House passes bill to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour

The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise. Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report


The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise. Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, federal, minimum, hike, raise, passes, pay, legislation, house, hour, 15, workers, bill, wages


House passes bill to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour

Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds up seven-year-old Kassidy Durham of Durham, North Carolina, during a news conference prior to a vote on the Raise the Wage Act July 18, 2019 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

The House passed a bill Thursday to hike the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour in a win for liberal activists who have long pushed to give low-wage workers a raise.

The Democratic-held chamber passed the plan in a 231-199 vote. Six Democrats opposed it, while three Republicans supported it.

The measure would gradually hike the U.S. pay floor to $15 by 2025, then index further hikes to median wage growth. It would also phase out lower minimum wage paid to tipped workers.

House Democrats view the legislation as a core piece of their agenda to boost pay and economic growth. As President Donald Trump runs for reelection in 2020, the party argues strong economic growth and a roaring stock market have not done enough to lift the workers who most need relief.

“I commend my colleagues for taking this important step towards creating an economy that works for everyone,” said Rep. Bobby Scott, a Virginia Democrat who introduced the legislation, in a statement. “Now, Senate Republicans must decide to either stand with American workers or turn their backs on hardworking people across the country.”

Congress last raised the federal minimum wage to $7.25 per hour about a decade ago. Now, 29 states and Washington D.C. have higher pay floors than the U.S., while seven states have approved $15 per hour minimum wages. Those increases have boosted pay for the working class despite the federal inaction.

The bill has little chance of becoming law before next November’s election. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has no plans to bring the legislation up in his chamber. On Thursday, he told Fox Business Network that it would “depress the economy at a time of economic boom,” adding, “we’re not going to be doing that in the Senate.”

The White House also warned this week that Trump would veto the measure if it came to his desk. The Trump administration argued its policies are “driving economic growth and increasing workers’ take-home pay far more effectively and efficiently” than the Democratic plan. The White House contended it would “eliminate jobs and reduce total wages for American workers.”

In an analysis earlier this month, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated the bill would give 17 million U.S. workers a raise — and could lift wages for millions more. It would also boost the annual income of 1.3 million people above the poverty level.

At the same time, the measure would cause about 1.3 million Americans to lose jobs, according to the CBO. It would also “reduce business income and raise prices” as companies pass on higher labor costs, the CBO said.

Here are the main pieces of the Raise the Wage Act:

It would increase the federal pay floor to $15 per hour by 2025, then index future increase to median wage gains.

The minimum wage hikes would take effect on the following schedule: $8.40 in 2019, $9.50 in 2020, $10.60 in 2021, $11.70 in 2022, $12.80 in 2023, $13.90 in 2024 and $15 in 2025.

It would eventually drop the lower minimum wage for tipped workers.

The bill would eliminate a seldom used pay floor for teen workers that pays them less than the minimum wage.

It would also toss out subminimum wages for workers with disabilities.

An amendment adopted Thursday, proposed by Rep. Tom O’Halleran, requires a Government Accountability Office report on the effects of minimum wage increases. House and Senate committees could use the report to recommend changes to curb any negative effects of the bill.

Activists such as Fight for $15, a movement started by striking fast food workers, helped to spur $15 per hour minimum wage laws around the country. In a tweet, the group said: “Organizing workers. Strikes work. We’re not even close to done!”

RaiseTheWageNow

Some major business groups opposed the legislation. Sean Kennedy, executive vice president of public affairs at the National Restaurant Association, which represents more than 500,000 restaurant businesses, called it “the wrong wage at the wrong time, implemented in the wrong way.”

National Federation of Independent Business President and CEO Juanita Duggan also called the plan a “devastating blow to small business.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, federal, minimum, hike, raise, passes, pay, legislation, house, hour, 15, workers, bill, wages


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What it’s like trying to live on minimum wage—it’s a ‘constant struggle’

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?


Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail. Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story?
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, struggle, work, support, minimum, trying, job, davis, wageits, 15, workers, nicholson, constant, raise, live


What it's like trying to live on minimum wage—it's a 'constant struggle'

Many Americans are striving to live off minimum wage jobs, many of which are in fast food and retail.

Dougleshia Nicholson is a single mother of six trying to survive on minimum wage in Kansas City, Missouri. One of her sons has asthma, and she estimates she’s been to the emergency room for her kids six or seven times so far this year. But her cashier job at Church’s Chicken doesn’t come with paid time off and every shift is essential. “It’s stressful because I basically have to pick and choose what’s more important,” Nicholson tells CNBC Make It. “Of course my child is more important, but at the same time, I have to work and make money to be able to support and take care of them.” While Nicholson, 28, makes $8.60 an hour, $1.35 more than the federal minimum wage, thanks to a recent state increase, she says it’s still not enough money to get by, especially since her hours (and paycheck) can vary significantly week to week. “The hours are constantly shifting. I don’t have a set schedule,” Nicholson says, adding she’s notified about her start time the night before via text message. Sometimes that doesn’t come until 1 a.m. “By that time, me and my children are in bed.” Church’s did not immediately respond to a request for comment. To support herself and her kids, Nicholson is forced to rely on assistance from both her family and the government. “I’m currently homeless, so I stay with my mother,” she says, adding that she helps with rent when she can. She also relies on food stamps to buy groceries for her family. Yet even with that support, there are weeks where she doesn’t have the $15 needed to take the bus to and from work. Instead, she walks, rain, snow or sun. “You can be doing everything right and it’s still not enough,” she says. “It’s a constant struggle every day.”

