What it’s like trying to live on minimum wage—it’s a ‘constant struggle’

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?


Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, struggle, work, support, minimum, trying, job, davis, wageits, 15, workers, nicholson, constant, raise, live


What it's like trying to live on minimum wage—it's a 'constant struggle'

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail.

Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. One of her sons has asthma, and she estimates she’s been to the emergency room for her kids six or seven times so far this year. But her cashier job at Church’s Chicken doesn’t come with paid time off and every shift is essential. “It’s stressful because I basically have to pick and choose what’s more important,” Nicholson tells CNBC Make It. “Of course my child is more important, but at the same time, I have to work and make money to be able to support and take care of them.” While Nicholson, 28, makes $8.60 an hour, $1.35 more than the federal minimum wage, thanks to a recent state increase, she says it’s still not enough money to get by, especially since her hours (and paycheck) can vary significantly week to week. “The hours are constantly shifting. I don’t have a set schedule,” Nicholson says, adding she’s notified about her start time the night before via text message. Sometimes that doesn’t come until 1 a.m. “By that time, me and my children are in bed.” Church’s did not immediately respond to a request for comment. To support herself and her kids, Nicholson is forced to rely on assistance from both her family and the government. “I’m currently homeless, so I stay with my mother,” she says, adding that she helps with rent when she can. She also relies on food stamps to buy groceries for her family. Yet even with that support, there are weeks where she doesn’t have the $15 needed to take the bus to and from work. Instead, she walks, rain, snow or sun. “You can be doing everything right and it’s still not enough,” she says. “It’s a constant struggle every day.”

A steady push toward a mandatory $15 minimum wage

What happens next

Democratic lawmakers have tried to increase the minimum wage for years, but the most recent bill, the Raise the Wage Act, introduced by Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January has gotten the furthest. The bill, which now has 203 cosponsors, is set for a House floor vote on Thursday morning. But the legislation, even if it passes the House, is far from a sure thing. Predictive intelligence firm Skopos Labs estimates the Raise the Wage Act has a 24% chance of being enacted. Many opponents of the bill say they’re concerned raising the minimum wage to $15 may cause significant job loss. A report from the Congressional Budget Office released last week found that a mandatory $15 minimum wage may eliminate as many as 3.7 million jobs across the U.S. because companies will look to cut costs. Additionally, the report projected that real income — the compensation and purchasing power you have after taking into account inflation — would fall by about $16 billion for families above the poverty line, which would reduce their total income by about 0.1% due, in part, to consumers potentially paying higher prices. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a conservative business lobby group, sent a letter to House members saying the organization had “serious concerns” about the Raise the Wage Act. It added that while it’s “willing to work with members of Congress to develop a legislative package that includes an increase guided by economic conditions, $15 per hour is not that number, and the Raise the Wage Act is not that legislation.” That same CBO report also noted, however, that a $15 federal minimum is estimated to increase wages for as many as 27 million Americans and potentially lift as many as 1.3 million families out of poverty. “The CBO’s report comes to a clear conclusion: The benefits of gradually raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour over five years far outweighs any potential costs to American workers,” Scott said during a call with reporters last week. The EPI estimates that the benefit could be even wider, calculating that 33.5 million workers would see increased wages. Of those workers, the National Women’s Law Center estimates that one in three working women would directly receive a raise. And 43% of single mothers in the U.S. would see an increased income for their families, the EPI calculates.

Moving beyond the minimum is worth fighting for

Jessica Davis, 27, who worked for years at minimum wage or near-minimum wage jobs, says she’s had to work hard for every penny she’s earned at these types of jobs. “They will make you bend over backwards and it’s crazy how much work they give you when you’re making that much money,” Davis tells CNBC Make It. Davis, who completed some college and has $14,000 in student loan debt, says the last minimum wage job she held was working at Dollar General outside Nashville, Tennessee. She worked at the store for about nine months in 2016, and spent her entire 8-to-10-hour shifts on her feet. The store was routinely understaffed, Davis says, which meant she was trying to juggle checking out customers, managing the inventory and keeping the store clean. “It’s physical,” she says, adding each shift was a workout. “They wanted me to run over to this area, open up boxes and put out stock, and then run to register every time there was a customer. And they had a customer every five to 10 minutes,” she says. “My job now is hard, but it’s nothing like the [minimum wage] jobs I used to work.” A spokeswoman for Dollar General tells CNBC Make It that the company prioritizes investing in its employees and regularly promotes from within, as well as provides opportunities to help workers realize their career aspirations. “We believe career opportunities, our competitive wages and benefits and the engaging environment we offer that is rooted in our mission of ‘serving others’ allows us to remain an employer of choice,” the company said in a statement.

