The US blames Iran for the tanker attacks. Here’s what the Navy could do next

The war of words between the U.S. and Iran took a dangerous turn after two ships were attacked in the Gulf of Oman. They were hit Thursday, the same day Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rhouhani. “It was not an accident that the Japanese tanker was attacked,” said Alireza Nader, who heads the New Iran Foundation, a Washington-based think tank that opposes the Islamic Republic. Iran is saying to the world we are able to


The war of words between the U.S. and Iran took a dangerous turn after two ships were attacked in the Gulf of Oman. They were hit Thursday, the same day Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rhouhani. “It was not an accident that the Japanese tanker was attacked,” said Alireza Nader, who heads the New Iran Foundation, a Washington-based think tank that opposes the Islamic Republic. Iran is saying to the world we are able to
The US blames Iran for the tanker attacks. Here’s what the Navy could do next Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jason gewirtz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, attacks, world, iran, gulf, blames, heres, happened, navy, japanese, attacked, naval, tanker, worlds, words


The US blames Iran for the tanker attacks. Here's what the Navy could do next

The war of words between the U.S. and Iran took a dangerous turn after two ships were attacked in the Gulf of Oman. One of the tankers was operated by a Japanese company.

They were hit Thursday, the same day Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe met with Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rhouhani.

The Trump administration put the blame squarely on Iran.

“It was not an accident that the Japanese tanker was attacked,” said Alireza Nader, who heads the New Iran Foundation, a Washington-based think tank that opposes the Islamic Republic. “This was a very blunt warning. Iran is saying to the world we are able to disrupt the world’s oil markets and we’re going to do it.”

But not everyone is convinced. “You have to fully understand what happened before you start shooting” said Mark Cancian, a defense expert with Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former colonel in the Marines with decades of operational knowledge of naval combat.

“The Department of Defense will be reluctant to retaliate until they are certain what happened and who fired on whom, and why,” he said.

The U.S. has been beefing up naval and air power, capable of striking Iranian forces in the Persian Gulf over the last month after the White House said it had information about possible future attacks against American interests. The Pentagon would not say Thursday whether there were plans to speed the buildup.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-14  Authors: jason gewirtz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, attacks, world, iran, gulf, blames, heres, happened, navy, japanese, attacked, naval, tanker, worlds, words


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Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here’s why

When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games. “As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a m


When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games. “As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a m
Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20s, 500000, offered, check, getting, felt, activision, future, royalty, hawk, heres, tony, told, turned, buyout, words


Tony Hawk turned down a $500,000 royalty check in his 20s — here's why

When professional skateboarder Tony Hawk was approached by video gaming company Activision in the late 1990s, he was offered a $500,000 buy-out to put his name to one of its games.

But he turned it down.

“As Activision started getting closer to release, they felt like they had a hit on their hands just in terms of the feedback they were getting from game magazines, ” Hawk told “The Brave Ones. ” “And so they offered me a flat buy-out of $500,000 for future royalties … I had never heard anyone speak the words ‘Half a million dollars’ to me.”

Hawk’s instinct told him not to take the pay out. “It seemed unreal that anyone would offer that for the future of something that they don’t even know how it’s going to turn out,” he said.

“I think my saving grace of that was I had just bought a new house and it was almost paid for and I felt pretty comfortable with all my other income and other endorsements happening, that I thought, I could take a gamble on this piece.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 20s, 500000, offered, check, getting, felt, activision, future, royalty, hawk, heres, tony, told, turned, buyout, words


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The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an


With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an
The best career and financial advice we got from our dads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Here’s the best advice we ever got from them.

There’s a difference between a ‘want’ and a ‘need’

Every Christmas, my dad takes me shopping for a “go-to gift.” Kathleen Elkins

“I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ I promptly changed my order to an ice water. As I got older, I learned how to separate larger potential purchases into those two categories and developed a frugal lifestyle, much like my dad’s, centered around needs, rather than wants. Of course, there’s always a time and place for a chocolate milk: The occasional splurge keeps you sane. I just make sure to weigh the pros and cons before splurging and ensure that I’m spending on things that truly matter to me. — Kathleen Elkins, senior money reporter

‘If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby’

Courtesy of Megan Leonhardt

“My dad has always been very practical about his approach to life, especially when it comes to finding and building a successful career. He always told me and my sister growing up that we should find careers that we found interesting because we were going to spend the rest of our lives doing it. But when it came to a job within that career, he always stressed that it was important to keep learning. You should constantly be learning new things or you become stagnant. If that happens, it’s time for a new job. “That said, he encouraged both his girls to choose college majors and careers in which we could earn enough to comfortably afford to eat and have a roof over our heads. If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby. He wanted us to be able to stand on our own, and thanks to his little lessons along the way, we’re both doing just that!” — Megan Leonhardt, senior money reporter