A steady push toward a mandatory $15 minimum wage

What happens next

Democratic lawmakers have tried to increase the minimum wage for years, but the most recent bill, the Raise the Wage Act, introduced by Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January has gotten the furthest. The bill, which now has 203 cosponsors, is set for a House floor vote on Thursday morning. But the legislation, even if it passes the House, is far from a sure thing. Predictive intelligence firm Skopos Labs estimates the Raise the Wage Act has a 24% chance of being enacted. Many opponents of the bill say they’re concerned raising the minimum wage to $15 may cause significant job loss. A report from the Congressional Budget Office released last week found that a mandatory $15 minimum wage may eliminate as many as 3.7 million jobs across the U.S. because companies will look to cut costs. Additionally, the report projected that real income — the compensation and purchasing power you have after taking into account inflation — would fall by about $16 billion for families above the poverty line, which would reduce their total income by about 0.1% due, in part, to consumers potentially paying higher prices. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a conservative business lobby group, sent a letter to House members saying the organization had “serious concerns” about the Raise the Wage Act. It added that while it’s “willing to work with members of Congress to develop a legislative package that includes an increase guided by economic conditions, $15 per hour is not that number, and the Raise the Wage Act is not that legislation.” That same CBO report also noted, however, that a $15 federal minimum is estimated to increase wages for as many as 27 million Americans and potentially lift as many as 1.3 million families out of poverty. “The CBO’s report comes to a clear conclusion: The benefits of gradually raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour over five years far outweighs any potential costs to American workers,” Scott said during a call with reporters last week. The EPI estimates that the benefit could be even wider, calculating that 33.5 million workers would see increased wages. Of those workers, the National Women’s Law Center estimates that one in three working women would directly receive a raise. And 43% of single mothers in the U.S. would see an increased income for their families, the EPI calculates.

Moving beyond the minimum is worth fighting for

Jessica Davis, 27, who worked for years at minimum wage or near-minimum wage jobs, says she’s had to work hard for every penny she’s earned at these types of jobs. “They will make you bend over backwards and it’s crazy how much work they give you when you’re making that much money,” Davis tells CNBC Make It. Davis, who completed some college and has $14,000 in student loan debt, says the last minimum wage job she held was working at Dollar General outside Nashville, Tennessee. She worked at the store for about nine months in 2016, and spent her entire 8-to-10-hour shifts on her feet. The store was routinely understaffed, Davis says, which meant she was trying to juggle checking out customers, managing the inventory and keeping the store clean. “It’s physical,” she says, adding each shift was a workout. “They wanted me to run over to this area, open up boxes and put out stock, and then run to register every time there was a customer. And they had a customer every five to 10 minutes,” she says. “My job now is hard, but it’s nothing like the [minimum wage] jobs I used to work.” A spokeswoman for Dollar General tells CNBC Make It that the company prioritizes investing in its employees and regularly promotes from within, as well as provides opportunities to help workers realize their career aspirations. “We believe career opportunities, our competitive wages and benefits and the engaging environment we offer that is rooted in our mission of ‘serving others’ allows us to remain an employer of choice,” the company said in a statement.

There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job Jessica Davis

While working at Dollar General, Davis brought home about $1,000 a month. At the time, she split rent and utilities with her boyfriend, but housing costs still ate up about $580 a month — more than 50% of her income. There was little left for extras, let alone big life events such as getting married and starting a family. “We would be married, but that costs too,” Davis says, adding that she’d like to have a small wedding at some point. But juggling the costs and planning associated with a wedding just wasn’t feasible. “Things like that get put on the back burner.” Davis managed to find a better paying opportunity when a regular customer at Dollar General befriended her and recommended her for a tech support role. She applied and got the job, which came with a significant raise: She now earns $17.95 an hour. The higher salary allowed her to focus on herself and even dream a little — she is planning on going back to college in January. At the end of the day, having a support system is critical if you’re going to make ends meet on $7.25 an hour. Both Davis and Nicholson credit their friends and family, rather than employers, for helping them survive on minimum wage. “Nobody can make it by themselves living on minimum wage,” Davis says. “There’s no way one person could pay for bills every month with a minimum wage job.” Check out: Full-time minimum wage workers cannot afford a 2-bedroom rental anywhere in the US Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
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The House just voted to give 33 million workers a raise—here’s what has to happen to make it a reality

On Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 over the next six years. The Raise the Wage Act, introduced Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January, would effectively raise wages for 33 million workers, according to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute. The Raise the Wage Act would also create an equal minimum wage for Americans with disabilities. What needs to happen to make $15 minimum a realityWhile the H


On Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 over the next six years. The Raise the Wage Act, introduced Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January, would effectively raise wages for 33 million workers, according to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute. The Raise the Wage Act would also create an equal minimum wage for Americans with disabilities. What needs to happen to make $15 minimum a realityWhile the H
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
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The House just voted to give 33 million workers a raise—here's what has to happen to make it a reality

U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds up seven-year-old Kassidy Durham of Durham, North Carolina, during a news conference prior to a vote on the Raise the Wage Act July 18, 2019 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

