42% of American workers say they have fought about politics at work—and you can expect it to continue

For years, workers have been told to keep politics out of the workplace, but these days that can seem unavoidable. According to a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management, 42% of U.S. employees say they have personally experienced, and 44% say they have witnessed, political disagreements at work. Roughly 34% of respondents told SHRM that their workplace is not inclusive of differing political perspectives, and 12% said they have personally experienced political affiliation bi


For years, workers have been told to keep politics out of the workplace, but these days that can seem unavoidable.
According to a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management, 42% of U.S. employees say they have personally experienced, and 44% say they have witnessed, political disagreements at work.
Roughly 34% of respondents told SHRM that their workplace is not inclusive of differing political perspectives, and 12% said they have personally experienced political affiliation bi
42% of American workers say they have fought about politics at work—and you can expect it to continue Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, continue, say, help, employees, fought, workers, work, politics, expect, american, workplace, inclusive, companies, told, workand


42% of American workers say they have fought about politics at work—and you can expect it to continue

For years, workers have been told to keep politics out of the workplace, but these days that can seem unavoidable. According to a recent survey from the Society for Human Resource Management, 42% of U.S. employees say they have personally experienced, and 44% say they have witnessed, political disagreements at work. Roughly 34% of respondents told SHRM that their workplace is not inclusive of differing political perspectives, and 12% said they have personally experienced political affiliation bias. A majority (56%) said that discussing politics at work has become more common in the past four years. “One year out from the 2020 election, we should expect to see political disagreements increase even further in the coming months,” said Johnny Taylor, SHRM president and CEO, in a statement. “Companies can’t, and shouldn’t try to, quash these conversations because — contrary to popular belief — they’re already happening. But what they can do is create inclusive cultures of civility where difference isn’t a disruption.”

Gary Waters | Getty Images

The trend isn’t just happening among workers; employers are also becoming more politically vocal. “Companies need to be proactive, not reactive. We’re talking about hot-button issues that fire people up, so it’s important to put up ‘guardrails’ when facilitating constructive, inclusive environments where employees can disagree without being disagreeable,” said Taylor. Experts agree that setting guidelines, such as agreeing to give all coworkers time to speak, can help promote healthy conversations at work.

Companies also feel pressure to take sides

Glassdoor said increased politicism among corporations is one of the biggest trends of 2020, as a part of its newly released Jobs and Hiring Trends for 2020 report. “Traditionally, companies have tried to be neutral politically for really obvious reasons,” Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor tells CNBC Make It. “But the political climate in the U.S. is so contentious, so divided. There’s a new scandal in the headlines every day, and it’s taking over watercooler conversations at work. It’s also putting CEOs under pressure to react in that environment.” Chamberlain says the politicized climate is creating opportunities for companies to speak up. Taking a stand on “social issues that are closely linked to their mission and values can help organizations with talent attraction in a tight labor market, and it can be a win for them in terms of a company culture,” he says, pointing to Patagonia’s advocacy for environmental sustainability and Dick’s Sporting Goods’s stance on gun sales. But while large corporations and high-ranking CEOs may have some space to take political stances, Chamberlain maintains that individual employees should exercise caution when talking about politics at work. “Individual employees need to be extremely careful,” he says, suggesting that workers find groups of like-minded coworkers and organize volunteering efforts. “Volunteering for a specific cause like homelessness, or whatever it may be, that’s a way that people can safely express their political opinions in the workplace and help build team morale and culture at the same time. But I definitely think going it alone without being part of a larger group at a company is risky.” To be sure, political speech can get you lawfully fired. “Private employers can fire you at will,” Lata Nott, executive director of the First Amendment Center, told CNBC Make It. However, according to Nott, the company’s reasoning for firing an employee cannot infringe on their civil rights. “Title VII protects your age, national origin, race, ethnic background, gender, religious beliefs and pregnancy status from discrimination, but it does not explicitly protect political speech at work.”

