Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on ‘upskilling’ in 2020 to attract and keep workers

Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute. Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce. Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale. 1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters,


Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute.
Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce.
Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale.
1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters,
Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on ‘upskilling’ in 2020 to attract and keep workers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, training, sector, manufacturing, skills, past, 262, workforce, workers, 2020, lee, billion, attract, spend, upskilling, manufacturers


Manufacturers to spend $26.2 billion on 'upskilling' in 2020 to attract and keep workers

A worker fits wheel hub badges on the Ford Focus automobile assembly line inside the Ford Motor Co. factory in Saarlouis, Germany, on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Ford expects hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) to make up over 50% of its European passenger vehicle sales by year-end 2022.

With a skills gap plaguing manufacturing in a historically tight labor market, companies are spending big to “upskill” their current workforce and ensure a pipeline of talent.

Manufacturers are set to spend $26.2 billion on internal and external training initiatives for new and existing employees in 2020 to combat the shortage of available workers, according to the Manufacturing Institute.

Nearly 70% of manufacturers said they are creating or expanding training programs for their workforce. Three-quarters of respondents said upskilling workers helped to improve productivity, promotion opportunities and morale.

“In manufacturing, you are constantly learning and growing, and the technological change is enormous,” said Carolyn Lee, the institute’s executive director. “What you are going to be able to continue to do as you layer new skills, on top of those fundamental skills, will make for a very interesting and dynamic career.”

The skills gap has been the No. 1 challenge for manufacturers for the past nine quarters, according to the National Association of Manufacturers’ Outlook Survey, which found the inability to attract and retain workers has been a top concern.

In the third quarter, nearly 80% of respondents said they are struggling to fill open positions. The lack of available workers has even forced one-third of companies to turn down business opportunities.

Protolabs, a rapid prototyping manufacturer based in Maple Plain, Minnesota, is looking to add about 70 workers to its workforce of 2,800.

“We are a growth company, and employees are critical to everything that we do. We want to be sure we can keep talent with us,” said Robert Bodor, vice president and general manager for the Americas.

While the company has been fortunate in retaining its workers, Bodor said the goal is to maintain a “good culture of continuous improvement.” So Protolabs is investing in training its existing workforce, as well as new hires. To attract workers in this job market, Protolabs is offering new and flexible models with part-time labor, in addition to offering training and benefits such as a 401(k) plan with an employer match, employee stock-participation plans, and more.

“We do both upskill and bring in new people all the time — we are continually hiring so we have to train and onboard new employees — but we are reinvesting in our employees to create career paths and opportunities for personal growth,” Bodor said. “Our employees are critical to our success, so we want to be creating longevity with them.”

Securing the pipeline of future talent is a key to success for manufacturers. Data from Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute found that some 4.6 million workers will be needed in the sector by 2028, but that 2.4 million of those jobs could go unfilled if steps aren’t taken to ensure proper training. Lee calls recruitment a “full-court press.” The goal of the organization is to close the skills gap by 25% by 2025.

“We just need more people — period,” Lee said. “We have about 480,000 open jobs, and have been hovering around 500,000 openings in the past year after retirements and economic growth. We need to attract transitioning service members and veterans into the sector, and we need to bring the next generation of the workforce into the sector.”

Part of the recruitment efforts beyond training is showing potential hires the changes the sector has gone through — it’s not the manufacturing job of years past. Instead, its high-tech, clean, and can be lucrative for those who move up the ranks. Manufacturing Day, which was held in October, is part of that effort, where manufacturers across the country open their doors to students so they can see for themselves what a career in the sector is all about.

