China’s recent air pollution levels may be telling a story about the coronavirus impact on its economy

Zhang Peng | ContributorAll eyes are on China’s progress in getting its factories to crank up again, after the country extended this year’s Lunar New Year holiday and shut down major growth regions in a bid to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Many of its provinces started gradually limping back to some form of production last week, about two weeks later than previous years. But here’s how some economists and analysts are tracking the story of China’s progress in returning to work — as the world


Zhang Peng | ContributorAll eyes are on China’s progress in getting its factories to crank up again, after the country extended this year’s Lunar New Year holiday and shut down major growth regions in a bid to contain the coronavirus outbreak.
Many of its provinces started gradually limping back to some form of production last week, about two weeks later than previous years.
But here’s how some economists and analysts are tracking the story of China’s progress in returning to work — as the world
China’s recent air pollution levels may be telling a story about the coronavirus impact on its economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, note, major, traffic, recent, economy, coronavirus, week, industrial, work, telling, levels, air, progress, impact, pollution, chinas


China's recent air pollution levels may be telling a story about the coronavirus impact on its economy

Office buildings amid the heavy haze at Beijing’s business district, in a photo from 2017. Zhang Peng | Contributor

All eyes are on China’s progress in getting its factories to crank up again, after the country extended this year’s Lunar New Year holiday and shut down major growth regions in a bid to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Many of its provinces started gradually limping back to some form of production last week, about two weeks later than previous years. The Chinese government has also been giving regular updates, reporting last Wednesday that work resumption rate has topped 50% for some industrial companies in key economic regions such as Guangdong and Shanghai. Chinese state media also reported Tuesday that more than 80% of its central state-owned companies’ roughly 20,000 manufacturing subsidiaries have resumed work. But here’s how some economists and analysts are tracking the story of China’s progress in returning to work — as the world’s second largest economy gears up to return to full production.

Air pollution levels, coal consumption

Analysts are using pollution levels as a gauge of industrial activity. Major cities in China are well known for being choked by smog, due to the extensive burning of coal by factories. So far this year, pollution levels have been between 20% and 25% lower compared to the same period last year, Tapas Strickland of National Australia Bank (NAB) said in a note earlier last week, suggesting there was a substantial decline in industrial activity in the first quarter. Referring to the official update that more than 80% of China’s 20,000 manufacturing subsidies have resumed work, Rodrigo Catril, senior foreign exchange strategist at NAB, cast doubt on the actual progress. “This news should have been embraced warmly by the market, however high frequency data such as pollution levels and traffic congestion gauges in Beijing do not at this stage corroborate the upbeat official message, keeping investors wary,” he said in a note Wednesday. On Feb. 20 (Thursday), daily coal consumption of six major power plants was 42.5% less than the same time last year, according to Nomura, which has been tracking such metrics daily. The Japanese bank has also been following data on traffic congestion, passenger flows and new home sales in a bid to track the progress of China’s work resumption.

“The pace was slow due to a lack of workers and strict reopening criteria, and it varied across cities, industries, and firms,” J.P. Morgan’s Sin Beng Ong wrote in a note last week. “The weak resumption of production is reinforced by a set of high-frequency indicators in the areas of energy consumption, real estate transactions, passenger traffic, and air quality,” he said.

Passenger migration across China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, note, major, traffic, recent, economy, coronavirus, week, industrial, work, telling, levels, air, progress, impact, pollution, chinas


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China’s Xi rallies people back to work as country continues to battle virus outbreak

Chinese President Xi Jinping, inspects the novel coronavirus prevention and control work in Beijing on Feb. 10, 2020. The Chinese leadership is rallying its people to get back to work even as the country continues to battle with the coronavirus outbreak, amid city-wide lockdowns and quarantines in the worst-hit regions. “This is both a crisis and a big test for us,” President Xi Jinping said at a Sunday meeting in Beijing, state news agency Xinhua reported. He said efforts were being made to cur


Chinese President Xi Jinping, inspects the novel coronavirus prevention and control work in Beijing on Feb. 10, 2020.
The Chinese leadership is rallying its people to get back to work even as the country continues to battle with the coronavirus outbreak, amid city-wide lockdowns and quarantines in the worst-hit regions.
“This is both a crisis and a big test for us,” President Xi Jinping said at a Sunday meeting in Beijing, state news agency Xinhua reported.
He said efforts were being made to cur
China’s Xi rallies people back to work as country continues to battle virus outbreak Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virus, president, rallies, continues, battle, social, work, outbreak, stability, country, worlds, second, largest, chinas, supply


China's Xi rallies people back to work as country continues to battle virus outbreak

Chinese President Xi Jinping, inspects the novel coronavirus prevention and control work in Beijing on Feb. 10, 2020.

The Chinese leadership is rallying its people to get back to work even as the country continues to battle with the coronavirus outbreak, amid city-wide lockdowns and quarantines in the worst-hit regions.

“This is both a crisis and a big test for us,” President Xi Jinping said at a Sunday meeting in Beijing, state news agency Xinhua reported.