Talk less and listen more

“My dad isn’t a man of many words, but he did teach me every lyric to Alison Krauss’ ‘When You Say Nothing At All’ by the time I was three years old. I still keep the lyrics with me since it is a song that means so much to us. “One line says: ‘You say it best when you say nothing at all.’ Those words have always reminded me of the power of listening (rather than talking) and the impact one’s actions (rather than their words) can have on those around them.” — Anna Hecht, money reporter

Passion is important, but so is your paycheck

Courtesy of Lindsey Stanberry

“My dad always says, ‘The reason you get paid to work is because it’s work.’ He’s always been very passionate about his career, and I think I get a lot of my drive from him. But when work gets tough for whatever reason — a project doesn’t go as planned, office politics are complicated, you’re putting in a lot of overtime — I always remind myself, This is why I’m getting a paycheck. ” — Lindsey Stanberry, deputy managing editor Don’t miss: This is the No. 1 money lesson Shaquille O’Neal learned from his drill sergeant dad Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


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Millions are using this Japanese-inspired technique to radically improve their presentations—here’s how it works

But a Japanese-inspired presentation technique has become increasingly popular in the past few years. The format forces you to speak more concisely and clearly by allowing just 20 slides and just 20 seconds to present each slide. You only get 20 slides. If you can’t fill in the blanks for a given topic or slide, don’t include it. Finally, it’s important to practice getting to your point in 20 seconds while speaking with ease and flow.


But a Japanese-inspired presentation technique has become increasingly popular in the past few years. The format forces you to speak more concisely and clearly by allowing just 20 slides and just 20 seconds to present each slide. You only get 20 slides. If you can’t fill in the blanks for a given topic or slide, don’t include it. Finally, it’s important to practice getting to your point in 20 seconds while speaking with ease and flow.
Millions are using this Japanese-inspired technique to radically improve their presentations—here’s how it works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: mark murphy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, works, technique, improve, presentationsheres, audience, youre, millions, seconds, radically, presentation, slides, dont, 20, using, slide, japaneseinspired, words


Millions are using this Japanese-inspired technique to radically improve their presentations—here's how it works

Too many slides, the wrong kinds of slides, rambling and a lack of direction. These are just a few of the most common PowerPoint sins. But a Japanese-inspired presentation technique has become increasingly popular in the past few years. The PechaKucha (which means “chit-chat” in Japanese) technique was created in 2003 by Tokyo-based architects Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham. Since then, it has been used by millions of people all across the world, according to the creators. The message of PechaKucha is simple: The less you say, the more valuable your presentation becomes. And it’s not just for business purposes — speakers, elementary schools and universities also use PechaKucha as an educational tool. The format forces you to speak more concisely and clearly by allowing just 20 slides and just 20 seconds to present each slide. That won’t be easy, but the technique forces a new way of thinking that eliminates the excess and leads to shorter, more creative and highly polished presentations.

What’s your presentation style?

The best presentations have a clear style. Before you start, determine what your presentation style is.

Are you a Data Scientist (you use facts and analytics)? Are you a Storyteller (you create emotional connections)? Are you a Closer (you cut to the chase and deliver the bottom line)? Or, are you a Director (you only stick to the script)? It’s also important to consider your audience and the nature of what you’re presenting. For a deeper understanding of the presentation style that best fits you, take the quiz here.

The 5 rules of PechaKucha

1. You only get 20 slides. That’s it. For each slide, ask yourself, “What will the audience learn from this slide? What questions might they ask? Is this topic relevant to the main objective of the presentation?” If you can’t fill in the blanks for a given topic or slide, don’t include it. 2. You only get 20 seconds of commentary for each slide. You don’t have to speak for all 20 seconds. For some slides, you can simply leave it on display and allow the audience time to digest. If you have trouble cutting down the script, try describing the slide in 30 seconds. Then, turn it into a single sentence, and then down to three words. Finding your objective can be the hardest part of preparing a presentation. By not putting time and effort into this, you’re almost guaranteed to wander off course and lose your audience. 3. Your words should be visual. As you develop the language you’ll use in your presentation, choose words with high imagery value. Forget about corporate gobbledygook, and don’t fall for the misguided notion that the more abstractly you speak, the smarter you’ll sound. When your audience actually understands what you’re talking about, both you and your presentation will appear absolutely brilliant. 4. No complex diagrams and text-heavy bullet points. Overdoing it with the text and complex diagrams will cause your presentation to wander off course, and your audience will lose interest. Keep text to a minimum and give every image or graphic a discernible “holy mackerel” point that’s easy to digest. A good rule of thumb is to use words and visuals that complement, not mirror each other. You want your audience to think, I get exactly what this person is talking about. 5. Practice until you get it right. Finally, it’s important to practice getting to your point in 20 seconds while speaking with ease and flow. Practice in front of a makeshift audience and ask them what they learned. Mark Murphy is a NYT best-selling author and founder of Leadership IQ. He has been ranked as a Top 30 Leadership Guru and his work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune, Forbes and Bloomberg. He has also appeared on CNN, NPR and CBS News Sunday Morning. Follow him on Twitter Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Stop making these 5 common email mistakes at work—here’s how to actually get a reply