“You should know entering manufacturing that your employer is going invest in you, because you are their greatest resource,” Lee said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: kate rogers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, training, sector, manufacturing, skills, past, 262, workforce, workers, 2020, lee, billion, attract, spend, upskilling, manufacturers


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Labor costs for Detroit automakers expected to increase upward of $1 billion by 2023

DETROIT – Labor costs for the Detroit automakers are expected to increase by up to roughly $1 billion in the coming years as a result of contracts ratified last year with the United Auto Workers union. Based on the number of workers in each company, the increased labor cost would add between $800 million and $1 billion to the automakers’ expenses by 2023. Labor costs for non-unionized foreign automakers in the U.S. are expected to increase by an average of just $2 an hour by 2023, according to C


DETROIT – Labor costs for the Detroit automakers are expected to increase by up to roughly $1 billion in the coming years as a result of contracts ratified last year with the United Auto Workers union.
Based on the number of workers in each company, the increased labor cost would add between $800 million and $1 billion to the automakers’ expenses by 2023.
Labor costs for non-unionized foreign automakers in the U.S. are expected to increase by an average of just $2 an hour by 2023, according to C
Labor costs for Detroit automakers expected to increase upward of $1 billion by 2023 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, detroit, workers, increase, average, costs, worker, foreign, billion, 2023, automakers, labor, upward


Labor costs for Detroit automakers expected to increase upward of $1 billion by 2023

DETROIT – Labor costs for the Detroit automakers are expected to increase by up to roughly $1 billion in the coming years as a result of contracts ratified last year with the United Auto Workers union.

The Center for Automotive Research on Wednesday forecast average hourly labor costs during the four-year deals will increase by $11 per worker for Fiat Chrysler and $8 per worker at General Motors and Ford Motor.

Based on the number of workers in each company, the increased labor cost would add between $800 million and $1 billion to the automakers’ expenses by 2023. Those are costs the companies will look to offset in other ways, however they are expected to widen labor cost gaps with foreign competitors that don’t have a unionized workforce in the U.S. like Toyota Motor.

“The gap with the non-union automakers has widened quite a bit,” Kristin Dziczek, vice president of industry, labor and economics at CAR, said during a presentation on the results.

Labor costs for non-unionized foreign automakers in the U.S. are expected to increase by an average of just $2 an hour by 2023, according to CAR, a nonprofit research group based in Ann Arbor, Mich.

CAR estimates Fiat Chrysler’s average hourly labor costs per worker will increase to $66 by 2023; GM will hit $71; and Ford will jump to $69. That compares to non-unionized foreign automakers at $52 an hour on average during that time period.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: michael wayland
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, detroit, workers, increase, average, costs, worker, foreign, billion, 2023, automakers, labor, upward


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Here’s how your Social Security cost-of-living adjustment is calculated – and what it could look like in 2021

People line up outside the Social Security Administration office in San Francisco. Getty ImagesIf you collect Social Security benefits, you’re probably already eagerly waiting to see what your cost-of-living adjustment will be next year. New, early estimates from The Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group, point to a possible 1.5% COLA increase for 2021. Meanwhile, Social Security COLAs have averaged 1.4% in the past decade. How those adjustments are calculatedThe Social Security Adm


People line up outside the Social Security Administration office in San Francisco.
Getty ImagesIf you collect Social Security benefits, you’re probably already eagerly waiting to see what your cost-of-living adjustment will be next year.
New, early estimates from The Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group, point to a possible 1.5% COLA increase for 2021.
Meanwhile, Social Security COLAs have averaged 1.4% in the past decade.
How those adjustments are calculatedThe Social Security Adm
Here’s how your Social Security cost-of-living adjustment is calculated – and what it could look like in 2021 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, 2021, security, increase, percentage, costofliving, cola, calculated, month, senior, administration, quarter, look, heres, workers, adjustment


Here's how your Social Security cost-of-living adjustment is calculated – and what it could look like in 2021

People line up outside the Social Security Administration office in San Francisco. Getty Images

If you collect Social Security benefits, you’re probably already eagerly waiting to see what your cost-of-living adjustment will be next year. New, early estimates from The Senior Citizens League, a nonpartisan senior group, point to a possible 1.5% COLA increase for 2021. In 2020, Social Security recipients got a 1.6% increase. For retired workers, that meant their average monthly benefit increased to $1,503 per month, up from $1,479 per month. Meanwhile, Social Security COLAs have averaged 1.4% in the past decade.