He said efforts were being made to cure people, reduce fatality rates, safeguard social stability, and strengthen China’s emergency medical supplies and daily necessities, according to Xinhua’s translations of his remarks.

Since end-January, the world’s second largest economy has shut down factories, businesses and schools in efforts to limit the spread of the disease, which has killed nearly 2,600 and infected more than 77,000 in the mainland so far.

The prolonged Lunar New Year holiday has had knock-on effects on the global supply chain and dented overall market sentiment. It has also spurred global companies to further diversify their supply chains away from China.

The epidemic’s impact on China’s economic and social development is temporary and generally manageable, but it will deal a relatively big blow in the short term, Xi said, according to Xinhua.

Even as the world’s second largest economy pulls out all stops to contain the outbreak, it is keen to revive its vast industry and economic machinery that has been running at breakneck pace for the last four decades, and contributed to social stability in the Communist nation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virus, president, rallies, continues, battle, social, work, outbreak, stability, country, worlds, second, largest, chinas, supply


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Katherine Johnson, NASA mathematician depicted in ‘Hidden Figures,’ dead at 101

NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson (C) and director Ezra Edelman (R) and producer Caroline Waterlow (L), winners of Best Documentary Feature for ‘O.J. Katherine Johnson, one of the NASA mathematicians depicted in “Hidden Figures,” died Monday, the administrator of NASA said. In her role there, she did trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s 1961 mission Freedom 7, which was America’s first human spaceflight, according to NASA. She was best-known though for work that greatly contributed to the f


NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson (C) and director Ezra Edelman (R) and producer Caroline Waterlow (L), winners of Best Documentary Feature for ‘O.J.
Katherine Johnson, one of the NASA mathematicians depicted in “Hidden Figures,” died Monday, the administrator of NASA said.
In her role there, she did trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s 1961 mission Freedom 7, which was America’s first human spaceflight, according to NASA.
She was best-known though for work that greatly contributed to the f
Katherine Johnson, NASA mathematician depicted in ‘Hidden Figures,’ dead at 101 Cached Page below :
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Katherine Johnson, NASA mathematician depicted in 'Hidden Figures,' dead at 101

NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson (C) and director Ezra Edelman (R) and producer Caroline Waterlow (L), winners of Best Documentary Feature for ‘O.J.: Made in America’ pose in the press room during the 89th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 26, 2017 in Hollywood, California.

Katherine Johnson, one of the NASA mathematicians depicted in “Hidden Figures,” died Monday, the administrator of NASA said. She was 101.

Johnson “was an American hero and her pioneering legacy will never be forgotten,” NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine wrote on Twitter.

Johnson was portrayed by Taraji P. Henson in the Oscar nominated 2016 film “Hidden Figures” about trailblazing black women whose work at NASA was integral during the Space Race.

The film also stars Octavia Spencer as mathematician Dorothy Vaughan and Janelle Monáe as engineer Mary Jackson.

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Johnson began working at NASA’s predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’ in 1953 at the Langley laboratory in Virginia. In her role there, she did trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s 1961 mission Freedom 7, which was America’s first human spaceflight, according to NASA.

She was also the first woman in the Flight Research Division to receive credit as an author of a research report for her work with Ted Skopinski on detailing the equations describing an orbital spaceflight.

She was best-known though for work that greatly contributed to the first American orbital spaceflight, piloted by John Glenn.

The 1962 flight required the construction of a “worldwide communications network” linking tracking stations around the world to computers in Washington, D.C., Cape Canaveral, and Bermuda.

But astronauts weren’t keen on “putting their lives in the care of the electronic calculating machines, which were prone to hiccups and blackouts,” according to NASA. So Glenn asked engineers to “get the girl,” referring to Johnson, to run the computer equations by hand. “If she says they’re good,'” Johnson remembered Glenn saying, “then I’m ready to go.”

“Glenn’s flight was a success, and marked a turning point in the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union in space,” NASA says.

But “when asked to name her greatest contribution to space exploration, Katherine Johnson talks about the calculations that helped synch Project Apollo’s Lunar Lander with the moon-orbiting Command and Service Module,” according to NASA.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-24
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, katherine, figures, dead, spaceflight, depicted, johnson, mathematician, space, according, research, flight, orbital, work, hidden, nasa, 101


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Here’s how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance

When it comes to work-life balance, time is money. These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it. What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve itYounger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance. Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea o


When it comes to work-life balance, time is money.
These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it.
What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve itYounger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance.
Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea o
Here’s how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, say, workers, balance, work, heres, money, better, survey, colliton, personal, worklife


Here's how much money workers would give up for better work-life balance

When it comes to work-life balance, time is money. In fact, for the average worker who says they currently have work-life balance, it would take an extra $10,000 in pay per year for them to give up their personal time, according to a survey of 1,061 U.S. workers by career site Joblist. But for the 35% of workers who say they haven’t been able to establish clear personal and professional boundaries, their desire for better flexibility doesn’t seem to hold as much weight. These workers who reported not having work-life balance said they’d give up between $1,710 to $2,820 in order to achieve it. Corie Colliton, Joblist’s lead researcher, tells CNBC Make It that workers without balance might not know how much they’re missing out on. “Among the workers who currently enjoy a balanced lifestyle, they’d be hard-pressed to give it up,” Colliton says. “This indicates how important flexibility is to professionals who have had the chance to see how it impacts their day-to-day.” Overall, the majority of Americans are optimistic and say that achieving work-life balance is a realistic goal, though broken down by generation, the sentiment is highest among Baby Boomers and lowest among millennials.

