution does not provide the president authority over the census, which could doom executive action. Instead, the Constitution provides for Congress to conduct the census.

“Congress delegated that authority to the Commerce Department. But in terms of the line of power, this is in Congress’s bucket,” Levinson said. “An executive order would be the executive branch trying to reach into that bucket. To me that breaks down our system of checks and balances, the fundamental bedrock of our system.”

Regardless of the president’s next step, it is already virtually guaranteed that it will face legal challenges. On Thursday, after Trump announced a conference on the citizenship question later in the day, the ACLU vowed to fight any executive action.

“The Supreme Court has spoken. The Trump administration’s effort to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census is unlawful. If President Trump takes executive action, we will take legal action,” Dale Ho, the ACLU attorney who argued the matter before the Supreme Court, said in a statement.

It is possible that the president uses Thursday’s conference to sidestep the census issue entirely. Multiple outlets reported Thursday afternoon, citing unnamed sources, that Trump may drop his bid to put the question on the census and instead seek to obtain citizenship information through other means.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, question, citizenship, law, executive, using, action, add, administration, census, probably, supreme, reason, court, wont


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How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what’s important

Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work bet


Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work bet
How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what’s important Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lists, helps, important, executive, weekly, habit, todo, cut, lewis, throwing, focus, stress, good, whats, list, work, wont, trash


How throwing her weekly to-do list in the trash helps this executive focus on what's important

Kate Lewis has a lot on her to-do list.

Lewis is chief content officer of Hearst Magazines. The company’s portfolio includes 300-plus international editions and more than 25 U.S. print brands, including titles like Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire and Marie Claire. Lewis took on the role in August of 2018, becoming only the second person ever to hold the position overseeing all of Hearst’s editors-in-chief and digital directors.

To make sure nothing falls through the cracks, Lewis has developed a unique habit. “Once a week I write down everything on my to-do list,” Lewis told The Cut in a recent interview. “It’s a full page of items in eight-point font, and it’s a tremendously overwhelming thing. Then I throw it out.

“I figure whatever I can remember from what I’ve written down is what I really have to do, and everything else is kind of b——t,” Lewis says. “It’s so good. For so long I had notebooks and downloaded to-do list apps, and as soon as I wrote everything in there, I was mad. So I was like, okay, I’m going to try a new approach, and this has been very effective for me. If you fall off the list, sorry!”

While executives like billionaire Virgin Group Founder Richard Branson and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran swear by making to-do lists to stay organized, others echo Lewis’ advice, finding different ways to make traditional to-do lists work better for them.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey writes a “do” and “won’t do” list every morning, and he says the latter is often more important. Sharing this habit in a tweet in 2018, his “won’t do” list included drinking alcohol and writing projects (the work tasks on his daily “won’t do” lists eventually get moved up to his “do” list.)

And Lewis’ system may not work for everyone, but she tells The Cut that as someone who’s good at living with stress, it helps her to get her work done.

“I think stress is part of what makes me optimistic, because stress and excitement are related,” Lewis says. “Sometimes stress is just a major downer, but sometimes stress is anticipation — the open door of something new.”

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Don’t miss: Tony Robbins: A to-do list isn’t the best way to achieve your goals—this is


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lists, helps, important, executive, weekly, habit, todo, cut, lewis, throwing, focus, stress, good, whats, list, work, wont, trash


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Trump says he’s ‘not a fan’ of Jeffrey Epstein — won’t explain ‘falling out’ with accused child sex trafficker

Epstein has pleaded not guilty in the case, and is being held pending a detention hearing next week. In 2002, Trump told New York magazine that at that time he had known Epstein for more than a decade and called him a “terrific guy” who is “a lot of fun to be with.” “It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side,” Trump told the magazine at the time. Trump, during a photo opportunity in the Oval Office on Tuesday, told reporters that he h


Epstein has pleaded not guilty in the case, and is being held pending a detention hearing next week. In 2002, Trump told New York magazine that at that time he had known Epstein for more than a decade and called him a “terrific guy” who is “a lot of fun to be with.” “It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side,” Trump told the magazine at the time. Trump, during a photo opportunity in the Oval Office on Tuesday, told reporters that he h
Trump says he’s ‘not a fan’ of Jeffrey Epstein — won’t explain ‘falling out’ with accused child sex trafficker Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, sex, york, falling, told, acosta, fan, federal, epstein, explain, hes, known, trafficker, office, trump, wont, jeffrey


Trump says he's 'not a fan' of Jeffrey Epstein — won't explain 'falling out' with accused child sex trafficker

President Donald Trump on Tuesday said “I was “not a fan” of accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein — but repeatedly refused to reveal what led to a “falling out” that he now claims to have had with the wealthy financier about 15 years ago.

Trump’s comments came a day after Epstein, 66, appeared in New York federal court to face new charges that he sexually abused dozens of underage girls, some as young as 14, in his Manhattan and Florida mansions from 2002 to 2005.

Epstein has pleaded not guilty in the case, and is being held pending a detention hearing next week.

In 2002, Trump told New York magazine that at that time he had known Epstein for more than a decade and called him a “terrific guy” who is “a lot of fun to be with.”

“It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side,” Trump told the magazine at the time. “No doubt about it – Jeffrey enjoys his social life.”

Trump, during a photo opportunity in the Oval Office on Tuesday, told reporters that he had known Epstein “like everyone in Palm Beach,” Florida.

“He was a fixture in Palm Beach,” Trump said of Epstein, who is also known for having been friends with former President Bill Clinton.

“I had a falling out a long time ago with him,” Trump said. “I don’t think I’ve spoken to him in 15 years.”

“I was not a fan of his,” Trump said.

Reporters asked Trump at least four times what caused the falling out, in particular if it stemmed from a criminal probe of Epstein in Florida in the mid-2000. But aides ushered them out of the Oval Office as Trump did not answer.

During the same photo opportunity, Trump said that he felt badly for his Labor secretary, Alex Acosta, who is facing increasing calls by Democrats to resign because of his role in a non-prosecution agreement that Epstein signed in 2008 with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami, which Acosta headed at the time.

Trump said that Acosta has done an excellent job as Labor secretary, and said Acosta would not have been the only person responsible for the deal with Epstein.

At the time of that deal, Epstein was being investigated both by state and federal authorities for conduct that is now the basis for the new prosecution by federal prosecutors in Manhattan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: dan mangan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secretary, sex, york, falling, told, acosta, fan, federal, epstein, explain, hes, known, trafficker, office, trump, wont, jeffrey


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