On Thursday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 over the next six years. Yet the new standard has a long way to go before it could affect your wallet. The Raise the Wage Act, introduced Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in January, would effectively raise wages for 33 million workers, according to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute. Nine in 10 of those workers potentially affected by the wage hike are over the age of 20 and 58% of them are women. A report from the Congressional Budget Office released last week predicted a slightly smaller impact, reporting the bill could increase wages for as many as 27 million Americans and potentially lift 1.3 million families out of poverty. Under the Raise the Wage Act, the federal minimum wage increases would roll out on a gradual schedule: $8.40 in 2019

$9.50 in 2020

$10.60 in 2021

$11.70 in 2022

$12.80 in 2023

$13.90 in 2024

$15.00 in 2025 In addition to raising the minimum wage, the legislation would also eliminate the separate minimum wage standard for tipped employees. Currently, employers can pay tipped employees a minimum of $2.13 an hour, as long as their tips push them beyond the $7.25 hourly federal minimum. The Raise the Wage Act would also create an equal minimum wage for Americans with disabilities.

What needs to happen to make $15 minimum a reality

While the House passed the legislation, its implementation is far from a sure thing. Predictive intelligence firm Skopos Labs estimates the Raise the Wage Act has a 24% chance of being enacted. That’s because identical legislation would have to pass the Senate and then be signed into law by President Trump. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), the majority leader, said Thursday he will not be taking up the legislation in the Senate. And Thursday’s House vote was far from bipartisan, with only three Republicans voting to pass it. Many Republicans cited concerns that a $15 federal minimum wage may cause significant job loss. A report from the Congressional Budget Office released last week found that a mandatory $15 minimum wage may eliminate as many as 3.7 million jobs across the U.S. because companies will look to cut costs.

Why advocates say minimum wage needs to increase


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
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Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com


Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates com
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
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Boeing to take $4.9 billion hit in second quarter on 737 Max grounding

Workers stand near Boeing 737 MAX airplanes as they sit parked at a Boeing facility adjacent to King County International Airport, known as Boeing Field, on May 31, 2019 in Seattle, Washington.

Boeing on Thursday said it will take a $4.9 billion charge in the second quarter due to the worldwide grounding of its 737 Max planes after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people.

The charge, which comes to $8.74 a share, is set to wipe out profits. Analysts expected the company to book a per-share profit of $1.80 for the second quarter, according to average estimates compiled by Refinitiv. The charge would reduce revenue and pre-tax earnings by $5.6 billion in the quarter, Boeing said.

The 737 Max jets have been grounded since mid-March and regulators have not said when they expect to allow the planes to fly again.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: leslie josephs phil lebeau, leslie josephs, phil lebeau
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Silicon Valley has found its presidential candidate in Andrew Yang

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supp


Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supp
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, san, workers, product, presidential, yang, andrew, francisco, candidate, silicon, tech, valley


Silicon Valley has found its presidential candidate in Andrew Yang

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks to media outside the Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle | Getty Images

Just before Elon Musk unveiled his latest plan for brain implants in San Francisco Tuesday night, people waiting for the live-stream to begin watched the comment section flood with “Yang Gang” and “Yang 2020!” The terms described Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who was trending on Google Search. The same response was echoed in physical center of the tech world. Approximately 200 Silicon Valley engineers, graphic designers, and product managers crammed into a sold-out, standing room-only discussion at a civic community space called Manny’s in San Francisco’s Mission District Tuesday night. Workers from all different areas within tech gathered to hear Yang deliver dry-humored responses ranging from healthcare to memes. Yang, who is polling around 2% in most polls of Democratic primary voters, has a surprisingly devoted core in the tech community. When he held a rally in March in San Francisco, nearly 3,000 people showed up. He attracts Silicon Valley Democrats, libertarians and even a few conservatives, all of whom have given up on politicians who don’t understand them. Yang connects with them because of his approach to data, his unrehearsed — and sometimes awkward — candor, and a perceived understanding of the moral dilemmas surrounding the tech industry. He also speaks tech’s inside language. On Tuesday night, he had answers to audience questions from childhood trauma to pessimism around automation, and even e-sports. “I feel like I get characterized as an Asian tech bro,” he told the San Francisco crowd Tuesday, which got a large laugh from the crowd. “But I spent the last several years at a nonprofit and that’s very wholesome.”

Presidential candidate Andrew Yang hi-fives supporters in San Francisco. Jennifer Elias | CNBC

“I know everyone in Silicon Valley and I’ve never met you,” said interviewer and Recode founder Kara Swisher. “But you’re the candidate of Silicon Valley.” After Swisher’s interview, Yang asked if the event “the first political thing” they had been to. About one quarter of the people in the room raised their hands. “Most politicians are just responding to culture whereas he is the culture and anticipates the future,” said Joel Scoles, a food and beverage worker who serves tech workers daily in San Francisco.