What’s contributing to the work-life imbalance — and how to improve it

Younger workers, part of what some call the “burnout generation,” are also more likely to say they haven’t achieved work-life balance. Indeed, research suggests money and work are the biggest factors contributing to millennials’ stress, making the idea of work-life balance all the more elusive. According to a survey from Mind Share Partners, a nonprofit that works with companies to improve mental health resources, half of millennial workers have left a job, either voluntarily or involuntarily, partially due to mental health reasons. The Joblist survey found people who’ve achieved balance are more likely to make plans after work, track time on work tasks, set aside time for personal reflection and take time off. It can also be reasoned that these workers were able to achieve balance in the first place only after becoming better at managing and establishing boundaries around their time. “Adopting new habits is never easy, but professionals who are interested in creating more balance in their lives can start small by writing down or thinking about their idea of what balance looks like,” Colliton says. “Once priorities are established, try setting goals like leaving the office at 5 p.m. once per week or turning your phone off during dinner. Tracking how you spend time at the office can also be beneficial.”

The workers willing to give up the most for better balance


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theyd, say, workers, balance, work, heres, money, better, survey, colliton, personal, worklife


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Ping An says the coronavirus will impact China’s economy but has also been ‘helpful’ for its business

Ping An Insurance, also known as Ping An of China, logo seen on a skyscraper in Shanghai. (Photo by Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)A top executive at Chinese conglomerate Ping An Insurance says the coronavirus outbreak in China has in some ways been “helpful” for the business. Speaking to CNBC on Friday, Tan said: “What we see about the impact in virus, particularly in the first half, will definitely impact the economy. In a separate interview with Reuters, Tan appeared less u


Ping An Insurance, also known as Ping An of China, logo seen on a skyscraper in Shanghai.
(Photo by Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)A top executive at Chinese conglomerate Ping An Insurance says the coronavirus outbreak in China has in some ways been “helpful” for the business.
Speaking to CNBC on Friday, Tan said: “What we see about the impact in virus, particularly in the first half, will definitely impact the economy.
In a separate interview with Reuters, Tan appeared less u
Ping An says the coronavirus will impact China’s economy but has also been ‘helpful’ for its business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visit, ping, impact, economy, virus, insurance, business, particularly, helpful, coronavirus, work, chinas, chinese, china, tan


Ping An says the coronavirus will impact China's economy but has also been 'helpful' for its business

Ping An Insurance, also known as Ping An of China, logo seen on a skyscraper in Shanghai. A Chinese holding conglomerate. (Photo by Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

A top executive at Chinese conglomerate Ping An Insurance says the coronavirus outbreak in China has in some ways been “helpful” for the business.

“This virus actually, it’s been particularly helpful because we’ve suddenly had requests you know, (from) over 30 over banks and … 20 over insurers whereby we provide our technology to help of them to get up back to work very quickly,” Jessica Tan, co-CEO of Ping An, a Chinese insurance firm listed in Hong Kong.

Speaking to CNBC on Friday, Tan said: “What we see about the impact in virus, particularly in the first half, will definitely impact the economy. Of course, the financial services industry is less hit by the virus.”

The global outbreak of COVID-19, most keenly felt in China and its Hubei province where most of the deaths and cases have occurred, has so far claimed more than 2,000 lives. It has impacted economies, especially those in Asia, as well as the outlook for large companies such as Apple.

Investors are still struggling to grapple with the potential impact of the mysterious disease as China locked down cities and extended the Lunar New Year holiday for factories and schools, in order to limit the spread of the pneumonia-like virus.

In a separate interview with Reuters, Tan appeared less upbeat and acknowledged that the current coronavirus situation is “very challenging” as the bulk of Ping An’s business is driven “primarily by agents.”

“There are guidelines that they can’t visit customers,” Tan told Reuters. “We, as well as the rest of the industry, are trying to accelerate the transition to work in a new model whereby the agents are unable the visit the customers and yet you able to maintain your business.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visit, ping, impact, economy, virus, insurance, business, particularly, helpful, coronavirus, work, chinas, chinese, china, tan


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The biggest misconception about diversity and inclusion at work, according to a leader at the No. 1-ranked employer for diversity

Judith Williams is leading the way in a new era of diversity and inclusion. For Williams, the recognition comes at a critical time when the tide is turning in the world of D&I. “We used to have to say to leaders, ‘Hey, can we show you diversity data? Meanwhile, a majority of today’s young workers say they place great importance on gender and ethnic diversity when considering a potential employer, according to Deloitte’s 2019 Millennial Survey. Williams is especially proud of the work she’s done