There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job Jessica Davis

While working at Dollar General, Davis brought home about $1,000 a month. At the time, she split rent and utilities with her boyfriend, but housing costs still ate up about $580 a month — more than 50% of her income. There was little left for extras, let alone big life events such as getting married and starting a family. “We would be married, but that costs too,” Davis says, adding that she’d like to have a small wedding at some point. But juggling the costs and planning associated with a wedding just wasn’t feasible. “Things like that get put on the back burner.” Davis managed to find a better paying opportunity when a regular customer at Dollar General befriended her and recommended her for a tech support role. She applied and got the job, which came with a significant raise: She now earns $17.95 an hour. The higher salary allowed her to focus on herself and even dream a little — she is planning on going back to college in January. At the end of the day, having a support system is critical if you’re going to make ends meet on $7.25 an hour. Both Davis and Nicholson credit their friends and family, rather than employers, for helping them survive on minimum wage. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, struggle, work, support, minimum, trying, job, davis, wageits, 15, workers, nicholson, constant, raise, live


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Ex-Defense chief: Google has a duty to the US, not China, to ‘take our values to the battlefield’

Former Obama Defense Secretary Ash Carter told CNBC on Thursday that if Alphabet’s Google is working in China, it may be unknowingly working for the Chinese military. However, Google, whose search engine remains blocked in China, has continued to grow its AI center in Shanghai. “Google refused to work for the Pentagon on artificial intelligence,” Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. On Monday, Joe Lonsdale told CNBC that his fellow Palantir co-founder Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Go


Former Obama Defense Secretary Ash Carter told CNBC on Thursday that if Alphabet’s Google is working in China, it may be unknowingly working for the Chinese military. However, Google, whose search engine remains blocked in China, has continued to grow its AI center in Shanghai. “Google refused to work for the Pentagon on artificial intelligence,” Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. On Monday, Joe Lonsdale told CNBC that his fellow Palantir co-founder Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Go
Ex-Defense chief: Google has a duty to the US, not China, to ‘take our values to the battlefield’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, duty, work, chief, told, intelligence, going, china, google, thiels, thiel, exdefense, battlefield, working


Ex-Defense chief: Google has a duty to the US, not China, to 'take our values to the battlefield'

Former Obama Defense Secretary Ash Carter told CNBC on Thursday that if Alphabet’s Google is working in China, it may be unknowingly working for the Chinese military.

“If you’re working in China, you don’t know whether you’re working on a project for the military or not,” said Carter, whose decadeslong government career also included advisory roles to Republican presidents.

“There is a duty to this country,” he added. “We’re in debt to the society that we live in.”

Carter was responding to tech investor Peter Thiel’s calls for a government investigation into Google for its “seemingly treasonous decision to work with the Chinese military and not with the U.S. military.”

President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that his administration will “take a look” into Thiel’s claims. Thiel was a supporter of Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Google has denied working with the Chinese military.

Refusing to go as far as Thiel’s “seemingly treasonous” characterization, Carter told “Squawk Box” that Google made a “mistake” in not advancing its work with the Pentagon.

Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which focused on artificial intelligence, expired earlier this year, and it was not renewed. However, Google, whose search engine remains blocked in China, has continued to grow its AI center in Shanghai.

Carter’s comments echoed those of former Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke, who said Thiel was right to call out Google.

“Google refused to work for the Pentagon on artificial intelligence,” Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. “If you turn around and you work on artificial intelligence in China, and you don’t really know what they’re going to do with that, I think there’s an issue.”

Clarke also was White House counterterrorism coordinator under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

On Monday, Joe Lonsdale told CNBC that his fellow Palantir co-founder Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Google.

“Google is not a patriotic company, ” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. “When Google made the choice, ‘We’re not going to help the U.S., but we’re going to continue to work in China,’ it was very clear.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, values, duty, work, chief, told, intelligence, going, china, google, thiels, thiel, exdefense, battlefield, working


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Neuroscientist: Skip breakfast sometimes and 2 other simple tips to boost your brain performance

And that’s what worries brain surgeon Jandial, who calls the “smart” pills being peddled and much of the advice being doled out unproven “nonsense.” In fact, it inspired Jandial to write a book with science-backed advice on how to achieve optimal brain performance. Rahul Jandial Rahul JandialJandial tells CNBC Make It that the best ways to boost brain power for peak performance are actually easier than people think. Research has shown that fasting can help to clear the mind and awaken the senses


And that’s what worries brain surgeon Jandial, who calls the “smart” pills being peddled and much of the advice being doled out unproven “nonsense.” In fact, it inspired Jandial to write a book with science-backed advice on how to achieve optimal brain performance. Rahul Jandial Rahul JandialJandial tells CNBC Make It that the best ways to boost brain power for peak performance are actually easier than people think. Research has shown that fasting can help to clear the mind and awaken the senses
Neuroscientist: Skip breakfast sometimes and 2 other simple tips to boost your brain performance Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skip, performance, help, hours, simple, neurons, work, tips, breakfast, brain, growth, fasting, day, neuroscientist, boost, jandial


Neuroscientist: Skip breakfast sometimes and 2 other simple tips to boost your brain performance