What employees should keep in mind


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, continue, say, help, employees, fought, workers, work, politics, expect, american, workplace, inclusive, companies, told, workand


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Baby boomers will be the fastest-growing generation in the workforce next year, Glassdoor claims

Baby Boomers — the generation comprised of those over the age of 65 — will be the fastest-growing age category in the U.S. and U.K. workforces next year, according to a new report. Meanwhile, the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics expects Britain’s over-65 workforce to grow by 20% in the decade to 2024. “Science is making longer lives possible – and as people live longer, they are continuing to learn, to be productive and to contribute to society. However, Glassdoor flagged that few employers


Baby Boomers — the generation comprised of those over the age of 65 — will be the fastest-growing age category in the U.S. and U.K. workforces next year, according to a new report.
Meanwhile, the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics expects Britain’s over-65 workforce to grow by 20% in the decade to 2024.
“Science is making longer lives possible – and as people live longer, they are continuing to learn, to be productive and to contribute to society.
However, Glassdoor flagged that few employers
Baby boomers will be the fastest-growing generation in the workforce next year, Glassdoor claims Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lives, workers, report, baby, expected, generation, workforce, age, glassdoor, work, longer, claims, boomers, fastestgrowing


Baby boomers will be the fastest-growing generation in the workforce next year, Glassdoor claims

Baby Boomers — the generation comprised of those over the age of 65 — will be the fastest-growing age category in the U.S. and U.K. workforces next year, according to a new report.

Published Tuesday, Glassdoor’s “Job and Hiring Trends for 2020” report outlined the global jobs site’s expectations for the job market in the year ahead, with a key trend expected to be a “gray wave” of senior citizens impacting the workforce.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), almost 20% of Americans over the age of 65 were employed or actively looking for work last year, up from less than 12% two decades earlier.

“Labor force participation rate is expected to increase fastest for the oldest segments of the population — most notably, people aged 65 to 74 and 75 and older—through 2024,” the BLS said in 2017. “In contrast, participation rates for most other age groups in the labor force aren’t projected to change much over the 2014–24 decade.”

Meanwhile, the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics expects Britain’s over-65 workforce to grow by 20% in the decade to 2024. In 2016, the ONS predicted England’s over-65 workforce would see an increase of almost 60% within 25 years.

Earlier this year, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published an article that outlined some of the reasons the global workforce was ageing.

“Science is making longer lives possible – and as people live longer, they are continuing to learn, to be productive and to contribute to society. For many people, that means continuing to work,” the WEF said.

“Today, a key part of extended middle age is the freedom to work. More and more, people want to keep working past traditional retirement age because they want to continue to contribute to society and find meaning in their own lives – and work does that for them.”

Additionally, Glassdoor noted that as the population aged, pensions may not be sufficient to support people throughout their longer lives, giving some no choice but to return to work. The over-65s “aren’t going anywhere,” the report said, noting that boomers are healthier than past generations and more in need of retirement income than their predecessors.

However, Glassdoor flagged that few employers were tapping into the growing baby boomer talent pool, with most recruitment drives focused on tech-savvy generation Z and millennial workers.

“In 2020 and beyond, we expect to see a dramatic shift in recruiting focus, with more strategies aimed at attracting the booming 65+ workforce and using it to companies’ strategic advantage,” Glassdoor Chief Economist Andrew Chamberlain said in the report.

Benefits of employing experienced older workers included their “rich institutional knowledge” and professional contacts that can be difficult to find among younger talent, the report said.

Disputing a widely-held belief that younger workers were “more knowledge-nimble and tech-oriented,” Glassdoor said baby boomers were just as open to upskilling.

“The best way to prepare both seasoned workers and newer generations in the coming decade is through investments in learning and development,” Chamberlain said.