Judith Williams is leading the way in a new era of diversity and inclusion.
For Williams, the recognition comes at a critical time when the tide is turning in the world of D&I.
“We used to have to say to leaders, ‘Hey, can we show you diversity data?
Meanwhile, a majority of today’s young workers say they place great importance on gender and ethnic diversity when considering a potential employer, according to Deloitte’s 2019 Millennial Survey.
Williams is especially proud of the work she’s done
The biggest misconception about diversity and inclusion at work, according to a leader at the No. 1-ranked employer for diversity Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saps, workers, company, conversation, leader, employer, according, 1ranked, inclusion, sap, data, biggest, misconception, work, williams, program, diversity


The biggest misconception about diversity and inclusion at work, according to a leader at the No. 1-ranked employer for diversity

Judith Williams is leading the way in a new era of diversity and inclusion. After years of trailblazing efforts for diversity and inclusion, often shortened to D&I, at tech giants including Google and Dropbox, Williams joined enterprise software company SAP as head of people sustainability and chief D&I officer in 2018. SAP, which has been acknowledged for its efforts to recruit and promote a diverse workforce, was recently named by Forbes as the best employer for diversity in 2020. For Williams, the recognition comes at a critical time when the tide is turning in the world of D&I. First, there was a need for access to data in order to show a lack of diverse representation in the work force, particularly in the tech industry. “When I think about starting at Google, a lot of what we were doing was getting the attention of leaders,” Williams tells CNBC Make It about her time as Google’s global D&I program manager from 2011 to 2015. “We used to have to say to leaders, ‘Hey, can we show you diversity data? Can we have a conversation about what’s going on in the organization and outside Google?’ “Now, we find the conversation has gone beyond that,” Williams says. “If you’re not considering some questions about diversity and inclusion in your organization, some folks on your team will ask about it, the marketers will ask about it, the analysts will ask about it. It’s become a different kind of conversation.”

The turning point in diversity and inclusion

Today, the conversation is less about proving that lack of representation at work is a concern — more often, the public is holding companies accountable for remedying it. For example, a 2018 study by the National Urban League found that fewer than 3% of tech workers identify as black at companies such as Uber, Twitter, Google and Facebook. Meanwhile, a majority of today’s young workers say they place great importance on gender and ethnic diversity when considering a potential employer, according to Deloitte’s 2019 Millennial Survey. Williams’s work involves shifting that conversation from awareness to action. Action doesn’t necessarily mean more programming, however. “We often get fixated on: Are you launching an unconscious bias training? Are you launching a mentorship program? Are there employee network groups having events celebrating Black History Month?” Williams says. “And all that stuff brings the attention of workers. But once you have that attention, it’s the hard work of having to change culture.” Changing the culture at a company with 100,330 global employees, just a quarter of whom are based in North America, is no easy feat. For Williams’s part, she tackles the issue like any business problem. And like in other parts of her job, it starts and ends with data. The numbers inform her strategy, set expectations, establish accountability and, ultimately, measure results. “At the end of the day, I know having a more diverse and inclusive workforce is going to lead to some financial outcomes. So you want to be consistently driving toward those outcomes. Focus on outcomes, not activity,” Williams says.

What an outcomes-based strategy looks like

Williams admits that when joined SAP, the culture was still very much focused on programming. It’s been her job for the last year and a half to shift that conversation to an outcomes-based strategy. That goes for every stage of the talent pipeline, from recruiting to rewarding and promoting. For example, SAP’s Project Propel is a partnership where the company teaches its software to undergraduate and MBA students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, who can use these learned skills to leverage career opportunities with the company or one of its partners after graduation. Women hold roughly 26% of management positions at SAP, and the company aims to reach 30% by 2022. To get there, the company is using data to determine where workers, especially women, might be experiencing progression gaps and career stalls. More transparent discussions between workers and leaders can help under-recognized top performers advance more quickly. Ultimately, SAP hopes to achieve the same promotion ratio for men and women. Williams is especially proud of the work she’s done with SAP’s Autism at Work program, which launched in 2013 and aims to recruit and train workers on the autism spectrum. About half of professionals who take part in SAP’s six-week pre-employment training program end up with with a paid position at the company. In 2019, the program made the most number of hires from the program in a single year, bringing SAP’s global workforce of employees with autism to more than 175 workers. “How we think about our Autism at Work program is that there isn’t any specific job that people who come into the program are expected to take on,” Williams says, “but we remove the barrier so they can show their true capabilities to shine in any job.”

Harnessing data to change the world


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saps, workers, company, conversation, leader, employer, according, 1ranked, inclusion, sap, data, biggest, misconception, work, williams, program, diversity


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China starts to get back to work as leaders worry about people’s jobs

Kevin Frayer | Getty ImagesBEIJING — While Chinese authorities try to control the spread of the new virus, they are moving quickly to stall its impact on the economy, especially on people’s jobs. These policy moves also come as the country begins a gradual return to work in manufacturing, technology and other major industries. In a report this week, analysts at S&P Global China painted a grim picture for restaurant, tourism and media and entertainment businesses. Case in point: Hubei province, w