Author who studied millionaires for 5 years: Don’t play the lottery if you want to retire rich


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: mark murphy
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, works, technique, improve, presentationsheres, audience, youre, millions, seconds, radically, presentation, slides, dont, 20, using, slide, japaneseinspired, words


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California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech

A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers


A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers
California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, signals, volunteers, speech, brain, restore, way, voice, works, computer, scientists, words, computergenerated, translate, thoughts, system


California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech

A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. They published their paper in the scientific journal “Nature” on Wednesday.

The device works by using a brain-computer interface (BCI), which works out a person’s speech intentions by matching brain signals to physical movements they would usually activate in a person’s vocal tract – their larynx, jaw, lips and tongue. The data is then translated by a computer into spoken words. The same technique has been used to generate limb movement in people with paralysis.

Previous BCI systems for speech facilitation have focused on typing, generally allowing people to type a maximum of 10 words per minute – massively lagging behind the average speaking speed of around 150 words per minute.

Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers recorded activity in a language-producing region of the brain as the volunteers read several hundred sentences aloud.

Researchers working on the project claimed their computer system would not only restore speech, but could eventually reproduce the “musicality” of the human voice that conveys a speaker’s emotions and personality.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, signals, volunteers, speech, brain, restore, way, voice, works, computer, scientists, words, computergenerated, translate, thoughts, system


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California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech

A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers


A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers
California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, signals, volunteers, speech, brain, restore, way, voice, works, computer, scientists, words, computergenerated, translate, thoughts, system


California scientists have found a way to translate thoughts into computer-generated speech

A computer that aims to translate thoughts into natural sounding speech has been hailed by its developers as an “exhilarating” breakthrough.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, designed the system – a computer simulation that turns brain signals into a virtual voice – to help restore speech to people with paralysis or neurological damage. They published their paper in the scientific journal “Nature” on Wednesday.

The device works by using a brain-computer interface (BCI), which works out a person’s speech intentions by matching brain signals to physical movements they would usually activate in a person’s vocal tract – their larynx, jaw, lips and tongue. The data is then translated by a computer into spoken words. The same technique has been used to generate limb movement in people with paralysis.

Previous BCI systems for speech facilitation have focused on typing, generally allowing people to type a maximum of 10 words per minute – massively lagging behind the average speaking speed of around 150 words per minute.

Scientists worked with five volunteers whose brain activity was being monitored as part of a treatment for epilepsy. The researchers recorded activity in a language-producing region of the brain as the volunteers read several hundred sentences aloud.

Researchers working on the project claimed their computer system would not only restore speech, but could eventually reproduce the “musicality” of the human voice that conveys a speaker’s emotions and personality.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, california, signals, volunteers, speech, brain, restore, way, voice, works, computer, scientists, words, computergenerated, translate, thoughts, system


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4 lies HR managers say after the interview—and what they actually mean

The two most stressful parts of job searching: the interview rounds and the waiting period that comes after. There’s a lot of distance between what a hiring manager says and what they really mean. True to best HR practices, managers are trained to ensure that their words and actions don’t indicate any type of personal bias. Here are some of the most common things hiring managers say if they weren’t impressed by your interview:1. If they don’t think you’re a good fit for the role, hiring managers


The two most stressful parts of job searching: the interview rounds and the waiting period that comes after. There’s a lot of distance between what a hiring manager says and what they really mean. True to best HR practices, managers are trained to ensure that their words and actions don’t indicate any type of personal bias. Here are some of the most common things hiring managers say if they weren’t impressed by your interview:1. If they don’t think you’re a good fit for the role, hiring managers
4 lies HR managers say after the interview—and what they actually mean Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: debcarreau, fanette rickert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, responses, worst, short, hiring, lot, hr, lies, interviewand, dont, words, managers, actually, say, youre, mean


4 lies HR managers say after the interview—and what they actually mean

The two most stressful parts of job searching: the interview rounds and the waiting period that comes after.