The first time Rahul Jandial opened the skull of a living human being as a third-year medical resident at the University of California, San Diego, he knew he’d found his calling. “There’s a fear, of course, but also awe that you’re literally inside somebody’s head, which elicits intensity as well as excitement. I don’t want to sound indelicate, but for me, it’s a thrill,” Jandial says. But you don’t have to be a neurosurgeon to be fascinated by the brain. Everyone from Silicon Valley tycoons to biohackers are dabbling in cognitive performance enhancers known as nootropics, which tout improved cognition by a drop of a pill. And that’s what worries brain surgeon Jandial, who calls the “smart” pills being peddled and much of the advice being doled out unproven “nonsense.” In fact, it inspired Jandial to write a book with science-backed advice on how to achieve optimal brain performance. “I’ve known students in my medical school classes who thought they get better grades by taking ‘smart’ pills, which in truth only allowed them to work longer and harder at being just as stellar or mediocre as they were to begin with,” Jandial, a dual-trained brain surgeon and neuroscientist at City of Hope in Duarte, California writes in his new book, “Neurofitness: A Brain Surgeon’s Secrets to Boost Performance and Unleash Creativity.”

Rahul Jandial Rahul Jandial

Jandial tells CNBC Make It that the best ways to boost brain power for peak performance are actually easier than people think. Here are his top three:

1. Skipping breakfast twice a week

Intermittent fasting may be trendy, but fasting is nothing new: Several of the world’s major religions call for periodic fasting, and Jandial thinks that might have to do with how it affects the brain. Research has shown that fasting can help to clear the mind and awaken the senses while also boosting brain functioning. Two days a week, Jandial himself practices intermittent fasting — where you eat normally for eight hours a day, from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. for example, and then eat nothing except to drink water, coffee or plain tea for the other 16 hours — to boost his cognitive performance. Going without food for 16 hours (which can include the time you’re sleeping), increases your brain’s natural growth factors, he says, which essentially support the survival and growth of your brain’s neurons. The neurons are what allow information to be transmitted between areas of the brain and the rest of the body’s nervous system. So if your neurons are healthy and operating at full capacity, information will be transmitted faster and more clearly, he says, meaning you will be more focused and be able to obtain and store information more easily, improving cognitive performance. Other research from John Hopkins has also found that intermittent fasting may help your “brain ward off neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s while at the same improving memory and mood.” Jandial says an easy trick to help get 16 hours is to skip breakfast (which he actually does every day). Though breakfast has been dubbed the most important meal of the day, he says there is no evidence to support that theory. He himself practices 16-hour intermittent fasting on Mondays and Thursdays (to do non-consecutive days), skipping both breakfast and lunch and eating all his daily calories for dinner. He says while he sticks to the MIND diet (which consists of whole foods like fruit, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and nuts—as well as fish and some poultry) for brain benefits, “it doesn’t matter how much you eat or what you eat.” However, Jandial suggests individuals consult with their own doctor before trying any fast. Experts advise against some people, including the elderly, pregnant women and children, doing any type of fasting. And they caution there are risks with extreme fasts and fasting that lasts longer than 24 hours.

2. Deep breathing

To calm the mind before heading into a stressful work or life situation, Jandial suggests doing five minutes of slow, deep breathing. “Before you have to go see your boss or before you pull into that parking spot at work, just find a place to slowly breath in through your nose for a count of four, and then hold your breathe for a few seconds and then exhale slowly through your mouth for a count of four,” he says. Doing this “meditative breathing” two times a day will help calm the neurons in your brain, he says, which will also help your thoughts be “faster, quicker, and more original,” and he adds that this is typically when a person’s peak performance comes in. Mindful breathing’s brain-boosting powers are backed up by research: A study at the University of Oregon found that just 11 days of mindful breathing for an hour each day through a technique called integrative body-mind training (IBMT) “induces positive structural changes in brain connectivity by boosting efficiency in a part of the brain that helps a person regulate behavior in accordance with their goals.” Jandial adds that improved connectivity across different corners of your brain is directly involved in decision-making, impulse control and focus.

3. Being vertical

Stand or walk as much as possible at work, says Jandial. “The brain is meant to be on a vertical body and when a person is standing or walking, the brain showers itself with BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, essentially a protein for the brain). BDNF is not a hormone like estrogen, it’s a growth factor. It’s like miracle grow for the flesh of the brain,” he says. Your brain thrives off these growth factors, according to Jandial, because they help to maintain the health of the 90 billion neurons humans have in our skulls, which ultimately improves the electrical communications between them and therefore brain performance. He says by being vertical, you are essentially giving yourself a brain drug like a nootropics without taking a pill or supplement. “Most people don’t realize that they already have the right ‘brain drugs’ inside them to help perform better,” he says. Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook. Don’t miss: Working long hours for a decade can increase stroke risk by 45%—here’s what can help A performance-enhancing pill based on the gut bacteria of elite athletes is in the works


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skip, performance, help, hours, simple, neurons, work, tips, breakfast, brain, growth, fasting, day, neuroscientist, boost, jandial


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Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate. Google has denied working with the Chinese military. When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, th


Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate. Google has denied working with the Chinese military. When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, th
Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, china, peter, white, exwhite, clarke, working, work, google, cybersecurity, thiel, chinese, think, chief, right, thiels


Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday.