Kevin Frayer | Getty ImagesBEIJING — While Chinese authorities try to control the spread of the new virus, they are moving quickly to stall its impact on the economy, especially on people’s jobs.
These policy moves also come as the country begins a gradual return to work in manufacturing, technology and other major industries.
In a report this week, analysts at S&P Global China painted a grim picture for restaurant, tourism and media and entertainment businesses.
Case in point: Hubei province, w
China starts to get back to work as leaders worry about people’s jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, yuan, businesses, virus, china, half, leaders, impact, workers, starts, peoples, industries, work, worry, economy


China starts to get back to work as leaders worry about people's jobs

A Chinese woman slides steam buns down a ramp used to prevent touching and contact as the customer takes his order at a local take out on February 19, 2020 in Beijing, China. Kevin Frayer | Getty Images

BEIJING — While Chinese authorities try to control the spread of the new virus, they are moving quickly to stall its impact on the economy, especially on people’s jobs. This past Tuesday, the powerful State Council decided at a meeting to waive some business’ contributions to social insurance plans through June, and emphasized that “stable employment” must be a priority. These policy moves also come as the country begins a gradual return to work in manufacturing, technology and other major industries. The coronavirus that has killed more than 2,000 people began spreading rapidly in mainland China in January ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday and forced more than half of the country to shut down for at least a week longer than planned.

As of Thursday morning, about a third of 1,000 Chinese companies surveyed in the last week by research firm China Beige Book remain closed, and roughly another third are operating remotely. Workforces are losing more laborers than hiring, and wages are on the verge of contracting, the research firm’s survey found, noting the trends were consistent regardless of industry or company size. China’s Commerce Ministry said Friday that resumption of work in the country’s top exporting province of Guangdong has been “rapidly increasing,” while key businesses in foreign trade in provinces such as Zhejiang and Shandong have a resumption of work rate of around 70%. But the ministry said Thursday it expected consumption will still be in a recovery period in the second quarter, indicating the scale of the virus’ impact on the economy even if the disease is curbed by March.

More challenges for private companies

The high-level policy announcements come amid a flurry of local government policies to support privately run, smaller businesses, which account for the majority of jobs in China but operate in a state-dominated environment. One plan to reduce employers’ contributions to workers’ social security is expected to ease businesses’ burden by a total 500 billion yuan ($71 billion), officials said Thursday. That’s about one-fifth of the more than 2 trillion yuan in last year’s tax and fee cuts. “The original intent of the country is very good, and we hope all levels of government will fully implement these relief measures, and not take discounts, in order to really alleviate some of the impact of this (virus) on medium, small and micro-sized enterprises,” a financial markets veteran in Beijing said, according to a CNBC translation. The individual asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue. “This (virus) has made it more difficult for private enterprises to survive (in an environment of widespread market and financing discrimination),” the source said, describing the situation faced by smaller firms as “hitting a tough point of life or death.” “If private companies fail in a large number of outbreaks, the domino effect on the job market is extremely obvious.”

Wages getting hit

Analysts have pointed out that the challenges to employment are greater now than during the SARS outbreak in 2003. Then, close to half of workers were in primary industries such as agriculture, while in 2018, 46% were in services, according to official data. This time, the virus’ high level of contagion has prompted local governments to limit gatherings, resulting in empty or closed shopping malls and other service-heavy sectors. For their part, retailers are turning to online sales and delivery as a way to make up for the lack of crowded storefronts. In a report this week, analysts at S&P Global China painted a grim picture for restaurant, tourism and media and entertainment businesses. They forecast restaurant sales in the first quarter will likely be half what they were during the same period last year. Even if businesses aren’t laying off workers, many people may not be getting paid as much or at all right now. Inbound tour agency HiChina Travel has postponed salary distributions for its staff of 16 until the situation improves, founder Li Pingzhang said. Li said the Beijing-based start-up refunded all bookings from January to March, and at least half for the following two months — a loss of hundreds of thousands of yuan a month.

For Beijing-based fast-casual food chain Chef Tian Express, it’s not letting go of any staff at its roughly 400 locations, but workers are just getting a base salary for now, according to CEO Yi Yangchun. To cut costs, he said the company is rotating staff, and is hopeful that orders will pick up — operating sales were 10% of normal levels before early February, and are now 30% and increasing. To help employment, national-level officials at press conferences in Beijing in the last two weeks have announced a number of measures including increasing online recruitment, training subsidies and support for innovation-related industries. Government figures, which are frequently doubted, have reported an unemployment rate of near 5% or less for years.

Uncertainty weighs in the short term

The longer-term effect of the virus on the national economy is less certain. While Chinese news headlines are scattered with references to business losses in the hundreds of thousands of yuan or more, financial analysts generally say the fundamentals of the world’s second-largest economy remains intact. For example, an increase in bank loans to struggling smaller businesses at this time will likely increase the level of non-performing loans in the financial system. But if the virus comes under control around March and it’s business as usual in April, then the problem isn’t that great, especially since the direct impact is on services, not asset-heavy industries, pointed out Chen Xinyi, banking analyst at China Asset Management Company. She added that if the virus is under control by March, then the financing needs of manufacturing companies aren’t that great. Commercial real estate services company JLL also expects demand for office space in China to be healthy over the next several years, Daniel Yao, head of research, JLL China, said in a phone interview on Thursday. For now, he said, there’s a clear decline in market vitality, with a drop in property visits, contract signings and construction, and the uncertain environment is causing companies to be more conservative. Case in point: Hubei province, which is at the outbreak’s center, had told businesses that Friday could be the earliest they could resume work. One night before, the government told businesses not to resume work before March 11.