How those adjustments are calculated

The Social Security Administration generally announces its COLA in October for the following year. The amount is calculated based on the percentage change for the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W. That index comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics at the Department of Labor.

To calculate the next year’s COLA, the Social Security Administration tracks data from the third quarter of the last year to the third quarter of the current year. Of note, it is not guaranteed there will be an increase from year to year. That is because the COLA is equal to the percentage increase in the CPI-W. If there is no increase, then the COLA is zero. Social Security checks did not go up in 2010, 2011 and 2016. Meanwhile, in other years, the COLA increase has been well above average. For 2019, the increase was 2.8%. And in 2009, beneficiaries saw a 5.8% bump.

How benefits could shape up in 2021


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, 2021, security, increase, percentage, costofliving, cola, calculated, month, senior, administration, quarter, look, heres, workers, adjustment


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Instacart holds firm on its tipping policy as contract workers call for national boycott

Instacart isn’t budging on the default tip rate on its platform amid growing calls for food and grocery delivery companies to increase payouts to contract workers. Nilam Ganenthiran, Instacart’s president, said the current 5% rate is appropriate as the default, though customers have the option of giving more. “I truly think it’s right for our shoppers, right for our customers and right for the ecosystem,” Ganenthiran told CNBC. Workers, who have lobbied the company to reinstate the 10% default t


Instacart isn’t budging on the default tip rate on its platform amid growing calls for food and grocery delivery companies to increase payouts to contract workers.
Nilam Ganenthiran, Instacart’s president, said the current 5% rate is appropriate as the default, though customers have the option of giving more.
“I truly think it’s right for our shoppers, right for our customers and right for the ecosystem,” Ganenthiran told CNBC.
Workers, who have lobbied the company to reinstate the 10% default t
Instacart holds firm on its tipping policy as contract workers call for national boycott Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: deirdre bosa jr reed, deirdre bosa, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, ganenthiran, policy, holds, boycott, firm, workers, food, tipping, company, right, default, instacart, national, customers, contract, tip


Instacart holds firm on its tipping policy as contract workers call for national boycott

A shopper for Instacart navigates through the aisles as she shops for a customer.

Instacart isn’t budging on the default tip rate on its platform amid growing calls for food and grocery delivery companies to increase payouts to contract workers.

Nilam Ganenthiran, Instacart’s president, said the current 5% rate is appropriate as the default, though customers have the option of giving more.

“I truly think it’s right for our shoppers, right for our customers and right for the ecosystem,” Ganenthiran told CNBC.

Instacart counts on contractors to shop for customers’ orders and, in many cases, deliver them to their door. Workers, who have lobbied the company to reinstate the 10% default tip that was reduced in 2016, are calling for a national boycott on Sunday, following a three-day strike in November. In an open letter to customers published on Medium, a group called “Instacart workers” is also urging customers to show their support on Twitter with a #DeleteInstacart hashtag on the day of the boycott.

The tipping fight gained attention last year after food delivery service DoorDash was criticized for not paying drivers the full amount that customers tipped. The company responded by announcing that it was changing its model so that “every dollar customers tip will be an extra dollar in their Dasher’s pocket, and customers will be able to tip at checkout or after the delivery.”

Still, in November, District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine brought charges against DoorDash, accusing the company of pocketing tips meant for workers and misleading customers about where their money was going.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: deirdre bosa jr reed, deirdre bosa, jr reed
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, ganenthiran, policy, holds, boycott, firm, workers, food, tipping, company, right, default, instacart, national, customers, contract, tip


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There are now more women working in the US than men—and these cultural shifts are part of the reason why

Currently, women make up 50.04% of payroll jobs in the U.S., signaling that women are benefiting more than men from today’s tight labor market. When looking at the growth rate of these industries, construction and manufacturing added 356,000 jobs to the economy between 2018 and 2019. Also, with women outnumbering men at all levels of post-secondary education, many male-dominated industries are now starting to see an increase of women entering the field. “Whenever you have these economic shifts,