Last year, a survey of 570 British HR professionals by the U.K.’s Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found more than half of employers expected to alter their recruitment and selection policies over the next five years to adapt to the ageing workforce.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lives, workers, report, baby, expected, generation, workforce, age, glassdoor, work, longer, claims, boomers, fastestgrowing


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The 10 cities hit the hardest by student debt

“Having some student loan debt is not necessarily a terrible thing.” But in cities with weak wages and high debt totals, student loans can have a negative impact on the lives of workers and on local economies. SmartAsset weighed several local variables, including the average amount of student loan debt, median earnings for bachelor’s degree holders and the unemployment rate for bachelor’s degree holders. They found that while student loan debt is a national problem, specific cities are getting h


“Having some student loan debt is not necessarily a terrible thing.”
But in cities with weak wages and high debt totals, student loans can have a negative impact on the lives of workers and on local economies.
SmartAsset weighed several local variables, including the average amount of student loan debt, median earnings for bachelor’s degree holders and the unemployment rate for bachelor’s degree holders.
They found that while student loan debt is a national problem, specific cities are getting h
The 10 cities hit the hardest by student debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, smartasset, hit, hardest, loans, lives, student, local, debt, cities, degree, loan


The 10 cities hit the hardest by student debt

Student loans have the potential to change lives for the better.

Student loans can help people finance a college degree, which remains a key part of accessing high-paying jobs and preparing for the economy of tomorrow. Employment data shows earning a college degree from a reputable institution in a high-paying field continues to be one of the most concrete steps workers can take toward financial and professional stability.

Taking on student debt “can be an investment in your future, and it can be something that can help you to advance in your career,” AJ Smith, vice president of financial education at SmartAsset tells CNBC Make It. “Having some student loan debt is not necessarily a terrible thing.”

But in cities with weak wages and high debt totals, student loans can have a negative impact on the lives of workers and on local economies.

SmartAsset recently analyzed data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, Experian and the IRS across 100 metro areas to determine which cities are the most negatively impacted by student debt. SmartAsset weighed several local variables, including the average amount of student loan debt, median earnings for bachelor’s degree holders and the unemployment rate for bachelor’s degree holders.

They found that while student loan debt is a national problem, specific cities are getting hit the hardest.

Here are the 10 cities most impacted by student debt, according to SmartAsset.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, smartasset, hit, hardest, loans, lives, student, local, debt, cities, degree, loan


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66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here’s where they’d go

Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey. Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%). Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention. As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is


Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey.
Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%).
Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention.
As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is
66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here’s where they’d go Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobheres, theyd, countries, survey, randstad, salary, balance, betterpaying, work, chavez, worklife, workers, abroad


66% of US workers would move abroad for a better-paying job—here's where they'd go

The opportunity to move abroad for work doesn’t present itself every day, but for the majority of Americans, they’d take it if it meant earning more money.

The latest Randstad Workmonitor Mobility Index found 66% of U.S. workers would move abroad for a substantially higher salary, a share that slightly edges out the 59% of workers around the world outside the U.S. who’d do the same. (The survey doesn’t define what constitutes a “substantially higher salary” in its questioning.)

Higher pay would be the biggest motivator for Americans to work abroad, according to the survey. Slightly fewer U.S. workers would emigrate if it meant improving their work-life balance in a different country (64%) or to search for a more meaningful career (58%). And just about half would leave the country if moving abroad was the only way to hold onto their current job.

Jodi Chavez is group president for professional staffing at Randstad U.S. She tells CNBC Make It that these findings could indicate the need for U.S. companies to get more competitive with pay and benefits.

“Part of what this says is, while the talent shortage is very much alive in the U.S., workers have not seen the increase in salary they would like to see, and they are willing to move abroad to work globally and also improve their overall wellbeing,” she says.

Workers who move abroad for stronger earning power might be onto something. HSBC’s latest expat survey showed the average 18 to 34-year-old’s salary rose 35% after relocating overseas, from $40,358 to $54,484. In some markets, earning potential rose by as much as 51%.

American workers most want to work in the U.K., Canada and Australia, the survey finds. A lack of language barrier is one reason why, and Chavez says U.S. workers may be more likely to have family members in these countries to provide the beginnings of a social safety net in a new environment.

The potential for better work-life balance is also a major draw.