There’s a lot of distance between what a hiring manager says and what they really mean. True to best HR practices, managers are trained to ensure that their words and actions don’t indicate any type of personal bias.

While it can be nerve-racking to try and decode their vague responses, understanding what they actually mean can help you mentally prepare for the worst and, more importantly, know when it’s time to start looking for other opportunities.

Here are some of the most common things hiring managers say if they weren’t impressed by your interview:

1. “We’ll be in touch.”

If they don’t think you’re a good fit for the role, hiring managers will keep their responses short and unenthusiastic to avoid getting your hopes up. Sometimes (unless you’re consistent about following up), you might not hear back from them at all even after the position as been filled.

Depending on their word choice, however, not all hope may be lost. For example, “I’ll be in touch with you soon,” shows a lot more promise.

2. “I don’t want to take up too much of your time…”

Generally, face-to-face interviews last about 45 minutes or more, so it’s a bad sign if your meeting was scheduled for an hour but got cut short.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: debcarreau, fanette rickert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, responses, worst, short, hiring, lot, hr, lies, interviewand, dont, words, managers, actually, say, youre, mean


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Tony Robbins says these are the 3 biggest reasons investors fail

Tony Robbins, renowned life and business strategist and New York Times bestselling author, has dedicated himself to spreading personal finance literacy across America. As a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council, he’s continuing to share his insights and key strategies to help improve Americans’ financial future. When it comes to investing, the one mantra they tell Robbins over and over is that most investors fail simply for psychological reasons. In other words, Robbins says, our


Tony Robbins, renowned life and business strategist and New York Times bestselling author, has dedicated himself to spreading personal finance literacy across America. As a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council, he’s continuing to share his insights and key strategies to help improve Americans’ financial future. When it comes to investing, the one mantra they tell Robbins over and over is that most investors fail simply for psychological reasons. In other words, Robbins says, our
Tony Robbins says these are the 3 biggest reasons investors fail Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: barbara booth, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, tony, robbins, reasons, biggest, investors, financial, wellness, warren, times, york, fail


Tony Robbins says these are the 3 biggest reasons investors fail

Tony Robbins, renowned life and business strategist and New York Times bestselling author, has dedicated himself to spreading personal finance literacy across America. As a member of CNBC’s Financial Wellness Advisory Council, he’s continuing to share his insights and key strategies to help improve Americans’ financial future.

Throughout his career, Robbins has had the opportunity to interview some of the smartest investors on the planet, including Warren Buffett, Carl Icahn, and Ray Dalio. When it comes to investing, the one mantra they tell Robbins over and over is that most investors fail simply for psychological reasons. In other words, Robbins says, our own brain can be our biggest liability.

According to Robbins, these are the three biggest mistakes that will derail any investor’s success.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: barbara booth, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, words, tony, robbins, reasons, biggest, investors, financial, wellness, warren, times, york, fail


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‘I stash cash where my wife can’t find it’: America’s juiciest money secrets, as told to CNBC

This answer — well, the general sentiment rather than the specifics — was more common than you’d think. In other words, you can’t be of any long-term help to others unless your own finances are in order. Apart from properly handling financial requests from loved ones, also keep an eye out for scam-happy strangers. Every year around this time, phone fraudsters posing as the IRS try to bilk taxpayers out of hard-earned cash. Remember: The IRS will never phone or email you to ask for personal infor


This answer — well, the general sentiment rather than the specifics — was more common than you’d think. In other words, you can’t be of any long-term help to others unless your own finances are in order. Apart from properly handling financial requests from loved ones, also keep an eye out for scam-happy strangers. Every year around this time, phone fraudsters posing as the IRS try to bilk taxpayers out of hard-earned cash. Remember: The IRS will never phone or email you to ask for personal infor
‘I stash cash where my wife can’t find it’: America’s juiciest money secrets, as told to CNBC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, getty images, roy hsu, juanmonino, istock unreleased, jamie grill, john m lund photography inc, digitalvision, richard goerg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, irs, words, trying, stash, cash, secrets, mask, unless, typical, try, americas, told, wife, phone, youd, money, help, cant, juiciest


'I stash cash where my wife can't find it': America's juiciest money secrets, as told to CNBC

This answer — well, the general sentiment rather than the specifics — was more common than you’d think.

More typical, and less dramatic, phrasing ran along the lines of “I give more away than I make to help others” or “My problem is trying to help others and getting stuck.” On the other side of the equation, one survey participant reported that her sister “gave us $5,000 to help with the down payment on our house.”