“Here’s what I think is true: Google refused to work for the Pentagon on artificial intelligence,” said Richard Clarke, whose 30-year government career also included stints as White House counterterrorism coordinator under former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Clarke was referencing Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which expired earlier this year and was not renewed.

“If you turn around and you work on artificial intelligence in China, and you don’t really know what they’re going to do with that, I think there’s an issue,” Clarke said in a “Squawk Box” interview.

In 2017, Google opened an AI center in Shanghai to focus on education and machine language learning. However, the search engine is still blocked in the country.

Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate.

In response, President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that his administration will “take a look” into Google. Thiel was a supporter of Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Google has denied working with the Chinese military.

When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, the cybersecurity expert said Wednesday that the U.S. tech giant is working on AI projects there. “Do you think there’s a real distinction” between Chinese companies and the Chinese government, he asked, rhetorically.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, china, peter, white, exwhite, clarke, working, work, google, cybersecurity, thiel, chinese, think, chief, right, thiels


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WHO declares global health emergency as deadly Ebola outbreak in the Congo spreads

The deadly Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization days after a case of the virus was confirmed in the Congolese city Goma, which borders neighboring country Rwanda. The WHO defines an international emergency as “an extraordinary event which is determined to constitute a public health risk to other states through the international spread of disease and to potentially require a coordinated international response.


The deadly Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization days after a case of the virus was confirmed in the Congolese city Goma, which borders neighboring country Rwanda. The WHO defines an international emergency as “an extraordinary event which is determined to constitute a public health risk to other states through the international spread of disease and to potentially require a coordinated international response.
WHO declares global health emergency as deadly Ebola outbreak in the Congo spreads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spread, declares, work, world, spreads, virus, international, drc, emergency, ebola, global, deadly, congo, health, outbreak, tedros


WHO declares global health emergency as deadly Ebola outbreak in the Congo spreads

The deadly Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization days after a case of the virus was confirmed in the Congolese city Goma, which borders neighboring country Rwanda.

So far, more than 1,600 people have died and more than 2,500 have been diagnosed with the virus in the war-torn North Kivu and Ituri provinces of the DRC since the epidemic began in August.

“It is time for the world to take notice and redouble our efforts. We need to work together in solidarity with the DRC to end this outbreak and build a better health system,” WHO director-general Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement Wednesday. “Extraordinary work has been done for almost a year under the most difficult circumstances. We all owe it to these responders — coming from not just WHO but also government, partners and communities — to shoulder more of the burden.”

This is the second-deadliest outbreak of Ebola since the West African epidemic that killed 11,310 and infected 28,616 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia from 2014 to 2016.

The WHO defines an international emergency as “an extraordinary event which is determined to constitute a public health risk to other states through the international spread of disease and to potentially require a coordinated international response.”

Though there is high risk of the virus spreading regionally, the threat of it developing outside of the area is still low, Tedros said.

The WHO previously declined three times to declare the outbreak as an international health emergency, to the ire of many health experts who warned the virus had a potential to spread across borders. This is the fifth time in history that a global health emergency has been declared.

Responders have been using an experimental vaccine made by New Jersey-based Merck & Co in an attempt to quell the spread of the virus.

More than 140,000 people in the DRC have been immunized so far.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spread, declares, work, world, spreads, virus, international, drc, emergency, ebola, global, deadly, congo, health, outbreak, tedros


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Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize


To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize
Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thinking, work, hurting, welch, simple, help, youre, team, arrogant, suzy, career, quiz, success, type, ego, determine


Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

Meanwhile, Welch says, “people who swell — all they are is arrogant, which gets old fast, and thus, is usually a one-way ticket to self-destruction.”

“Stars, you must make sure you’re in the former category,” she tells CNBC Make It . “People who grow exude a healthy self-confidence. They’re learners, builders and team players, and because of that, their career tends to keep soaring.”

But others respond differently to a taste of success. They act exclusively in their own interest, talk over people, and curtail others’ advancement. To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.”

Maybe you’ve seen this unfold in your workplace. Some people, given more responsibility, rise to the challenge. They build new skills, take on bigger projects, and stretch themselves to meet the demands of their new role.

To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:

1. Do you spend more time thinking about…

A. Your next promotion

B. The career growth of the people who work with you

“Answer A,” says Welch, “is for arrogant in this case, because arrogant people are so me, me, me.” On the other hand, she says, “self-confident people are you, you, you, which, for every reason under the sun, including trust and loyalty, is better, better, better.”