“Some other countries have strict work-life balance policies that tend to favor employees,” Chavez says. Most full-time workers in the U.K. are entitled to 28 days of paid holiday leave, for example, and the Canadian government provides employment policies and benefits for parental leave and caregiving leave.

“What U.S. employers can do is to learn from some of these other countries and figure out the best way to still be highly productive and successful, but also incorporate some of those desired work-life balanced schedules that are attractive to today’s U.S. workforce,” Chavez says.

However, employers may take comfort in knowing the U.S. is the No. 1 choice for people around the world to move to for work, if given the opportunity. Randstad’s survey found 28% of international employees want to work in the U.S. most, above Germany (25%) and Australia (22%).

While global workers might not find as many policies that enable better work-life balance, they’re often drawn to the potential for higher pay and opportunities for innovation, Chavez says. She points to the number of growing companies, especially within tech, that may be attractive to non-U.S. workers who can help bridge the skills gap and contribute to new products and ideas.

Companies with global offices may want to offer workers more opportunities to transfer abroad, Chavez suggests, which could improve employee recruitment and retention.

This kind of flexibility could also increase job satisfaction. A recent MetLife survey found more expat workers were happy with their jobs compared with those who stay local.

As the Randstad survey suggests, the appetite for working abroad is there. Advances in technology that enable global connectivity and raise visibility of life abroad plays a huge part, and Chavez says workers are jumping at the possibilities.

“It’s a fascinating place to be,” she says. “Millennials and gen Z are interested in expanding beyond what’s in front of them — their city, their country — and the ability to think beyond borders in a career and life perspective is an exciting opportunity.”

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Don’t miss: These are the best countries to move to if you want to work abroad


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-09  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jobheres, theyd, countries, survey, randstad, salary, balance, betterpaying, work, chavez, worklife, workers, abroad


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Bernie Sanders wants to revamp trade deals, labor protections as part of sweeping immigration plan

Sen. Bernie Sanders would revamp North American trade relationships and expand protections for workers as part of a sweeping new immigration plan. The senator’s proposal ties trade and labor rights to immigration at a time when trade stands at the top of Trump’s economic agenda. Sanders also says his signature universal health-care plan, “Medicare for All,” would “provide comprehensive care to everyone in America,” regardless of immigration status. Democrats seeking the presidential nomination h


Sen. Bernie Sanders would revamp North American trade relationships and expand protections for workers as part of a sweeping new immigration plan.
The senator’s proposal ties trade and labor rights to immigration at a time when trade stands at the top of Trump’s economic agenda.
Sanders also says his signature universal health-care plan, “Medicare for All,” would “provide comprehensive care to everyone in America,” regardless of immigration status.
Democrats seeking the presidential nomination h
Bernie Sanders wants to revamp trade deals, labor protections as part of sweeping immigration plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revamp, border, labor, presidential, deals, workers, trumps, wants, immigration, sanders, senator, migrants, sweeping, trump, protections, plan, trade


Bernie Sanders wants to revamp trade deals, labor protections as part of sweeping immigration plan

Sen. Bernie Sanders would revamp North American trade relationships and expand protections for workers as part of a sweeping new immigration plan.

The 2020 Democratic presidential candidate’s proposal released Thursday morning digs into more detail about the immigration planks he has outlined while competing with 16 rivals to face President Donald Trump. The Vermont senator said he would seek to expand protections for young undocumented migrants and their parents, temporarily halt deportations, decriminalize border crossings and “break up” the Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection agencies, among a bevy of other measures.

The senator’s proposal ties trade and labor rights to immigration at a time when trade stands at the top of Trump’s economic agenda. The president aims to swiftly push his replacement of the North American Free Trade Agreement through Congress as Democrats express concerns that it will not do enough to protect workers, both in the U.S. and Mexico.