Overview of China’s return to work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobs, yuan, businesses, virus, china, half, leaders, impact, workers, starts, peoples, industries, work, worry, economy


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From the first black cheerleader at Berkeley to making history as Mavericks CEO: How Cynt Marshall did it

Cynthia “Cynt” Marshall was the first black cheerleader at the University of California, Berkeley in the late 1970s. “I just did my job and did what [my bosses] told me to do,” Marshall tells CNBC Make It. CreditL Cynt MarshallIn school, Marshall would over-prepare for everything. It was at Berkeley that Marshall first started breaking barriers — she became the university’s first African-American cheerleader. I’ve never been Cindy [and] I preferred to be called Cynt,” Marshall says.


Cynthia “Cynt” Marshall was the first black cheerleader at the University of California, Berkeley in the late 1970s.
“I just did my job and did what [my bosses] told me to do,” Marshall tells CNBC Make It.
CreditL Cynt MarshallIn school, Marshall would over-prepare for everything.
It was at Berkeley that Marshall first started breaking barriers — she became the university’s first African-American cheerleader.
I’ve never been Cindy [and] I preferred to be called Cynt,” Marshall says.
From the first black cheerleader at Berkeley to making history as Mavericks CEO: How Cynt Marshall did it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cynt, history, cindy, mavericks, mother, marshall, making, berkeley, att, black, school, ceo, cheerleader, california, told, president, work


From the first black cheerleader at Berkeley to making history as Mavericks CEO: How Cynt Marshall did it

Cynthia “Cynt” Marshall was the first black cheerleader at the University of California, Berkeley in the late 1970s. She spent nearly four decades climbing the corporate ladder at AT&T. And today she is the first black, female CEO in the NBA, having taken the helm at the Dallas Mavericks in 2018 to clean up the league’s toxic work culture. But Marshall, 60, says she didn’t truly come into her own until more than 20 years into her career. “I just did my job and did what [my bosses] told me to do,” Marshall tells CNBC Make It. But it was speaking out about her painful childhood and life experiences — from suffering domestic violence to losing a child to surviving cancer — that changed all that, helping Marshall to find herself professionally and setting her on her trailblazing path.

Weeding out ‘distractions’

Marshall grew up in the housing projects in Richmond, California, about four hours from San Francisco. While her family struggled to make ends meet, she also had to deal with an abusive father. In 1975, when Marshall was 15, her father broke her nose as she tried to protect her mother from his physical abuse. After that, her mother and her four siblings left. But Marshall says she learned to “weed out the distractions” at an early age and stayed focused on things that she wanted to accomplish. She also found comfort in books and sports, and credits her mother, Carolyn Gardener, a high school executive administrator and resource librarian, for making education the top priority in their home. “My mother put a math book in one hand and the Bible in the other,” Marshall tells Make It.

Cynt Marshall’s yearbook picture in 1971. CreditL Cynt Marshall

In school, Marshall would over-prepare for everything. That work ethic earned her a full scholarship to the University of California, Berkeley to study business administration and human resources management. It was at Berkeley that Marshall first started breaking barriers — she became the university’s first African-American cheerleader. Praying, she says, helped her cope when people said negative things about her on the football field. “I prayed a lot because I had to keep my spirits calm. It’s the kind of stuff that can get you really upset, when you hear some of that stupid stuff,” Marshall says.

Cynt Marshall was the first African-American cheerleader at the University of California Credit: Cynt Marshall

Fitting in in corporate America

After graduating, at 21, Marshall landed her first job as a local supervisor at AT&T in California in July 1981, working the afternoon and evening shifts. Soon she married her husband Kenneth (who she’d dated in college but broke up with to focus on school), and for 10 years they struggled to have kids. Marshall says she had four second trimester miscarriages, and the couple gave birth to four-months-premature daughter who died six months later. The Marshalls went on to adopt four children from the foster care system. During this time, Marshall climbed her way to upper management at AT&T, regularly promoted to director then to vice president and senior vice president. But she was just following the rules and trying to fit in. Marshall says she experienced what’s known as code-switching, when people of color or differing ethnicities or cultures change the way they present or express themselves to adapt to a given situation. “I tried to look the conservative way my colleagues looked,” says Marshall, who adopted a uniform of a blue suit, a scarf and black shoes. “Nothing ethnic,” she says, which for her meant no red shoes or braids at work. She was also “definitely less animated and quieter at work than at home. In fact, I was once told not to speak so loudly,” Marshall remembers. While Marshall never felt the need to fit in with “the guys” at work, early on in her career she learned to be comfortable being an “outsider.” It also meant Marshall avoided socializing with colleagues outside the office. “Early in my career, I didn’t talk much about my personal life and I made a conscious decision to leave my colloquiums and slang at home,” Marshall says. “However, my church speak came with me. I was once told to say ‘lucky’ instead of ‘blessed.’ I wouldn’t do it.” Since she was a teenager, Marshall also liked to be called “Cynt” (instead of Cindy or Cynthia), a nickname she earned on her high school track team — “Cynt the Sprint.” But when she was promoted to upper management at AT&T in 2000, her bosses told her the nickname had to go. “I refused. I’ve never been Cindy [and] I preferred to be called Cynt,” Marshall says. However, people in the office still called her Cindy at times, and she often had to let it slide.