The “airplane oxygen mask rule” applies down here on terra firma, too: You have to put your own mask on first before helping to put one on someone else. In other words, you can’t be of any long-term help to others unless your own finances are in order.

Apart from properly handling financial requests from loved ones, also keep an eye out for scam-happy strangers. Every year around this time, phone fraudsters posing as the IRS try to bilk taxpayers out of hard-earned cash.

Remember: The IRS will never phone or email you to ask for personal information such as Social Security numbers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, getty images, roy hsu, juanmonino, istock unreleased, jamie grill, john m lund photography inc, digitalvision, richard goerg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, irs, words, trying, stash, cash, secrets, mask, unless, typical, try, americas, told, wife, phone, youd, money, help, cant, juiciest


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The future of Brazilian stocks hinges on two words: Pension reform

The measure will also likely be watered down during the process, setting up the market for disappointment. The bill was submitted to Brazil’s House Justice Commission on Feb. 20. Morgan Stanley economists expect a House vote in August, while Goldman Sachs does not see pension reform turning into law before October. Bolsonaro won Brazil’s presidency last year in part by saying he would pass measures to reduce violence and curb widespread corruption. Nonetheless, many investors believe some sort o


The measure will also likely be watered down during the process, setting up the market for disappointment. The bill was submitted to Brazil’s House Justice Commission on Feb. 20. Morgan Stanley economists expect a House vote in August, while Goldman Sachs does not see pension reform turning into law before October. Bolsonaro won Brazil’s presidency last year in part by saying he would pass measures to reduce violence and curb widespread corruption. Nonetheless, many investors believe some sort o
The future of Brazilian stocks hinges on two words: Pension reform Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: fred imbert, cris faga, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brazils, brazilian, bolsonaro, process, measure, month, stocks, house, words, proposal, market, future, hinges, pension, reform


The future of Brazilian stocks hinges on two words: Pension reform

Bolsonaro’s pension-overhaul proposal, which was submitted last month, aims to save the government more than 1 trillion reals — or about $270 billion — over a 10-year period. This proposal is far more ambitious than former President Michel Temer’s, which targeted 600 billion reals in savings. The measure would also implement a fixed retirement age for men and women at 65 and 62 , respectively.

However, Bolsonaro’s proposal faces a long legislative process. The measure will also likely be watered down during the process, setting up the market for disappointment.

“Timing is the key here, given the complex political process,” Morgan Stanley economists and strategists led by Arthur Carvalho wrote in a note earlier this month. “Although we believe reform will ultimately be approved, we think it will be delayed and a diluted version of what the market is currently pricing in.”

The bill was submitted to Brazil’s House Justice Commission on Feb. 20. If approved by the full House, it moves to the Senate. Any changes there would send it back to the House.

Morgan Stanley economists expect a House vote in August, while Goldman Sachs does not see pension reform turning into law before October.

“In general, if [Bolsonaro] moves forward with reforms meant to ensure public-sector sustainability and a reduction of the state’s role in the economy, there will be opportunities in key sectors,” said Jeffrey Lamoureux, senior country risk analyst for the Americas at Fitch Solutions. “However, we nonetheless believe the Bolsonaro administration will underdeliver on market expectations for pension reforms, which are an essential part of his economic agenda.”

The measure is also facing another problem: Bolsonaro himself. The right-wing president’s popularity has plummeted, with only 34 percent saying his government was doing a “great/good” job, according to pollster Ibope. That’s down from 49 percent in mid-January.

Bolsonaro won Brazil’s presidency last year in part by saying he would pass measures to reduce violence and curb widespread corruption. But since being elected, Bolsonaro has struggled to build the necessary coalition needed to move forward with those plans. Bolsonaro lost the support of Brazil’s top lawmaker, Rodrigo Maya, amid insinuations he was stalling on anti-corruption measures.

Brazilian stocks are down sharply this month. The Bovespa index has fallen 3.9 percent in March while the EWZ ETF has dropped 8.7 percent.

Nonetheless, many investors believe some sort of pension reform will get done and that will boost Brazilian stocks.

“Most people think some kind of reform is going to be approved because, over the past few years, the awareness of the population regarding the need to approve some kind of reform has broadened,” said Diney Vargas, managing partner at Sao Paulo-based hedge fund Apex Capital. “Companies will be hiring, people will have more jobs and people’s purchasing power will improve.”

But the process could go wrong, Vargas said. The plan could fail or, if the proposed savings are too low to change Brazil’s economic fortunes, “then we’ll have a problem.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: fred imbert, cris faga, nurphoto, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brazils, brazilian, bolsonaro, process, measure, month, stocks, house, words, proposal, market, future, hinges, pension, reform


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