Sanders’ plan sets out sprawling goals on an issue that has repeatedly proven intractable in Congress. Here are some of the key points of the senator’s immigration proposal:

Sanders said he would “negotiate trade deals that strengthen, not undermine, the rights of workers in the United States and abroad, and oppose any new agreement that do not meet adequate labor standards.” While the plan does not specifically say he would toss out Trump’s United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, he has opposed the deal as it currently stands, saying it will not go far enough to protect workers.

The senator would also start a program to accept at least 50,000 migrants displaced by climate change during his first year in office.

Sanders also says his signature universal health-care plan, “Medicare for All,” would “provide comprehensive care to everyone in America,” regardless of immigration status.

Sanders aims to set up what his campaign calls a “whistleblower visa” to encourage immigrant workers to speak out against exploitative behavior by employers without fear of blowback or deportation. He would also seek to end workplace raids targeting undocumented workers. In addition, the senator would push to boost protections and bargaining power for farm and domestic workers, including by requiring a $15 per hour minimum wage, regardless of immigration status.

He would use executive authority to push through several policies immediately after taking office. It would include a moratorium on deportations, ending construction of Trump’s border wall and the restriction on travel from several majority Muslim countries to the U.S., reuniting separated children and parents, and stopping the use of for-profit detention facilities.

Sanders wants to expand upon Obama-era programs to protect migrants from deportation. He would give legal status to the 1.8 million young migrants eligible for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era policy that Trump has pushed to end. DACA allows certain people brought to the U.S. illegally as children to be shielded from deportation for two years and allows them to work or get an education in the U.S. The Vermont senator would also aim to extend protections for parents of certain migrants.

The presidential candidate would push Congress to pass a law establishing a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants.

Sanders would put unauthorized border crossings in the same category as overstaying a work visa, making it a civil rather than criminal violation.

He would aim to expand immigration courts and make temporary shelter for migrants more humane. Sanders would also create a $14 billion federal grant program for legal defense for the needy immigrants.

Seizing on a liberal priority, the presidential candidate would scrap ICE and CBP. Deportation and border enforcement functions would go to the Department of Justice, customs would fall to the Treasury Department and naturalization and citizenship would go to the State Department.

With the policy, Sanders wants to show a direct contrast from Trump, whom the senator accused of carrying out “horrific” policies such as the separation of migrant children from families and travel restrictions on people from several Muslim-majority countries. In a primary where Democrats have taken care to cast themselves as best equipped to handle labor issues, Sanders also proposed far-reaching measures to boost undocumented workers in the U.S.

“My father came to America as a refugee without a nickel in his pocket, to escape widespread anti-Semitism and find a better life,” Sanders said in a statement from his campaign. “As the proud son of an immigrant, I know that my father’s story is the story of so many Americans today. When I am in the White House we will stop the hatred towards our immigrant brothers and sisters, end family separation, and locking children up in cages.”

Democrats seeking the presidential nomination have lambasted Trump’s immigration policy, characterizing it as unnecessarily cruel. Trump won the White House in 2016 boosted by nativist rhetoric, promising to crack down on illegal immigration and build a wall on the entire U.S.-Mexico border (paid for by America’s southern neighbor).

But voters have increasingly given Trump poor marks on how he has handled immigration, particularly after backlash to his administration’s separation of migrant families last year.

While Democrats have uniformly blasted Trump’s policies, they have not agreed entirely on how to improve them. For instance, while leading candidates on the field’s left flank such as Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., want to repeal criminal penalties for border apprehensions, former Vice President Joe Biden does not want to take the same step.

Since he jumped into the presidential race earlier this year, Sanders has ranked among voters’ top choices for the Democratic nomination. He has promised sweeping structural change to hold corporations and the wealthy more accountable.

He stands in third place in an average of recent national Democratic primary polls, according to RealClearPolitics.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, revamp, border, labor, presidential, deals, workers, trumps, wants, immigration, sanders, senator, migrants, sweeping, trump, protections, plan, trade


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Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it’s not always the perk they want most

A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings. In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform. Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders. Beyond pay,


A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings.
In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform.
Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders.
Beyond pay,
Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it’s not always the perk they want most Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, recruitment, pay, workers, software, high, tech, position, blumberg, work, nearly, offer, negotiate, perk


Tech workers are in the position to negotiate for high pay, but it's not always the perk they want most

There are nearly 1 million open tech jobs in the U.S., and they’re lucrative.