Currently, women make up 50.04% of payroll jobs in the U.S., signaling that women are benefiting more than men from today’s tight labor market.
When looking at the growth rate of these industries, construction and manufacturing added 356,000 jobs to the economy between 2018 and 2019.
Also, with women outnumbering men at all levels of post-secondary education, many male-dominated industries are now starting to see an increase of women entering the field.
“Whenever you have these economic shifts,
There are now more women working in the US than men—and these cultural shifts are part of the reason why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cultural, economy, workers, women, men, tight, shifts, manufacturing, reason, menand, working, labor, workforce, jobs, industries


There are now more women working in the US than men—and these cultural shifts are part of the reason why

“The economy created exactly 10 times as many jobs in the services sector than in the goods-producing sector in 2019,” she explains. “So, it was a very weak year for male-dominated manufacturing, oil and gas industries and a very strong year for female-dominated industries such as health care and education.”

Currently, women make up 50.04% of payroll jobs in the U.S., signaling that women are benefiting more than men from today’s tight labor market.

As the U.S. economy continues to see consistent job gains, women are now outnumbering men in the U.S. workforce for the first time since 2010, according to the latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics .

According to the Economic Policy Institute, men make up 77% of employment in construction and manufacturing sectors, while women make up 77% of employment in education and healthcare sectors. When looking at the growth rate of these industries, construction and manufacturing added 356,000 jobs to the economy between 2018 and 2019. Meanwhile, education and healthcare added 603,000 jobs to the economy during the same time period.

Economists at the Bureau of Labor Statistics credit the decline of manufacturing jobs to several factors, including trade war issues with China and a shift in skills needed, putting more men who had once been qualified enough to work in the industry out of work. “Between 2000 and 2017, as employment rates declined in the manufacturing sector, college-educated men saw their annual work hours reduced by 7.4%, compared with a 0.7% reduction for college-educated women,” the BLS reports.

Also, with women outnumbering men at all levels of post-secondary education, many male-dominated industries are now starting to see an increase of women entering the field.

For instance, women now make up 13.8% of mining and logging jobs, which is up from 12.6% a year ago, reports Bloomberg. And with a tight labor market that includes more employers being hungry for talent, Pollak says many industries are widening their net and creating flexible opportunities that allow women who left the workforce for motherhood to re-enter.

“Whenever you have these economic shifts, they also tend to cause cultural shifts too,” she adds. So in addition to seeing more women entering the workforce, Pollak says that the latest jobs report could also point to more men being willing to stay at home.

According to data from Pew Research Center, the number of stay-at-home dads between 1989 and 2016 had almost doubled from 4% to 7%. Meanwhile, the number of stay-at-home moms remained almost unchanged, with a slight decrease from 28% in 1989 to 27% in 2016.

“We’re noticing that it’s increasingly becoming cool to be a stay-at-home dad,” she says, “which is allowing women, in some cases, to go to work.”

Though the tight labor market is showing signs of continued opportunity for women, Pollak points out that not everyone is being positively impacted by the economy.

“Despite how tight the labor market is and how exciting the outcomes are, there are still some disappointing parts, including a stubbornly high number of discouraged workers and long-time unemployed workers,” she says. “These people being left behind are more likely to be men than women because they have a higher chance of having been incarcerated and a higher chance of being affected by the opioid crisis.”

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Don’t miss: Just 9.1% of America’s construction workers are women—here’s what it’s like to be one of them


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-14  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cultural, economy, workers, women, men, tight, shifts, manufacturing, reason, menand, working, labor, workforce, jobs, industries


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Boeing 737 Max crisis could slow US growth by a half point in 2020, Mnuchin says

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday that Boeing’s 737 Max crisis could curb U.S. economic growth in 2020 by half a point, though he expects the economy should grow by about 2.5%. “Boeing is one of the largest exporters, and with the 737 Max, I think that could impact GDP as much as 50 basis points this year.” Boeing this month is planning to halt production of the 737 Max, as the worldwide grounding of the planes after two fatal crashes killed 346 people. Mnuchin said he expects the U.