‘An Asian man who likes math’

Yang appeals to SIlicon Valley tech types in part because of his straightforward and quick-witted responses, which are delivered with with few political embellishments or emotions. For instance, Yang cracked a joke about his parents, who met as graduate students at University California of Berkeley — his brother Lawrence is named after Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science. “We used to joke that’s where our parents got busy,” Yang told Tuesday’s crowd, garnering roaring laughs. Yang supporters often wear hats and shirts with the acronym “MATH,” which Yang said stands for “Make America Think Harder.” Tech workers say this refers to Yang’s habit of answering questions with multiple data points at the drop of a hat. “I’m going to be the alternative to the establishment that grows the whole time,” Yang said about the presidential candidate process. “And I’m the man for that job because the opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math,” he added as the room erupted in laughter and applause. Several “Yang Gang” groups have formed around the San Francisco Bay Area, according to Dylan Enright, finance director for Yang’s campaign. Andrew Barakat, a product manager for a major tech company which he asked us not to name, said he likes Yang because he’s a numbers guy. “We’re in a stage in economic development where people shouldn’t be on the verge of bankruptcy or being in debt all the time,” he said. If you start to measure what actually matters and then incentivize people to pursue those things, you have a real chance at changing the economy.”

Andrew Barakat, a product manager for a FANG company wears Yang gear that stands for “Make America Think Again.” Jennifer Elias | CNBC

Barakat, who has a background in data analytics, economics and behavioral studies, pointed to venture capitalist John Doerr’s book “Measure What Matters,” which dissects the popular tech business concept of measuring objectives and key results. “That system is the backbone of how Silicon Valley has developed its biggest companies — it’s focused on OKRs (objective key results) that are numerical and trackable, and Andrew wants to do the same thing.” “He actually answers questions and when he evaluates an argument, he refers to studies and data,” agreed Ash Hussain, who works as the head of finance for a tech startup in San Francisco that he asked us not to identify.

Free money for everyone

Yang’s platform centers on the concept of universal basic income, and he proposes a “Freedom Dividend” that would allow each U.S. resident to receive $1,000 a month. “What I say is that it’s not socialism. It’s capitalism that doesn’t start at zero,” Yang said. He believes the dividend will build a “trickle up” effect because that money will go right back into the economy. He views the only reason people are resisting it is because we’ve been programmed to assume that there’s a limited amount of resources to go around. “A neuroscientist put it to me best and said, ‘Andrew, you’re going to be fighting the human mind because the human mind is programmed for resource scarcity,” he said Tuesday. The freedom dividend has attracted donations from some of the most well-known tech leaders. That list includes OpenAI CEO and former Y-combinator president Sam Altman who gave $2,700, Google G suite product lead Scott Johnston who gave $2,700, and Gerald Huff, principal software engineer at Tesla who gave $2,000. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes reportedly donated $250 to Yang’s campaign too. Yang also caters to tech workers who face moral dilemmas about their effect on complicated societal issues such as automation and data privacy. “Being in the Bay Area, you know first-hand the impacts of AI: You have peers working on technologies to streamline and make processes more efficient — which effectively automates away millions of jobs,” said Eric Quach, a product lead for a Silicon Valley tech giant, which he asked us not to name. Quach, who said he considers himself a Democrat, volunteered to organize parts of the “Yang Gang.” “I am supporting Andrew Yang because he understands better than any other candidate how technology and artificial intelligence is affecting the workforce of today and tomorrow.” Yang points out flaws of popular workforce retraining solutions touted by both corporations and politicians, which resonates with tech workers. That includes the concept of “turning coal miners into coders,” Yang said Tuesday. “I was just at a truck stop in Iowa, and if I said, ‘Hey, have any interest in a coding career?’ they’d be more likely to punch you in the face.”

Breaking up Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jennifer elias
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GM CEO to United Auto Workers: ‘Our collective future is at stake’

DETROIT — General Motors CEO and Chairman Mary Barra on Tuesday pleaded for United Auto Workers union leaders to assist, not hinder, the company’s ongoing restructuring efforts to better position GM for the future. Barra, speaking during a ceremony to officially begin negotiations with the union, said the company and union need to be “agile, decisive and disciplined” together more than ever amid a “rapidly” changing auto industry. “We will fight to keep these union plants open and allocate more


DETROIT — General Motors CEO and Chairman Mary Barra on Tuesday pleaded for United Auto Workers union leaders to assist, not hinder, the company’s ongoing restructuring efforts to better position GM for the future. Barra, speaking during a ceremony to officially begin negotiations with the union, said the company and union need to be “agile, decisive and disciplined” together more than ever amid a “rapidly” changing auto industry. “We will fight to keep these union plants open and allocate more
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: michael wayland
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GM CEO to United Auto Workers: 'Our collective future is at stake'

DETROIT — General Motors CEO and Chairman Mary Barra on Tuesday pleaded for United Auto Workers union leaders to assist, not hinder, the company’s ongoing restructuring efforts to better position GM for the future.

Barra, speaking during a ceremony to officially begin negotiations with the union, said the company and union need to be “agile, decisive and disciplined” together more than ever amid a “rapidly” changing auto industry.

“Today, we are at a turning point when it comes to the transformation of the industry and this company,” she said during the event inside GM’s global headquarters in Detroit. “Our collective future is at stake. We cannot move forward without one another.”

UAW leaders took a different position, pledging to use contract negotiations this year with GM to fight the company’s plans to potentially close four U.S. plants.

“Speaking on behalf of my brothers and sisters, know this, we will not leave no stone unturned,” UAW President Gary Jones said during the event. “We will fight to keep these union plants open and allocate more products here on American soil. It can be done.”

His comments came as about 80 laid-off workers and supporters from Lordstown Assembly, a plant in Ohio that GM idled in March, picketed outside GM’s headquarters.