A 2019 report from iCIMS, a recruitment software provider, says app software developers are the most sought-after tech workers, making up nearly one-third of all tech openings. Workers in this role earn a mean annual salary of $108,080, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

In some of the most competitive markets for tech, software engineers of varying specialties easily earn upwards of $150,000, according to data from Hired, a tech recruitment platform.

But earning power goes far beyond paycheck in the current job market. Rishon Blumberg is co-founder of 10x Ascend, a company that negotiates compensation packages on behalf of senior tech leaders. The biggest trend he’s seen in today’s tech talent shortage is companies realizing the need to meet workers where they are in offering not just competitive pay, but an overall employment package.

In other words, work-life balance is big.

“We’re beginning to see a lot more of an understanding of work-life balance being more important than salary,” Blumberg tells CNBC Make It. He says he’s helped clients successfully negotiate for a flexible work space or schedule arrangement, sometimes with the trade-off of a slightly lower salary.

But it turns out a company’s mission may be the most alluring perk of all.

“Most frequently, we’re seeing people taking a lower offer if the project they get to work on aligns more with their own goals,” Blumberg adds. He cites a recent client who was considering taking a job with Facebook that paid more, but ended up going with a different major company that would allow the client to work on initiatives they felt were more in line with their interests. Blumberg describes the pay cut as “not insignificant.”

Companies would do well to invest in developing their employer brand, both in personalizing recruitment efforts and offering competitive, negotiable compensation packages up front. And considering workers want to join a company whose values they believe in, employers may want to maintain a high standard of conducting business, representing themselves and adding value with their products, Blumberg says.

After all, Hired’s 2019 Global Brand Health Report found nearly half of tech workers said they wouldn’t accept an offer if they weren’t interested in the product, and 43% would turn down an offer if the company had a poor reputation. Beyond pay, tech workers prioritized a company’s culture and opportunities to learn.

Of course, adjustments to these values would benefit workers far beyond the tech sector, and job-seekers in all kinds of markets stand to benefit.

Ana Recio, Salesforce’s executive vice president of global recruiting, tells CNBC Make It that especially given the current labor market, it’s in a company’s best interest to adopt the high standards of their current — and potential — employees.

“It’s a candidate’s market, so employees now have greater individual bargaining power,” she says, “and the corporations that will succeed in the coming years will think about stakeholders, not shareholders.”

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Don’t miss: This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, recruitment, pay, workers, software, high, tech, position, blumberg, work, nearly, offer, negotiate, perk


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The ‘legendary’ Toyota Land Cruiser barely sells in the US, but is still a hit around the world

Toyota sells little more than 3,000 Land Cruiser’s a year in the U.S., compared with more than 40,000 in Australia, its biggest market. The Land Cruiser was the sole vehicle Toyota sold for awhile in the U.S. in the early 1960s, while the company worked out issues on its new export sedan. But now, at a time when sport utility vehicles are at their most popular in history, the Land Cruiser is an overlooked product. Toyota also has not updated the Land Cruiser in years, and spends little-to-no mon


Toyota sells little more than 3,000 Land Cruiser’s a year in the U.S., compared with more than 40,000 in Australia, its biggest market.
The Land Cruiser was the sole vehicle Toyota sold for awhile in the U.S. in the early 1960s, while the company worked out issues on its new export sedan.
But now, at a time when sport utility vehicles are at their most popular in history, the Land Cruiser is an overlooked product.
Toyota also has not updated the Land Cruiser in years, and spends little-to-no mon
The ‘legendary’ Toyota Land Cruiser barely sells in the US, but is still a hit around the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legendary, land, world, sells, cruiser, luxury, barely, highend, vehicle, toyota, workers, hit, united


The 'legendary' Toyota Land Cruiser barely sells in the US, but is still a hit around the world

The Toyota Land Cruiser is often said to be a living legend in much of the automotive world — appreciated by off-roaders, workers in rough rural areas and a favored vehicle of United Nations and NATO forces.