Being Cynt

It wasn’t until Marshall moved her family from California to become president of AT&T in North Carolina in 2007 that she says she truly found her confidence and authenticity. Marshall was set to give a speech to underserved kids at a local school. She called her mother and asked if it was okay to share their story of domestic violence. “So I got up and I told the kids my story,” she says. “I realized that my story was inspiring. All of it. [From] my dad breaking my nose, [to] growing up in public housing projects, [to] being poor, my four miscarriages and my daughter dying. It was all okay to talk about.” After the experience, Marshall was inspired to be her complete authentic self in corporate America. And the first thing, she made “real clear” to all her employees in North Carolina was that “Cynt” was her preferred name, and she was not letting “Cindy” slide anymore. “I just felt so comfortable being who I am,” she tells CNBC Make It. Marshall began to speak openly at work about her experiences, good and painful, and she realized that many of her colleagues had common experiences. “I was vulnerable. I volunteered at places and advocated for causes that I hadn’t previously openly supported. As a result, I became more real, down to earth and approachable” to everyone from employees to customers to “external stakeholders” like community leaders and policymakers, she says. Her vulnerability and new mindset was crucial both when she was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer in 2010 (she’s now been cancer free for about five years) and when she was appointed senior vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer at AT&T in 2015. The goal at AT&T was to transform the company into an inclusive and diverse workforce. “Diversity is being invited to the party,” Marshall has said. “Inclusion is being asked to dance.” In 2017, strategies Marshall implemented landed AT&T on Fortune’s 100 Best Places to Work list for the first time, making it one of just two Fortune 50 companies on the list.

A call from Mark Cuban


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cynt, history, cindy, mavericks, mother, marshall, making, berkeley, att, black, school, ceo, cheerleader, california, told, president, work


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‘There’s no shortcut to learning a craft,’ Grammy-winning singer Kylie Minogue says

Trying again after a failure is one of the secrets to career success, according to Grammy-award winning popstar Kylie Minogue. Speaking to CNBC’s Julianna Tatelbaum in Dubai, the Australian singer-songwriter said her advice to aspiring recording artists was to “be true to yourself” — and be willing to work hard. “The beautiful thing that I’ve discovered is experience — there’s no shortcut to learning a craft,” she said. “Some people are blessed, and they seem to have it all from the outset. I fe


Trying again after a failure is one of the secrets to career success, according to Grammy-award winning popstar Kylie Minogue.
Speaking to CNBC’s Julianna Tatelbaum in Dubai, the Australian singer-songwriter said her advice to aspiring recording artists was to “be true to yourself” — and be willing to work hard.
“The beautiful thing that I’ve discovered is experience — there’s no shortcut to learning a craft,” she said.
“Some people are blessed, and they seem to have it all from the outset.
I fe
‘There’s no shortcut to learning a craft,’ Grammy-winning singer Kylie Minogue says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singer, theres, work, trying, true, times, tatelbaum, way, craft, grammywinning, winning, learning, shortcut, thing, kylie, minogue, willing


'There's no shortcut to learning a craft,' Grammy-winning singer Kylie Minogue says

Trying again after a failure is one of the secrets to career success, according to Grammy-award winning popstar Kylie Minogue.

Speaking to CNBC’s Julianna Tatelbaum in Dubai, the Australian singer-songwriter said her advice to aspiring recording artists was to “be true to yourself” — and be willing to work hard.

“The beautiful thing that I’ve discovered is experience — there’s no shortcut to learning a craft,” she said. “Some people are blessed, and they seem to have it all from the outset. I didn’t, I had to learn. I fell over so many times, I was pushed down so many times, but you have to find your way to get through that.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, singer, theres, work, trying, true, times, tatelbaum, way, craft, grammywinning, winning, learning, shortcut, thing, kylie, minogue, willing


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Elizabeth Warren calls out Mike Bloomberg for using NDAs—here’s how they work

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has brought national attention to nondisclosure agreements this week, criticizing billionaire businessman and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg for his alleged history of inappropriate behavior toward women and using NDAs to keep employees from speaking out. Bloomberg has declined to release employees from the NDAs they’ve signed while working for him. She said Bloomberg has “never tolerated any kind of discrimination or harassment.” Many workers may be wondering ju