Barra did not directly address Lordstown or the other impacted plants in Michigan and Maryland during her remarks. She instead cited a need to be “proactive on all fronts because we are not here merely to survive, we are here to lead it and we are here to win.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: michael wayland
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Amazon workers’ Prime Day strike begins in Minnesota

Shopping with Amazon on Prime Day may mean crossing a digital picket line. Amazon workers in Minnesota and Germany are striking as Prime Day kicks off, in a stand against working conditions and wage practices. But the action in Minnesota is the first major strike of workers in the United States during the company’s annual Prime Day event. This year’s Prime Day could bring in as much as $5.8 billion in sales globally, according to Coresight Research. The strike coincides with Amazon’s Prime Day,


Shopping with Amazon on Prime Day may mean crossing a digital picket line. Amazon workers in Minnesota and Germany are striking as Prime Day kicks off, in a stand against working conditions and wage practices. But the action in Minnesota is the first major strike of workers in the United States during the company’s annual Prime Day event. This year’s Prime Day could bring in as much as $5.8 billion in sales globally, according to Coresight Research. The strike coincides with Amazon’s Prime Day,
Amazon workers’ Prime Day strike begins in Minnesota Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jasmine wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, strike, minnesota, sales, companys, begins, workers, day, amazon, working, prime


Amazon workers' Prime Day strike begins in Minnesota

Shopping with Amazon on Prime Day may mean crossing a digital picket line.

Amazon workers in Minnesota and Germany are striking as Prime Day kicks off, in a stand against working conditions and wage practices. Those in Europe have staged protests during sale days in past years. But the action in Minnesota is the first major strike of workers in the United States during the company’s annual Prime Day event. It may also be a sign that the company’s increase to a $15 minimum wage last year may not be enough to satisfy workers’ needs.

This year’s Prime Day could bring in as much as $5.8 billion in sales globally, according to Coresight Research. Last year, Amazon reported that consumers worldwide purchased more than 100 million products. This is also the first time Amazon is holding the midsummer sales event since it promised to provide one-day shipping on select items to Prime members in June.

The strike is part of the workers’ continued push on Amazon to “provide safe and reliable jobs, increase respect and opportunities for advancement for the predominantly East African workforce, protect the right to organize and advocate for better working conditions, and to demand concrete action from Amazon to address critical issues like climate change,” the organizers said in a statement.

The fulfillment center workers in Shakopee, Minnesota plan to start walking out at 3 p.m. ET Monday for a six-hour period that overlaps with the morning and evening shifts. The strike coincides with Amazon’s Prime Day, which could be one of the company’s biggest sales day of the year. Some Seattle tech employees will also be attending the strike in solidarity, according to a statement from the Amazon Employees for Climate Justice.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jasmine wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, strike, minnesota, sales, companys, begins, workers, day, amazon, working, prime


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United Auto Workers union opens tense labor talks with Ford, GM, Fiat Chrysler

Gary Jones, the newly-elected President of the United Auto Workers (UAW), addresses the 37th UAW Constitutional Convention June14, 2018 at Cobo Center in Detroit, Michigan. DEARBORN, Mich. — Billions of dollars in investments and the viability of the U.S. auto industry are on the line this year as the Big Three Detroit automakers kick off negotiations with the United Auto Workers union with a ceremonial handshake at Ford’s headquarters Monday. EVs, according to the UAW, take less labor to build


Gary Jones, the newly-elected President of the United Auto Workers (UAW), addresses the 37th UAW Constitutional Convention June14, 2018 at Cobo Center in Detroit, Michigan. DEARBORN, Mich. — Billions of dollars in investments and the viability of the U.S. auto industry are on the line this year as the Big Three Detroit automakers kick off negotiations with the United Auto Workers union with a ceremonial handshake at Ford’s headquarters Monday. EVs, according to the UAW, take less labor to build
United Auto Workers union opens tense labor talks with Ford, GM, Fiat Chrysler Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, tense, united, fiat, industry, opens, auto, union, negotiations, gm, president, workers, uaw, mich, expected, ford, talks


United Auto Workers union opens tense labor talks with Ford, GM, Fiat Chrysler

Gary Jones, the newly-elected President of the United Auto Workers (UAW), addresses the 37th UAW Constitutional Convention June14, 2018 at Cobo Center in Detroit, Michigan.

DEARBORN, Mich. — Billions of dollars in investments and the viability of the U.S. auto industry are on the line this year as the Big Three Detroit automakers kick off negotiations with the United Auto Workers union with a ceremonial handshake at Ford’s headquarters Monday.

The talks are expected to be the most contentious in a decade amid “America first” policies from the Trump administration, a tight labor market and thousands of job cuts and cost reductions as the industry prepares for an expected economic downturn.

Adding to the tension is a shift to emerging technologies such as electric and autonomous vehicles. EVs, according to the UAW, take less labor to build and puts an estimated 35,000 or more jobs at risk.

Union leaders said this year’s negotiations will set the wages and benefits for about 158,000 members. The outcome will also help steer investment plans for General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler in the U.S. for the next several years.