But it seems to barely sell in the United States.

Toyota sells little more than 3,000 Land Cruiser’s a year in the U.S., compared with more than 40,000 in Australia, its biggest market.

That is remarkable for what has been Toyota’s longest-running product in the United States. The Land Cruiser was the sole vehicle Toyota sold for awhile in the U.S. in the early 1960s, while the company worked out issues on its new export sedan.

But now, at a time when sport utility vehicles are at their most popular in history, the Land Cruiser is an overlooked product.

Part of the trouble is competition, which has grown fierce in the high-end luxury SUV segment, where the Land Cruiser sits with its starting price of more than $85,000. Buyers can choose from high-end SUVs made by Land Rover, Mercedes, and Porsche. Toyota even sells the Lexus LX, a luxury full-size that shares many of the capabilities and basic underpinnings with the Land Cruiser, for not much more money.

Toyota also has not updated the Land Cruiser in years, and spends little-to-no money marketing it in the U.S.

At least one report said Toyota may pull the Land Cruiser from the U.S. after 2022. Most recently, MotorTrend’s Jonny Lieberman reported in an Instagram post that he heard of the plan to cancel the Land Cruiser in the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: robert ferris
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, legendary, land, world, sells, cruiser, luxury, barely, highend, vehicle, toyota, workers, hit, united


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These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here’s how much they pay

In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced. A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles. Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show. A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions. These are the industries having


In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced.
A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles.
Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show.
A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions.
These are the industries having
These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here’s how much they pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, open, median, workers, highest, jobs, teachers, share, salary, health, care, industries, jobsheres, pay


These industries have the highest share of open jobs—here's how much they pay

According to Labor Department figures, 5.8 million people looked for work in October and had their pick among 7.02 million job vacancies.

In certain industries, the number of open jobs is especially pronounced.

A recent analysis from Indeed uses Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the industries having the hardest time filling open roles. In the report, the jobs site calculates how many hires were made for every 100 job openings in a given sector, averaged over April, May and June of this year.

Fields feeling the biggest crunch are education and health care, the results show. Within these areas, just over half, or 53, of every 100 positions were filled in a month’s time.

Though very different lines of work, both educators and health-care professionals often face long hours and demanding work conditions.

BLS data finds school teachers earn a median annual salary around $58,000 to $60,000, compared with the national median wage of $38,646 per year. However, median stats can paint a broad picture: The bottom 10% of teachers, on the other hand, earn less than $40,000 annually. Issues of low pay, long hours, overcrowded classrooms and stretched resources fueled the latest teachers’ strike in Chicago, which is just one example of the financial challenges teachers across the United States face.

Health-care workers may be in tight demand given the highly specialized training the field requires. Sometimes, this translates to generous paychecks: Physicians, pharmacists and dentists are some of the highest-paid jobs in the U.S. High pay could mean professionals within this space are happy with their compensation and aren’t looking to change jobs, leaving open roles to sit vacant.

In other cases, however, as with home health or personal care aides, round-the-clock schedules are met with median annual wages around $24,000 despite a surge in demand. Home health care has grown by 150% to nearly 2.3 million workers in the past 10 years, according to The New York Times. A shortage of health care workers could continue to worsen as the share of the aging baby boomer population grows, while health care workers also retire out of their professions.

Other industries with high shares of vacancies include financial services, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing.

These types of jobs tend to require less specialization and may command a lower salary. However, Indeed economist Nick Bunker tells CNBC Make It that the research shows employers may have an easier time filling open roles if they raised wages. Even if salary is capped within a certain role, the report suggests companies may want to offer other benefits — professional development courses, investment in training, perks that encourage better work-life balance — to fill the employment gap.

For some workers, this news could provide guidance if a career change is on the table.