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday that Boeing’s 737 Max crisis could curb U.S. economic growth in 2020 by half a point, though he expects the economy should grow by about 2.5%.
“Boeing is one of the largest exporters, and with the 737 Max, I think that could impact GDP as much as 50 basis points this year.”
Boeing this month is planning to halt production of the 737 Max, as the worldwide grounding of the planes after two fatal crashes killed 346 people.
Mnuchin said he expects the U.
Boeing 737 Max crisis could slow US growth by a half point in 2020, Mnuchin says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, deal, economic, mnuchin, growth, workers, max, crisis, 2020, planes, point, 737, boeing, boeings, half, slow


Boeing 737 Max crisis could slow US growth by a half point in 2020, Mnuchin says

U.S. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin announces new sanctions on Iran in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, January 10, 2020.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday that Boeing’s 737 Max crisis could curb U.S. economic growth in 2020 by half a point, though he expects the economy should grow by about 2.5%.

“There’s no question that the Boeing situation is going to slow down the GDP numbers,” Mnuchin said in an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures.” “Boeing is one of the largest exporters, and with the 737 Max, I think that could impact GDP as much as 50 basis points this year.”

Boeing this month is planning to halt production of the 737 Max, as the worldwide grounding of the planes after two fatal crashes killed 346 people. Regulators say they have no firm timeline to allow the planes to fly again, and U.S. airlines have taken the planes out of their schedules until at least April.

The crisis has already led to layoffs in Boeing’s supply chain and the grounding has sapped cash from companies that make parts for the beleaguered planes. Spirit Aerosystems, which makes fuselages for the 737 Max, announced initial layoffs of about 2,800 employees at its Wichita, Kansas plant and warned that others could be on the way.

Boeing has said it has no plans to lay off workers and last week outlined plans to reassign about 3,000 of its 737 Max workers to other parts of the company, including the 777X and 767 aircraft programs.

The fallout has cut more than $50 billion from Boeing’s market value and has cost airlines more than $1 billion.

“For this year, we’ve been looking at 2.5 to 3%, as I said, it may be closer to 2.5 because of the adjustment of the Boeing numbers,” Mnuchin said regarding 2020 economic growth. “But this would have been 3% otherwise.”

The U.S. economy remains in the midst of the longest economic expansion on record, though some economists expect slowing growth and a potential recession over the next 12 months.

Mnuchin said he expects the U.S.-China phase-one trade deal and the U.S-Mexico-Canada Agreement to add significantly to economic growth in 2020.

The U.S. and China plan to sign a phase-one trade deal on Wednesday, which includes China purchasing $200 billion worth of U.S. goods over the next two years and the U.S. reducing tariffs on about $120 billion worth of Chinese products.

The Senate Finance Committee also approved the new North American trade deal last Tuesday, but the deal still needs to be passed by the full Senate. The trade deal will take effect once all three countries ratify it. The USMCA makes changes to protect auto industry workers, increases access to Canadian dairy markets for U.S. farmers and updates digital trade rules.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-12  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, deal, economic, mnuchin, growth, workers, max, crisis, 2020, planes, point, 737, boeing, boeings, half, slow


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December jobs report is not as disappointing as it appears

Wage growth was expected at 3.1% year over year, but it came in at just 2.9%. Some economists had expected the report to beat those expectations. “On top of that, you also avoid overall inflation on the economy. There was also the expectation that wage growth would become a bigger factor, after nonsupervisory worker pay showed signs of picking up recently. We’re still in an environment of benign wage inflation.