“The biggest tool that they’ve got is to strike,” said Kristin Dziczek, vice president of industry, labor and economics at the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. “It wouldn’t be too far of a stretch to say they’re willing to go there.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, labor, tense, united, fiat, industry, opens, auto, union, negotiations, gm, president, workers, uaw, mich, expected, ford, talks


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Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals

Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec. Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of cert


Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec. Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of cert
Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tent, factory, production, harsh, took, employees, meet, model, tesla, say, worked, ga4, shortcuts, work, tape, workers, goals


Tesla employees say they took shortcuts, worked through harsh conditions to meet Model 3 production goals

Robotics arms install the front seats to the Tesla Model 3 at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, on Thursday, July 26, 2018. Mason Trinca | The Washington Post | Getty Images

Current and former Tesla employees working in the company’s open-air “tent” factory say they were pressured to take shortcuts to hit aggressive Model 3 production goals, including making fast fixes to plastic housings with electrical tape, working through harsh conditions and skipping previously required vehicle tests. For instance, four people who worked on the assembly line say they were told by supervisors to use electrical tape to patch cracks on plastic brackets and housings, and provided photographs showing where tape was applied. They and four additional people familiar with conditions there describe working through high heat, cold temperatures at night and smoky air during last year’s wildfires in Northern California. Their disclosures highlight the difficult balance Tesla must strike as it ramps up production while trying to stem costs. Tesla recently told shareholders that in the three months that ended June 30, it made 87,048 vehicles, including 72,531 Model 3s, the company’s lowest-priced sedan. Both were quarterly records. Tesla told shareholders to expect full-year deliveries this year to reach at least 360,000, and more than 250,000 of those are expected to be Model 3s. Last year, Tesla conquered some “production hell” issues, as CEO Elon Musk called them. That included removing or repurposing conveyors and robots that didn’t work as planned, and figuring out how to build cars and battery packs with more manual labor. This year, Tesla has been grappling with what could be described as “logistics hell.” It has had to deliver cars to customers in more points around the world than ever before. Tesla executives have said the company should be profitable in the second half of 2019. A Tesla spokesperson said the anecdotes employees shared about work in the tent are “misleading and do not reflect our manufacturing practices or what it’s like to work at Tesla.” The spokesperson said many of the shortcuts described by employees, such as using electrical tape during assembly, are not approved procedures, and that cars are rigorously inspected before shipping. Tesla also said many of the parts used in the Model 3 come with electrical tape on them from suppliers, and showed CNBC photographs of some factory-taped parts. The company said its first-pass yields at the Fremont, California, plant are higher than ever — a measurement that indicates Tesla is producing good cars and is scrapping or reworking fewer units than it did historically. Regarding working conditions in the tent, Tesla said, “We work hard to create a work environment that is as safe, fair and fun as possible, and it is incredibly important to us that employees look forward to coming to work every day. In fact, we have a large number of employees who request to work on GA4 based on what they hear from colleagues and what they have seen first-hand.”

A tent is seen at the Tesla factory in Fremont, California, U.S. June 22, 2018. Reuters | Stephen Lam

Pressure to produce under the tent

Tesla assembles some of its Model 3s in a tent, known as GA4 ( “general assembly 4”) in Fremont. Built in spring 2018, it was supposed to be a temporary measure. The idea was to run the tent mostly on manual labor while Tesla perfected its automated factory lines indoors in what’s called “the brick.” The tent has now been operating for more than a year. Workers told CNBC that GA4 is now able to produce up to 120 cars per shift, across three shifts per day, amounting to 2,160 Model 3s in a perfect six-day week, or around 30,000 per quarter assuming maximum rates of production. Tesla did not confirm these numbers, but in a statement last year, the company said GA4 was responsible for about 20% of total Model 3 production during a high-output week in July 2018. While the tented line does not crank out the majority of Tesla’s Model 3s, it still adds significant volume. When Model 3 lines inside the Fremont factory go down, workers in the tent can stay productive. That’s important to Tesla, given its history of over-automation and missed targets. In the tent, Model 3s are put together using manual labor and power tools, lifts and conveyors, but not with any of the sophisticated robotics Tesla uses on the indoor assembly lines. Workers say they do one process at their station repeatedly, usually walking along the line with the car until they’re done. Carlos Aranda was a former lead production associate who worked in GA4. Correspondence shared with CNBC shows he resigned from Tesla on June 24, following months of medical leave stemming from injuries he says he sustained on the job. (Tesla claims he was fired for a Twitter post that went against its Workplace Violence Policy, but provided no record of the offending tweet.) His wife, Maggie Aranda, worked as a Model 3 production associate in another part of GA4. She says she was dismissed on June 11 for using her phone during a shift to book health appointments after an injury. Both the Arandas previously worked on indoor assembly lines at the factory. Six current and former employees supported their accounts of work in GA4 but asked to remain unidentified. These people said that while work in GA4 is physically demanding, many people like working there because the atmosphere is good and camaraderie is strong. They said they can listen to music while they work, with a supervisor’s approval, and don’t always have to wear a uniform. At the same time, workers were encouraged to take shortcuts to hit their production goals in the tent, according to five people who work or worked there recently. For example, when it’s cold in the tent, workers tend to break a high number of plastic brackets and housings that hold critical electronics in place inside of the Model 3, according to four of these people. Rather than waiting for replenishment teams to deliver boxes of new plastic parts to their stations in GA4, they said, supervisors told workers to use vinyl electrical tape to make quick fixes. Carlos Aranda says he personally visited Walmart multiple times to buy the tape and other items for production associates. For instance, this photo shows tape applied to a segment of a white plastic housing where it holds “triple cam” connections in place inside of a Model 3. The Arandas said the edge of this plastic housing piece would frequently crack during installation, and tape was often applied here to hold down the resulting, hinge-like flap.