“If you’re up for changing careers, there are signs showing us that health care is a strong field — it’s a good opportunity now and in the future,” Bunker says in the report.

These are the industries having the hardest time filling open jobs, plus what they pay, according to BLS data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, open, median, workers, highest, jobs, teachers, share, salary, health, care, industries, jobsheres, pay


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McDonald’s wins praise for firing its CEO but reignites scrutiny over worker complaints

McDonald’s is garnering praise after deciding to fire its chief executive for having a relationship with an employee. But the decision is reigniting scrutiny of the company’s handling of sexual harassment incidents that involve restaurant workers. McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst, who headed the chain’s human resources department, departed the company on Monday. In August, McDonald’s announced that it would introduce new workplace training for restaurant workers and supervisors ce


McDonald’s is garnering praise after deciding to fire its chief executive for having a relationship with an employee.
But the decision is reigniting scrutiny of the company’s handling of sexual harassment incidents that involve restaurant workers.
McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst, who headed the chain’s human resources department, departed the company on Monday.
In August, McDonald’s announced that it would introduce new workplace training for restaurant workers and supervisors ce
McDonald’s wins praise for firing its CEO but reignites scrutiny over worker complaints Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sexual, firing, companys, reignites, company, scrutiny, mcdonalds, praise, ceo, wins, worker, executive, workplace, training, workers, chief, harassment, complaints


McDonald's wins praise for firing its CEO but reignites scrutiny over worker complaints

McDonald’s is garnering praise after deciding to fire its chief executive for having a relationship with an employee.

But the decision is reigniting scrutiny of the company’s handling of sexual harassment incidents that involve restaurant workers.

The Chicago-based company announced on Sunday that its board ousted CEO Steve Easterbrook for having a consensual relationship with an employee, a violation of the company’s non-fraternization policy.

“I think the board is acting decisively, showing leadership and setting an example to local franchise owners that the knives are out, and this kind of behavior is not going to be tolerated on any level,” Eric Schiffer, chief executive of Reputation Management Consultants, said.

Easterbrook’s severance package could be worth as much as $41.8 million, according to analysis by Equilar. His departure is part of broader trend, spurred on by the #MeToo Movement, that has led employers to reexamine how they handle workplace relationships that involve power imbalances.

“These days, what we find is boards are more worried about reputational risk, and they’re taking more action and acting more promptly,” said Davia Temin, the CEO of management consultancy Temin and Company.

McDonald’s Chief People Officer David Fairhurst, who headed the chain’s human resources department, departed the company on Monday.

Chris Kempczinski, who previously served as president of McDonald’s U.S. division, is the company’s new chief executive. During his tenure as the head of the company’s most important segment, McDonald’s workers have filed more than 50 complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for incidents that involved sexual harassment, abuse and retaliation.

“It’s clear McDonald’s culture is rotten from top to bottom. McDonald’s needs to sit down with worker-survivors and put them at the center of any solution,” the Fight for $15 and a Union, a fast-food workers’ coalition, said in a statement. “And the company needs to be completely transparent about Easterbrook’s firing and any other executive departures related to these issues.”

And while Easterbrook is leaving with a severance package despite being ousted, cashiers and cooks who have filed sexual harassment complaints allege that they have been fired or forced to quit – without a parachute in sight.

McDonald’s, for its part, has said that it has taken steps to address sexual harassment, abuse and retaliation.

After the latest wave of sexual harassment complaints were filed in May, Easterbrook wrote a letter viewed by CNBC that said McDonald’s started working with RAINN, the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization, a year ago to enhance its policies. The company also created a hotline for workers to anonymously report sexual harassment.

In August, McDonald’s announced that it would introduce new workplace training for restaurant workers and supervisors centered on harassment and workplace safety.

“Simply giving sexual harassment training is not sufficient,” Temin said, citing studies that have shown that men can be less sympathetic to victims after receiving training.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sexual, firing, companys, reignites, company, scrutiny, mcdonalds, praise, ceo, wins, worker, executive, workplace, training, workers, chief, harassment, complaints


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