2. In meetings do you usually…

A. Urge subordinates or colleagues to jump in and answer questions

B. Jump in and answer every question yourself

If you’re someone who loves the sound of your own voice, Welch says, “that’s a surefire red flag that you are too focused on yourself.”

3. If someone on your team is smarter than you are, do you think…

A. How great!

B. How annoying

“Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Meanwhile, arrogant people “don’t think anyone is smarter than they are, and it bugs them that other people do.”

As a result, she says, “instead of listening to their intelligent teammates, they try to shut them down or shove them out,” which is, ultimately, “team killing and self-defeating.”

Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasizes that it’s essential to your future professional success. And arrogance, she says, isn’t actually all that difficult to unlearn.

After all, “it’s all in your head.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Helen Zhao

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

More from Suzy Welch:

There’s a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here’s why

Why working from home can be terrible for your career

3 signs it’s time to quit a bad boss


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thinking, work, hurting, welch, simple, help, youre, team, arrogant, suzy, career, quiz, success, type, ego, determine


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Here’s how to know if you’re confident or arrogant at work

7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.


7 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.
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Here's how to know if you're confident or arrogant at work

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CNBC contributor Suzy Welch explains why it’s integral to your success that you approach your career with confidence instead of arrogance. She put together a quiz so you can find out which camp you belong in.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, quiz, success, work, heres, welch, browser, youre, flash, site, arrogant, suzy, try, enabled, confident, view


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‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M


Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M
‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


'Google is not a patriotic company,' says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google.

“Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC.

Lonsdale was responding to the criticism levied since Thiel on Sunday said the FBI and the CIA should investigate whether Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence.

Thiel, also a Facebook board member and a supporter of Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was speaking at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington, D.C., and Axios reported on his speech.

“Everyone in [Silicon] Valley knows that the Chinese government is very involved,” Lonsdale told “Squawk Alley” in an interview, though he didn’t point to any clear evidence. “It’s something we don’t talk about a lot. It was very courageous of [Thiel] to talk about it.”

Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.”

The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. “There’s nationalists in China coming and taking whatever they can learn and taking it back and using it for their own nationalist purposes.”

Lonsdale also commented on Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which expired earlier this year and was not renewed. “When Google made the choice ‘we’re not going to help the U.S., but we’re going to continue to work in China,’ it was very clear,” Lonsdale said of the company’s patriotism.

Silicon Valley-based Palantir, the data analytics miner, has worked with many agencies of the U.S. government, including the Defense Department, CIA and FBI. Lonsdale on Monday called Palantir “probably the most patriotic in the Valley.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


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Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals

Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec. Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of cert


Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec. Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of cert
Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tent, factory, production, harsh, took, employees, meet, model, tesla, say, worked, ga4, shortcuts, work, tape, workers, goals


Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals

Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. Mason Trinca | The Washington Post | Getty Images

Current and former Tesla employees working in the company’s open-air “tent” factory say they were pressured to take shortcuts to hit aggressive Model 3 production goals, including making fast fixes to plastic housings with electrical tape, working through harsh conditions and skipping previously required vehicle tests. For instance, four people who worked on the assembly line say they were told by supervisors to use electrical tape to patch cracks on plastic brackets and housings, and provided photographs showing where tape was applied. They and four additional people familiar with conditions there describe working through high heat, cold temperatures at night and smoky air during last year’s wildfires in Northern California. Their disclosures highlight the difficult balance Tesla must strike as it ramps up production while trying to stem costs. Tesla recently told shareholders that in the three months that ended June 30, it made 87,048 vehicles, including 72,531 Model 3s, the company’s lowest-priced sedan. Both were quarterly records. Tesla told shareholders to expect full-year deliveries this year to reach at least 360,000, and more than 250,000 of those are expected to be Model 3s. Last year, Tesla conquered some “production hell” issues, as CEO Elon Musk called them. That included removing or repurposing conveyors and robots that didn’t work as planned, and figuring out how to build cars and battery packs with more manual labor. This year, Tesla has been grappling with what could be described as “logistics hell.” It has had to deliver cars to customers in more points around the world than ever before. Tesla executives have said the company should be profitable in the second half of 2019. A Tesla spokesperson said the anecdotes employees shared about work in the tent are “misleading and do not reflect our manufacturing practices or what it’s like to work at Tesla.” The spokesperson said many of the shortcuts described by employees, such as using electrical tape during assembly, are not approved procedures, and that cars are rigorously inspected before shipping. Tesla also said many of the parts used in the Model 3 come with electrical tape on them from suppliers, and showed CNBC photographs of some factory-taped parts. The company said its first-pass yields at the Fremont, California, plant are higher than ever — a measurement that indicates Tesla is producing good cars and is scrapping or reworking fewer units than it did historically. Regarding working conditions in the tent, Tesla said, “We work hard to create a work environment that is as safe, fair and fun as possible, and it is incredibly important to us that employees look forward to coming to work every day. In fact, we have a large number of employees who request to work on GA4 based on what they hear from colleagues and what they have seen first-hand.”