Wage growth was expected at 3.1% year over year, but it came in at just 2.9%.
Some economists had expected the report to beat those expectations.
“On top of that, you also avoid overall inflation on the economy.
There was also the expectation that wage growth would become a bigger factor, after nonsupervisory worker pay showed signs of picking up recently.
We’re still in an environment of benign wage inflation.
December jobs report is not as disappointing as it appears Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mccarthy, inflation, revisions, appears, wage, jobs, economy, disappointing, workers, overall, report, expected, growth


December jobs report is not as disappointing as it appears

Workers prepare orders in the kitchen at the newest Chopt Creative Salad Co., location in New York City, November 12, 2019.

Job growth in December slowed and wage growth was lower than expected, but the government’s employment report Friday assured markets that the labor market remains strong enough and inflation is not likely to be a problem in the near future.

The 145,000 nonfarm payrolls created in December were below the 160,000 expected by economists. Wage growth was expected at 3.1% year over year, but it came in at just 2.9%. Some economists had expected the report to beat those expectations.

“I think the overall picture is good,” said Matt Orton, Carillon Tower Advisers vice president and portfolio specialist. “On top of that, you also avoid overall inflation on the economy. It gives the Fed the ability to hit pause, pushing any rate hike further down the road.”

Stocks were higher after the report, with all the major indexes hitting new highs and the Dow surging above 29,000 for the first time. Treasury yields were mostly lower, with the 10-year at 1.84 percent.

“It was a little soft, but it doesn’t change the narrative if you believe the economy is fine,” said John Briggs, head of strategy at NatWest Markets. “It’s good enough, and if you believe the economy is weakening, it’s not really an advance on that. … Some people have been toying with the idea we’re going to get inflation this year. I don’t see where its coming from. This doesn’t help that argument. If you had the idea the Fed might get more hawkish, it’s not in this number.”

After revisions, monthly job gains averaged just 184,000 from October through December. A strike at General Motors reduced October’s payroll growth, which was 154,000, after revisions. November surged to 256,000, post revisions, as workers returned.

But Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies, said he was concerned that manufacturing employment lost 12,000 workers and had not stabilized in the December report.

Some economists had expected a decline, due to a slowdown on manufacturing at Boeing, which was expected to reduce its workforce as it deals with its 737 Max crisis. McCarthy said another negative was the surprise dip in professional and business services job growth, which was just 10,000, well below trend but possibly a one-time issue.

“It’s nothing to be overly concerned about,” said McCarthy. “The data is mixed. Overall, it provides a positive picture of the economy and the labor market, and we will continue to see the labor market generate jobs. It’s probably not going to generate jobs as fast primarily because of the pool of available labor.”

Economists had been expecting a slowing in job growth simply because employers can’t find workers to fill many jobs.

There was also the expectation that wage growth would become a bigger factor, after nonsupervisory worker pay showed signs of picking up recently. “Those gains were revised away,” said McCarthy.

Economists said higher wages could still emerge in the next few months, but for now wage growth is more sluggish than expected, and that could be seen as positive in some ways.

“When you take the flip side, there are still wage gains,” Orton said. “But where it is most important is on the corporate side. We’re still in an environment of benign wage inflation. That’s generally supportive of keeping costs in check. That should be supportive of corporate earnings.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mccarthy, inflation, revisions, appears, wage, jobs, economy, disappointing, workers, overall, report, expected, growth


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Boeing 737 Max supplier Spirit Aerosystems to cut 2,800 jobs as workers feel pain of grounding

An employee drills holes for rivets in a frame inside a Boeing 737 fuselage during assembly at Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita, Kansas. A key Boeing 737 Max supplier said Friday that it is planning to cut about 2,800 jobs as the planes remain grounded far longer than expected and the financial impact ripples through the aerospace company’s supply chain. The 737 Max accounts for half of Spirit’s revenue. Spirit said it would also make smaller job cuts at two plants in Oklahoma. The job cuts come as