A photograph sent by a Tesla employee showing how electrical tape was used during Model 3 assembly.

Installed in the windshield of a Model 3, a “triple cam” holds three cameras that allow the vehicle to see the road, traffic lights, lane markings and obstacles ahead. If triple cam connections loosen or break, some of Tesla’s safety features — like Sentry mode, AutoPilot, automatic emergency braking or full self-driving — may fail, the Arandas said. The car should then give drivers an alert that AutoPilot is no longer engaged, and the car needs service. Tesla said many of the parts they use in the Model 3 come with electrical tape on them from suppliers, and showed CNBC photographs of some factory-taped parts. Current and former GA4 workers acknowledged this, too. However, they made a distinction — the GA4 workers use tape to fix housings or brackets with cracks or to stop parts from vibrating in the car if they aren’t snapped or fastened in perfectly. That’s not the same as “factory tape,” they said. Factory tape is high-quality and looks as if it’s shrink-wrapped on a part, always in the same place. Much of it is wound carefully around bundles of cables and wires in a perfect spiral. The tape that workers would apply in a Model 3 typically has hastily cut or torn ends and varies in placement. A Tesla spokesperson says the company hasn’t found evidence of electrical tape being used to make quick fixes in GA4, and would never officially condone or encourage it. The company also emphasized that its cars go through rigorous quality inspections before they leave the factory. A former Tesla technician, who worked in the tent on Model 3s and asked to remain unidentified, analyzed photos from GA4 that were shared with CNBC by current and former employees. This person said Tesla’s vehicle engineers would probably not appreciate that Model 3s were being assembled with this cheap vinyl electrical tape, and any processes allowing prodigious use of the tape during assembly should be reevaluated. The technician also emphasized that the Tesla Model 3 is an ideal electric vehicle — as long as it’s built exactly to spec.

Other short cuts

Workers say they took other short cuts to hit aggressive new production targets, too. Five people who work or worked in the tent in 2019 said they would frequently pass cars down the line that they knew were missing a few bolts, nuts or lugs, all in the name of saving time. In the tent, most workers have just a couple of minutes to complete a process. If a small item was missing, or a bolt was not torqued in perfectly, they would rather keep cars moving than stop the line and be seen as a bottleneck to production, they said. In particular, these people said, aeroshields are often missing a middle bolt, and loose connections in body controllers are a common issue. For example, this photo shows the power supply for a distribution block in the front right vehicle controller in a Model 3. A nut is missing that should be there to secure electrical connections.

Tesla workers said they sometimes skipped installation of certain bolts, nuts or lugs in a rush to hit their Model 3 production goals.

Wires in this part of the car go to the touchscreen, car computer, door latches and window regulators on the right hand side of the Model 3, while the red cable distributes power into the systems on the right hand side. Although it’s a low-voltage connection, if it’s not properly secured, it can heat up and cause problems, the former Tesla technician said. Model 3s with loose connections can be hard to detect during inspections, the ex-technician and factory workers said. Tesla said the company “has a robust quality assurance team that reviews each vehicle at the end of the GA4 assembly line to ensure every car was built correctly and is perfect before it leaves our factory to go to customers.” Current and former employees also said Tesla reduced “water testing” on cars as the company began ramping up production of Model 3s. In a water test, a vehicle goes into a booth where jets blast it with water from all different directions. Any leaks in the seals are immediately found and fixed. The tests take about 10 minutes each. In late 2018, Tesla changed its policy and now only conducts sample testing for water leaks on Model 3s. Since then, if workers see an issue with the urethane seals around a Model 3 glass roof, for example, they can request a water test. But many in GA4 are hesitant to make that request because of time pressure and a lack of experience or training that they need to identify flaws, a current associate said. A Tesla spokesperson said the company is not aware of any instances where workers were told not to do water testing because that may slow production. The company says it encourages employees to identify opportunities for improvement, and engage all appropriate teams to evaluate potential risks and identify possible solutions. In addition, six current and prior employees said, workers often violated a rule that cars should only be driven in “factory mode,” which now limits speed to 10 mph. Workers would sneak freshly built Model 3s out of factory mode to zip them over to a camera calibration station (or “cam cal”), which was located far away from the GA4 tent. (That station has since been moved closer to the tent.) Employees caught doing this would be appropriately disciplined, Tesla said. Mike Ramsey, senior automotive research director at Gartner, said that even before Tesla put a Model 3 assembly line in a tent, it had a “ship-it-now, fix-it-later” mentality inspired by software patching. Tesla’s focus, instead, has been to exceed expectations in other areas like brand, vehicle acceleration or charging, he said. While Tesla has been successful with those efforts, he said: “Every time a car rolls off the lot and a piece of trim falls off, or an electrical system is failing after a month, it undermines the brand. That customer is not likely to buy another Tesla.” Ramsey also said, “The idea that you would not stop the line, and would patch something with spit and bailing wire — OK, not literally that, but close to it — almost certainly injects quality issues down the road that they are going to have to fix.”