A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Reuters | Stephen Lam

Pressure to produce under the tent

Tesla assembles some of its Model 3s in a tent, known as GA4 ( “general assembly 4”) in Fremont. Built in spring 2018, it was supposed to be a temporary measure. The idea was to run the tent mostly on manual labor while Tesla perfected its automated factory lines indoors in what’s called “the brick.” The tent has now been operating for more than a year. Workers told CNBC that GA4 is now able to produce up to 120 cars per shift, across three shifts per day, amounting to 2,160 Model 3s in a perfect six-day week, or around 30,000 per quarter assuming maximum rates of production. Tesla did not confirm these numbers, but in a statement last year, the company said GA4 was responsible for about 20% of total Model 3 production during a high-output week in July 2018. While the tented line does not crank out the majority of Tesla’s Model 3s, it still adds significant volume. When Model 3 lines inside the Fremont factory go down, workers in the tent can stay productive. That’s important to Tesla, given its history of over-automation and missed targets. In the tent, Model 3s are put together using manual labor and power tools, lifts and conveyors, but not with any of the sophisticated robotics Tesla uses on the indoor assembly lines. Workers say they do one process at their station repeatedly, usually walking along the line with the car until they’re done. Carlos Aranda was a former lead production associate who worked in GA4. Correspondence shared with CNBC shows he resigned from Tesla on June 24, following months of medical leave stemming from injuries he says he sustained on the job. (Tesla claims he was fired for a Twitter post that went against its Workplace Violence Policy, but provided no record of the offending tweet.) His wife, Maggie Aranda, worked as a Model 3 production associate in another part of GA4. She says she was dismissed on June 11 for using her phone during a shift to book health appointments after an injury. Both the Arandas previously worked on indoor assembly lines at the factory. Six current and former employees supported their accounts of work in GA4 but asked to remain unidentified. These people said that while work in GA4 is physically demanding, many people like working there because the atmosphere is good and camaraderie is strong. They said they can listen to music while they work, with a supervisor’s approval, and don’t always have to wear a uniform. At the same time, workers were encouraged to take shortcuts to hit their production goals in the tent, according to five people who work or worked there recently. For example, when it’s cold in the tent, workers tend to break a high number of plastic brackets and housings that hold critical electronics in place inside of the Model 3, according to four of these people. Rather than waiting for replenishment teams to deliver boxes of new plastic parts to their stations in GA4, they said, supervisors told workers to use vinyl electrical tape to make quick fixes. Carlos Aranda says he personally visited Walmart multiple times to buy the tape and other items for production associates. For instance, this photo shows tape applied to a segment of a white plastic housing where it holds “triple cam” connections in place inside of a Model 3. The Arandas said the edge of this plastic housing piece would frequently crack during installation, and tape was often applied here to hold down the resulting, hinge-like flap.

A photograph sent by a Tesla employee showing how electrical tape was used during Model 3 assembly.

Installed in the windshield of a Model 3, a “triple cam” holds three cameras that allow the vehicle to see the road, traffic lights, lane markings and obstacles ahead. If triple cam connections loosen or break, some of Tesla’s safety features — like Sentry mode, AutoPilot, automatic emergency braking or full self-driving — may fail, the Arandas said. The car should then give drivers an alert that AutoPilot is no longer engaged, and the car needs service. Tesla said many of the parts they use in the Model 3 come with electrical tape on them from suppliers, and showed CNBC photographs of some factory-taped parts. Current and former GA4 workers acknowledged this, too. However, they made a distinction — the GA4 workers use tape to fix housings or brackets with cracks or to stop parts from vibrating in the car if they aren’t snapped or fastened in perfectly. That’s not the same as “factory tape,” they said. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. Much of it is wound carefully around bundles of cables and wires in a perfect spiral. The tape that workers would apply in a Model 3 typically has hastily cut or torn ends and varies in placement. A Tesla spokesperson says the company hasn’t found evidence of electrical tape being used to make quick fixes in GA4, and would never officially condone or encourage it. The company also emphasized that its cars go through rigorous quality inspections before they leave the factory. A former Tesla technician, who worked in the tent on Model 3s and asked to remain unidentified, analyzed photos from GA4 that were shared with CNBC by current and former employees. This person said Tesla’s vehicle engineers would probably not appreciate that Model 3s were being assembled with this cheap vinyl electrical tape, and any processes allowing prodigious use of the tape during assembly should be reevaluated. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec.

Other short cuts

Workers say they took other short cuts to hit aggressive new production targets, too. Five people who work or worked in the tent in 2019 said they would frequently pass cars down the line that they knew were missing a few bolts, nuts or lugs, all in the name of saving time. In the tent, most workers have just a couple of minutes to complete a process. If a small item was missing, or a bolt was not torqued in perfectly, they would rather keep cars moving than stop the line and be seen as a bottleneck to production, they said. In particular, these people said, aeroshields are often missing a middle bolt, and loose connections in body controllers are a common issue. For example, this photo shows the power supply for a distribution block in the front right vehicle controller in a Model 3. A nut is missing that should be there to secure electrical connections.

Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of certain bolts, nuts or lugs in a rush to hit their Model 3 production goals.

Wires in this part of the car go to the touchscreen, car computer, door latches and window regulators on the right hand side of the Model 3, while the red cable distributes power into the systems on the right hand side. Although it’s a low-voltage connection, if it’s not properly secured, it can heat up and cause problems, the former Tesla technician said. Model 3s with loose connections can be hard to detect during inspections, the ex-technician and factory workers said. Tesla said the company “has a robust quality assurance team that reviews each vehicle at the end of the GA4 assembly line to ensure every car was built correctly and is perfect before it leaves our factory to go to customers.” Current and former employees also said Tesla reduced “water testing” on cars as the company began ramping up production of Model 3s. In a water test, a vehicle goes into a booth where jets blast it with water from all different directions. Any leaks in the seals are immediately found and fixed. The tests take about 10 minutes each. In late 2018, Tesla changed its policy and now only conducts sample testing for water leaks on Model 3s. Since then, if workers see an issue with the urethane seals around a Model 3 glass roof, for example, they can request a water test. But many in GA4 are hesitant to make that request because of time pressure and a lack of experience or training that they need to identify flaws, a current associate said. A Tesla spokesperson said the company is not aware of any instances where workers were told not to do water testing because that may slow production. The company says it encourages employees to identify opportunities for improvement, and engage all appropriate teams to evaluate potential risks and identify possible solutions. In addition, six current and prior employees said, workers often violated a rule that cars should only be driven in “factory mode,” which now limits speed to 10 mph. Workers would sneak freshly built Model 3s out of factory mode to zip them over to a camera calibration station (or “cam cal”), which was located far away from the GA4 tent. (That station has since been moved closer to the tent.) Employees caught doing this would be appropriately disciplined, Tesla said. Mike Ramsey, senior automotive research director at Gartner, said that even before Tesla put a Model 3 assembly line in a tent, it had a “ship-it-now, fix-it-later” mentality inspired by software patching. Tesla’s focus, instead, has been to exceed expectations in other areas like brand, vehicle acceleration or charging, he said. While Tesla has been successful with those efforts, he said: “Every time a car rolls off the lot and a piece of trim falls off, or an electrical system is failing after a month, it undermines the brand. That customer is not likely to buy another Tesla.” Ramsey also said, “The idea that you would not stop the line, and would patch something with spit and bailing wire — OK, not literally that, but close to it — almost certainly injects quality issues down the road that they are going to have to fix.”

Exposed to the elements

Exposure to the elements in GA4 poses another problem for the workers. Six current and recent Tesla employees said GA4 workers have repeatedly asked Tesla’s environmental health and safety teams to help with cold temperatures overnight, sweltering heat during the days, and pests — including mice and bugs — in the tent. They say workers commonly deal with heat rash and heat exhaustion. Tesla installed big fans in GA4 to distribute heat and circulate air. However they are not on consistently, these people said, and usually don’t make a big difference. Tesla said its environmental health and safety team monitors temperatures to ensure they are within a comfortable range for the safety of employees, production equipment and car parts. They also said they provide temperature controls like cool fans, hydration, rest breaks and heat stress awareness training to employees. Hot, dry conditions can also lead to problems with air quality. Correspondence reviewed by CNBC shows that Tesla required GA4 workers to report for duty even as wildfire smoke floated up from the massive Camp Fire that devastated Northern California in November. On Nov. 9, the day after the Camp Fire ignited, the AirNow Air Quality Index rated Fremont at an “unhealthy” 165, and continued in the unhealthy range for at least another week. Tesla did not proactively distribute respirator masks to GA4 workers in the first few days after the Camp Fire began. Workers had to request the masks, according to internal correspondence shared with CNBC. Inside the building portion of the factory they had HVAC and good air flow, but tent workers were stuck, said Maggie Aranda, and they did not get time off due to the smoke. Tesla says it offered air filter masks who those who wanted them and provided face masks every day as a precautionary measure. When conditions turn cold and wet, other problems arise. For instance, this photo shows rain seeping into the tented roof at GA4.

Rain seeps through a tent above Tesla’s GA4 Model 3 assembly line in Fremont, Calif.

Employees wear layers, and big coats that can impede their movement. Supervisors distribute disposable hand-warming packets that workers slip into their gloves or tape to their bodies. Tesla provided big red jackets for GA4 workers last year, but stopped distributing them by early 2019, according to several current and former employees. On cold nights early this year, workers in a tented “paint hospital” sometimes used heat lamps, which are used to dry paint and clear coat on cars, to warm their own bodies, according to current and former production associates. This paint hospital has since been moved indoors, according to public records with the city of Fremont. At a GA4 station where employees checked Model 3 vehicle alignment, Carlos Aranda said, workers used space heaters in late 2018. But when it rained, water seeping into the tent from above and below made these a hazard, he said. He shared photos of a leaking roof and space heater there, plugged in, with rain puddling nearby. Tesla says using space heaters is against company policy.