An employee drills holes for rivets in a frame inside a Boeing 737 fuselage during assembly at Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita, Kansas.
A key Boeing 737 Max supplier said Friday that it is planning to cut about 2,800 jobs as the planes remain grounded far longer than expected and the financial impact ripples through the aerospace company’s supply chain.
The 737 Max accounts for half of Spirit’s revenue.
Spirit said it would also make smaller job cuts at two plants in Oklahoma.
The job cuts come as
Boeing 737 Max supplier Spirit Aerosystems to cut 2,800 jobs as workers feel pain of grounding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cut, pain, job, wanted, cuts, boeing, employees, spirit, supplier, jobs, workers, feel, planes, grounding, notice, max, 737


Boeing 737 Max supplier Spirit Aerosystems to cut 2,800 jobs as workers feel pain of grounding

An employee drills holes for rivets in a frame inside a Boeing 737 fuselage during assembly at Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita, Kansas.

A key Boeing 737 Max supplier said Friday that it is planning to cut about 2,800 jobs as the planes remain grounded far longer than expected and the financial impact ripples through the aerospace company’s supply chain.

Wichita, Kansas-based Spirit Aerosystems, which produces fuselages for the beleaguered planes, said it made the decision due to uncertainty around the Max’s return to service. The company’s shares fell after its announcement, trading down 2.7%. Boeing was off nearly 1.5%.

The 737 Max accounts for half of Spirit’s revenue. The planes have been grounded since mid-March after the second of two fatal crashes — one in Indonesia in 2018 and another in Ethiopia nearly five months later — killed all 346 people on board the flights. Regulators haven’t said when they would allow the planes to fly again

“This is not the news I wanted to share, and I know it’s not the news you wanted to hear,” CEO Tom Gentile told employees on Friday. “But the continued grounding of the Max fleet and the suspension of production has created a challenging situation for us.” In addition to fuselages, Spirit makes thrust reversers, engine pylons and wing parts.

Spirit, which issued what’s known as a WARN notice that requires companies to give employees 60 days notice of mass layoffs, said more job cuts are possible, a sign of how Boeing’s 737 Max crisis continues to hurt suppliers and the communities where they’re based. The laid-off employees, while they will have to depart in the coming weeks, will be paid for the entire 60-day notice period, Spirit said.

Spirit said it would also make smaller job cuts at two plants in Oklahoma.

The job cuts come as Boeing is facing a deepening crisis over the jets, its bestselling aircraft.

The company released hundreds of explosive messages on Thursday night, which were shared with lawmakers investigating the plane, that showed Boeing employees boasting about bullying regulators and disparaging the 737 Max as a plane “designed by clowns who in turn are supervised by monkeys.”

Boeing called the messages “completely unacceptable.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: leslie josephs
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cut, pain, job, wanted, cuts, boeing, employees, spirit, supplier, jobs, workers, feel, planes, grounding, notice, max, 737


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Dell just put out a mammoth 43-inch monitor for traders — and we tried it for a week

So Dell wants to sell these firms much larger displays that can consolidate the wall of screens into one wall-sized screen — Dell sells monitors big as 49 inches from corner to corner. Any bigger, and the company considers them to be a “collaboration monitor” for mounting on a wall or in a conference room. Dell’s not the only company that is now making larger and larger monitors. Dell’s 43-inch monitor, which I recently tried, will retail for $1,049, for instance. “Users understand the productiv


So Dell wants to sell these firms much larger displays that can consolidate the wall of screens into one wall-sized screen — Dell sells monitors big as 49 inches from corner to corner.
Any bigger, and the company considers them to be a “collaboration monitor” for mounting on a wall or in a conference room.
Dell’s not the only company that is now making larger and larger monitors.
Dell’s 43-inch monitor, which I recently tried, will retail for $1,049, for instance.
“Users understand the productiv
Dell just put out a mammoth 43-inch monitor for traders — and we tried it for a week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tried, screen, large, dell, trading, workers, traders, 43inch, wall, monitors, monitor, week, mammoth, displays, larger


Dell just put out a mammoth 43-inch monitor for traders — and we tried it for a week

The enduring image of a trading floor is a cacophonous gaggle of men yelling to buy and sell stocks and other securities.