Exposed to the elements

Exposure to the elements in GA4 poses another problem for the workers. Six current and recent Tesla employees said GA4 workers have repeatedly asked Tesla’s environmental health and safety teams to help with cold temperatures overnight, sweltering heat during the days, and pests — including mice and bugs — in the tent. They say workers commonly deal with heat rash and heat exhaustion. Tesla installed big fans in GA4 to distribute heat and circulate air. However they are not on consistently, these people said, and usually don’t make a big difference. Tesla said its environmental health and safety team monitors temperatures to ensure they are within a comfortable range for the safety of employees, production equipment and car parts. They also said they provide temperature controls like cool fans, hydration, rest breaks and heat stress awareness training to employees. Hot, dry conditions can also lead to problems with air quality. Correspondence reviewed by CNBC shows that Tesla required GA4 workers to report for duty even as wildfire smoke floated up from the massive Camp Fire that devastated Northern California in November. On Nov. 9, the day after the Camp Fire ignited, the AirNow Air Quality Index rated Fremont at an “unhealthy” 165, and continued in the unhealthy range for at least another week. Tesla did not proactively distribute respirator masks to GA4 workers in the first few days after the Camp Fire began. Workers had to request the masks, according to internal correspondence shared with CNBC. Inside the building portion of the factory they had HVAC and good air flow, but tent workers were stuck, said Maggie Aranda, and they did not get time off due to the smoke. Tesla says it offered air filter masks who those who wanted them and provided face masks every day as a precautionary measure. When conditions turn cold and wet, other problems arise. For instance, this photo shows rain seeping into the tented roof at GA4.

Rain seeps through a tent above Tesla’s GA4 Model 3 assembly line in Fremont, Calif.

Employees wear layers, and big coats that can impede their movement. Supervisors distribute disposable hand-warming packets that workers slip into their gloves or tape to their bodies. Tesla provided big red jackets for GA4 workers last year, but stopped distributing them by early 2019, according to several current and former employees. On cold nights early this year, workers in a tented “paint hospital” sometimes used heat lamps, which are used to dry paint and clear coat on cars, to warm their own bodies, according to current and former production associates. This paint hospital has since been moved indoors, according to public records with the city of Fremont. At a GA4 station where employees checked Model 3 vehicle alignment, Carlos Aranda said, workers used space heaters in late 2018. But when it rained, water seeping into the tent from above and below made these a hazard, he said. He shared photos of a leaking roof and space heater there, plugged in, with rain puddling nearby. Tesla says using space heaters is against company policy.

Tesla workers build cars in a tented assembly line called “GA4” where they are exposed to the elements, including big temperature swings and rain.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tent, factory, production, harsh, took, employees, meet, model, tesla, say, worked, ga4, shortcuts, work, tape, workers, goals


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Workers value a strong company culture over higher pay, study claims

Most people believe a strong company culture will make them happier at work than earning a high salary, according to new research. Although corporate culture was a priority for the majority of respondents, it mattered more to younger adults, Glassdoor’s findings showed. Two-thirds of British millennials ⁠— those aged between 18 and 34 ⁠—⁠ ranked culture above salary, while half of U.K. workers aged over 45 prioritized culture first. In the U.S., 65% of millennials valued company culture more tha


Most people believe a strong company culture will make them happier at work than earning a high salary, according to new research. Although corporate culture was a priority for the majority of respondents, it mattered more to younger adults, Glassdoor’s findings showed. Two-thirds of British millennials ⁠— those aged between 18 and 34 ⁠—⁠ ranked culture above salary, while half of U.K. workers aged over 45 prioritized culture first. In the U.S., 65% of millennials valued company culture more tha
Workers value a strong company culture over higher pay, study claims Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, culture, uk, higher, workers, value, salary, adults, strong, company, pay, job, values, glassdoors, study, claims


Workers value a strong company culture over higher pay, study claims

Most people believe a strong company culture will make them happier at work than earning a high salary, according to new research.

Global jobs website Glassdoor surveyed more than 5,000 adults in the U.S., the U.K., France and Germany throughout June to determine their priorities when it came to job satisfaction.

According to the study, 56% of workers ranked a strong workplace culture as more important than salary, with more than three-in-four workers saying they’d consider a company’s culture before applying for a job there.

Although corporate culture was a priority for the majority of respondents, it mattered more to younger adults, Glassdoor’s findings showed.

Two-thirds of British millennials ⁠— those aged between 18 and 34 ⁠—⁠ ranked culture above salary, while half of U.K. workers aged over 45 prioritized culture first. In the U.S., 65% of millennials valued company culture more than a high income, compared to 52% of Americans over the age of 45.

When considering a new job, the vast majority of workers would also take an organization’s values into account ⁠— 73% of Glassdoor’s respondents would not apply to a company unless its values aligned with their own.

Meanwhile, two-thirds of employees said their firm’s culture was one of the main reasons for staying in their job. Just over 70% of adults from all four countries said they would look for a role elsewhere if their current company’s culture deteriorated, with that proportion rising to 74% among U.S. workers.

“A common misperception among many employers today is that pay and work-life balance are among the top factors driving employee satisfaction,” said Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s chief economist, in a press release Thursday.

“Instead, employers looking to boost recruiting and retention efforts should prioritize building strong company culture and value systems, amplifying the quality and visibility of their senior leadership teams and offering clear, exciting career opportunities to employees.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, culture, uk, higher, workers, value, salary, adults, strong, company, pay, job, values, glassdoors, study, claims


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