Sen. Elizabeth Warren has brought national attention to nondisclosure agreements this week, criticizing billionaire businessman and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg for his alleged history of inappropriate behavior toward women and using NDAs to keep employees from speaking out.
Bloomberg has declined to release employees from the NDAs they’ve signed while working for him.
She said Bloomberg has “never tolerated any kind of discrimination or harassment.”
Many workers may be wondering ju
Elizabeth Warren calls out Mike Bloomberg for using NDAs—here’s how they work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ndasheres, employee, calls, employees, mike, sign, ndas, agreements, discrimination, work, warren, harassment, employer, elizabeth, nondisclosure, nda, using, bloomberg


Elizabeth Warren calls out Mike Bloomberg for using NDAs—here's how they work

Democratic presidential hopeful Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks during the ninth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season co-hosted by NBC News, MSNBC, Noticias Telemundo and The Nevada Independent at the Paris Theater in Las Vegas, Nevada, on February 19, 2020.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has brought national attention to nondisclosure agreements this week, criticizing billionaire businessman and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg for his alleged history of inappropriate behavior toward women and using NDAs to keep employees from speaking out. Bloomberg has declined to release employees from the NDAs they’ve signed while working for him. “None of them accuse me of doing anything other than maybe they didn’t like a joke I told,” he said during Wednesday night’s Democratic debate. “These are agreements between two parties that wanted to keep it quiet, and that’s up to them. They signed those agreements, and we’ll live with it.” Warren hammered the topic again at a town hall hosted by CNN on Thursday, saying to make things “easy,” she had created a document Bloomberg could sign to release employees who no longer want to be bound by these confidentiality agreements. “All that Mayor Bloomberg has to do is sign it. I’ll text it,” she said. NDAs have come under scrutiny in recent years, as the #MeToo movement spotlighted their use in sexual harassment disputes. When reached for comment on Thursday, Bloomberg’s campaign chair did not specifically address NDAs, but touted the former mayor’s history of hiring and promoting women. She said Bloomberg has “never tolerated any kind of discrimination or harassment.” Many workers may be wondering just how common NDAs are, how they actually work, and what their rights are. We break it down below.

Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speak during the Democratic presidential primary debate at Paris Las Vegas on February 19, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Six candidates qualified for the third Democratic presidential primary debate of 2020, which comes just days before the Nevada caucuses on February 22. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

What are NDAs?

Currently, more than one-third of the U.S. workforce has been required by their employer to sign a nondisclosure agreement, reports the Harvard Business Review. These agreements, according to National Women’s Law Center legal fellow Ramya Sekaran, “prevent workers from disclosing specific types of information about their employer when they’re used in a workplace context.” “Traditionally, companies use these nondisclosure agreements to protect trade secrets,” she tells CNBC Make It. “But, since the 1980s we’ve seen that companies have expanded these nondisclosure agreements to prohibit workers from speaking up about a range of workplace conditions, which include harassment, discrimination and other types of violations of worker’s rights.” At some companies, employees are required to sign an NDA the minute they are hired in order to keep information about their employer confidential. Employees may also be asked to sign an NDA when they are terminated in exchange for severance pay, or in exchange for money after a sexual harassment or discrimination case has been settled. “Historically, when an employee brings some sort of complaint of workplace discrimination or sexual harassment action against the employer, there is a payment of a sum of money,” explains Davida Perry, co-founder and managing partner of Schwartz Perry & Heller LLP in New York City. “[This means] the case either got settled voluntarily and a payment is made. Or, if the person filed something in court and it goes to trial and the employee wins, then a payment is made.” In most cases, Perry says, an employer will only settle a case if an employee agrees to the confidential terms outlined in the NDA.

What should you know before signing one?

Perry, who has worked as an employment lawyer for more than 30 years, emphasizes that anyone who is asked to sign an NDA should know that they have the right to negotiate the terms of their agreement. Additionally, she says, any employee who is asked to sign an NDA upon being hired should be mindful of the type of work environment they may be walking into. “I don’t want to throw everybody in one box,” she says, “but I would think that if a company is very concerned about its employees talking about what goes on in the workplace then there’s [probably] something going on in that workplace that they’re worried about getting out.” Sekaran adds that in addition to reading the details of your NDA carefully, you should also research whether or not your state has a law that protects your rights under these agreements. “We’ve seen 13 states that have taken steps to either ban the use of nondisclosure agreements as a condition of employment, as well as limit the use of NDAs in settlement separation or severance agreements,” she explains. Since the start of the #MeToo movement in 2017, states like California, New York, Maryland, Arizona and many more have made adjustments to how employers can use nondisclosure agreements as it relates to employment, according to a 2019 report released by the National Women’s Law Center. In New York, for example, Sekaran explains that employers are no longer able to include an NDA in settlement agreements involving discrimination, unless the employee prefers to have one. In the event that the employee does, they then have 21 days to consider the terms of the NDA. “It’s important that in the context of settlement separation and severance agreements that NDAs are not banned completely and that victims of harassment or discrimination still have the option of requesting an NDA if that’s what they truly want,” says Sekaran, while adding that there should be guidelines “built into the law to ensure that the power imbalance between workers and their employer is addressed.”

How do you get out of an NDA?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-21  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ndasheres, employee, calls, employees, mike, sign, ndas, agreements, discrimination, work, warren, harassment, employer, elizabeth, nondisclosure, nda, using, bloomberg


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