But these days, trading floors are more likely to be dominated by batteries of screens — some desks are equipped with several different displays for a financial terminal, news alerts, tickers, instant messages, and Microsoft Excel.

“A lot of the employees even in large financial institutions are working on older monitors that can be over 5 years old,” said Vinay Jayakumar, product marketing manager at Dell. “We looked at the trading floor and they were often using 19-inch monitors, in multiples of 4 or 8 or 12 smaller monitors.”

So Dell wants to sell these firms much larger displays that can consolidate the wall of screens into one wall-sized screen — Dell sells monitors big as 49 inches from corner to corner. Any bigger, and the company considers them to be a “collaboration monitor” for mounting on a wall or in a conference room. A TV, basically.

Dell’s not the only company that is now making larger and larger monitors. In fact, massive high-end panels were a major theme at CES, the annual Las Vegas trade show for consumer electronics that took place last week.

Acer, for example, announced a $2,999 55-inch monitor targeted at gamers. For office use, Lenovo revealed a 34-inch widescreen curved monitor priced at $799. While Apple didn’t announce new monitors at CES, it released its first monitor in years in December: The $4,999, 32-inch Pro Display XDR…with a $1,000 stand sold separately. But that screen is basically a miniature compared to other new monitors.

These displays are expensive. Dell’s 43-inch monitor, which I recently tried, will retail for $1,049, for instance. But the price could be justified by businesses if it makes high-value workers like traders more productive.

“Users understand the productivity gain by using high-res large screen monitor,” Gartner analyst Mikako Kitagawa said. “In the meantime, large size monitors have become more affordable.”

Another trend driving growing monitors? Laptops, which have become standard issue equipment for knowledge workers, have become much better at attaching to external monitors and docking stations, says Kitagawa.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tried, screen, large, dell, trading, workers, traders, 43inch, wall, monitors, monitor, week, mammoth, displays, larger


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These 20 companies around the world are on a hiring spree for work-from-home jobs

The potential to work for a company from anywhere in the world has never been greater. Many remote workers are highly compensated (nearly a quarter earn $100,000 or more) and they tend to be happier in their jobs. To determine which employers are leading the charge in this space, FlexJobs identified the best companies to work for to land a work-from-home job today. The job listing site analyzed its database of over 54,000 companies and identified the ones that posted the highest number of remote


The potential to work for a company from anywhere in the world has never been greater.
Many remote workers are highly compensated (nearly a quarter earn $100,000 or more) and they tend to be happier in their jobs.
To determine which employers are leading the charge in this space, FlexJobs identified the best companies to work for to land a work-from-home job today.
The job listing site analyzed its database of over 54,000 companies and identified the ones that posted the highest number of remote
These 20 companies around the world are on a hiring spree for work-from-home jobs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, job, world, work, remote, hiring, company, companies, spree, workfromhome, jobs, identified, workers, resources


These 20 companies around the world are on a hiring spree for work-from-home jobs

The potential to work for a company from anywhere in the world has never been greater.

According to a report from the Society for Human Resources Management, 69% of organizations allowed employees to work from home at least some of the time in 2019 — more than three times the share of companies who allowed telecommuting 20 years ago.

Many remote workers are highly compensated (nearly a quarter earn $100,000 or more) and they tend to be happier in their jobs. A combination of factors, including improved worker satisfaction, greater productivity and more efficient use of company resources, are some reasons why the ability to work from just about anywhere is one of the biggest workplace trends to watch for in 2020 and beyond.

To determine which employers are leading the charge in this space, FlexJobs identified the best companies to work for to land a work-from-home job today.

The job listing site analyzed its database of over 54,000 companies and identified the ones that posted the highest number of remote jobs in 2019, suggesting they’ll continue to hire a large amount of remote workers in the new year. Jobs on the site can be advertised as being a either part-time or full-time remote work arrangement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, site, job, world, work, remote, hiring, company, companies, spree, workfromhome, jobs, identified, workers, resources


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