Tesla workers build cars in a tented assembly line called “GA4” where they are exposed to the elements, including big temperature swings and rain.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tent, factory, production, harsh, took, employees, meet, model, tesla, say, worked, ga4, shortcuts, work, tape, workers, goals


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Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella under scrutiny for work with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff

Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella will take the helm of the department following the resignation Friday of Alex Acosta, who faced scrutiny over his role in prosecuting alleged sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein more than a decade ago. But Pizzella, currently deputy Labor secretary, has his own controversial past that will likely come to the fore. Democratic senators and civil rights groups have expressed concern about Pizzella’s prior work with disgraced Republican lobbyist Jack Abram


Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella will take the helm of the department following the resignation Friday of Alex Acosta, who faced scrutiny over his role in prosecuting alleged sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein more than a decade ago. But Pizzella, currently deputy Labor secretary, has his own controversial past that will likely come to the fore. Democratic senators and civil rights groups have expressed concern about Pizzella’s prior work with disgraced Republican lobbyist Jack Abram
Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella under scrutiny for work with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, work, abramoff, served, pizzella, worker, patrick, deputy, scrutiny, lobbyist, jack, pizzellas, secretary, wage, incoming, disgraced


Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella under scrutiny for work with disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff

Incoming acting Labor Secretary Patrick Pizzella will take the helm of the department following the resignation Friday of Alex Acosta, who faced scrutiny over his role in prosecuting alleged sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein more than a decade ago.

But Pizzella, currently deputy Labor secretary, has his own controversial past that will likely come to the fore. Democratic senators and civil rights groups have expressed concern about Pizzella’s prior work with disgraced Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff in the late 1990s and early 2000s to hamper worker protections in the Northern Mariana Islands.

When Pizzella worked on Abramoff’s team at Preston Gates Ellis & Rouvelas Meeds, the lobbying firm was pushing to prevent Congress from imposing minimum wage laws on the Northern Mariana Islands. At the time, there were “maximum” wage restrictions on the islands of $3.05 per hour for foreign workers, according to the Center for Investigative Reporting.

“Foreign workers pay up to $7,000 to employers or middlemen for the right to a job in the CNMI. When they finally reach the Commonwealth, they are assigned to tedious, low paying work for long hours with little or no time off. At night they are locked in prison-like barracks,” one government report found.

Abramoff was sentenced to six years in prison on fraud-related charges in 2006. He served four years and was released in 2010.

The Labor Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment. A White House spokesman said he was unaware of the controversy related to Pizzella.

“I have no idea what that’s about,” said Steven Groves, a White House deputy press secretary.

Pizzella’s history with the lobbyist came up during his confirmation hearings in 2017.

“You’ve been nominated to a position where you’ll be closely involved with enforcing minimum wage laws and other worker protections. Yet, as we discussed in my office, one of the key issues you lobbied on was to block bipartisan legislation for basic worker protections in the Northern Mariana Islands, where garment manufacturers could produce clothing labeled made in the U.S.A. without having to comply with U.S. minimum wage laws,” former Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., told him at the time.

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights accused Pizzella that fall of working with Abramoff to lobby for policies “that essentially allowed for unchecked slave labor to be performed with the imprimatur of the ‘Made in the U.S.A.’ label on goods and clothing.”

In a statement Friday, Kristine Lucius, the group’s executive vice president for policy and government affairs, said Pizzella’s record “shows he has a clear bias against working people’s rights – which may be good for Trump’s agenda, but bad for the people the department is meant to serve.”

“Mr. Pizzella’s past gives us great concern about how he will lead and we will be watching closely,” Lucius said.

At the 2017 hearing, Pizzella sought to distance himself from his work with Abramoff, and emphasized that he was not among the 21 Abramoff associates who were convicted of or pleaded guilty to wrongdoing in connection with their work.

Abramoff ultimately endorsed Pizzella’s appointment to deputy Labor secretary. Pizzella was confirmed by the Senate in April 2018 in a party-line vote.

“I think it shows that the Trump administration is trying to get somebody who’s really experienced, smart and somebody who really knows the issues,” Abramoff told the Center for Investigative Reporting.

Pizzella’s role as deputy Labor secretary was among the reasons that some top labor leaders did not push for Acosta to resign, Bloomberg Law reported in February.

Pizzella had previously served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. From 2004 to 2005, he served as a member of the board of directors of Overseas Private Investment Corp., according to his official biography. President Barack Obama appointed Pizzella as a member of the Federal Labor Relations Authority and he was confirmed by the Senate to the position in 2013. Trump named him acting chairman of the FLRA in 2017.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, work, abramoff, served, pizzella, worker, patrick, deputy, scrutiny, lobbyist, jack, pizzellas, secretary, wage, incoming, disgraced


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