US workers forfeited 200 million vacation days last year

With the holidays quickly approaching, there’s one gift most people forget to give themselves: a break. In fact, 1 in 4 working Americans have nine or more days of paid time off remaining this year, according to a recent work-life balance report by vacation and travel website Priceline. That’s more than most workers can, or will, use by Jan. 1, Priceline found, which means many of those hard-earned days off will be left behind. “Our advice is to treat your paid time off like any other work proje


With the holidays quickly approaching, there’s one gift most people forget to give themselves: a break. In fact, 1 in 4 working Americans have nine or more days of paid time off remaining this year, according to a recent work-life balance report by vacation and travel website Priceline. That’s more than most workers can, or will, use by Jan. 1, Priceline found, which means many of those hard-earned days off will be left behind. “Our advice is to treat your paid time off like any other work proje
US workers forfeited 200 million vacation days last year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jessica dickler, david ramos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unused, working, priceline, website, workers, worklife, paid, vacation, million, 200, days, work, forfeited


US workers forfeited 200 million vacation days last year

With the holidays quickly approaching, there’s one gift most people forget to give themselves: a break.

In fact, 1 in 4 working Americans have nine or more days of paid time off remaining this year, according to a recent work-life balance report by vacation and travel website Priceline.

That’s more than most workers can, or will, use by Jan. 1, Priceline found, which means many of those hard-earned days off will be left behind. Priceline polled more than 1,000 adults in October.

“Too often, people begin the year expecting to take full advantage of the vacation time they’re given, but find themselves scrambling to use those days as December approaches,” Priceline CEO Brett Keller said in a statement.

“Our advice is to treat your paid time off like any other work project,” he said. “Plan ahead, keep track of the days available, and don’t let the year end with that time unused.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: jessica dickler, david ramos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unused, working, priceline, website, workers, worklife, paid, vacation, million, 200, days, work, forfeited


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Rain could hamper the search for victims of the California wildfires

But her daughter has seen names of friends who are OK and called sheriff’s officials to let them know. “But like I said, there’s been other friends’ names on the list that have been accounted for and taken off.” Meanwhile, those searching for bodies were in a race against the weather, as rain was forecast for Wednesday. California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones said it is “way too early” to estimate the damage done by the wildfire. But for perspective, he said the Northern California fires th


But her daughter has seen names of friends who are OK and called sheriff’s officials to let them know. “But like I said, there’s been other friends’ names on the list that have been accounted for and taken off.” Meanwhile, those searching for bodies were in a race against the weather, as rain was forecast for Wednesday. California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones said it is “way too early” to estimate the damage done by the wildfire. But for perspective, he said the Northern California fires th
Rain could hamper the search for victims of the California wildfires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: carl mondon, the mercury news via getty images, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hamper, safe, working, wrote, san, wildfire, names, rain, miles, friends, search, list, wildfires, shelter, victims, california


Rain could hamper the search for victims of the California wildfires

Survivors and relatives of those caught in the fire in Northern California are using social media to get the word out: In some cases, to post that their loved ones were safe; in others, to plead for help.

“Aunt Dorothy is still missing. There has been confusion going on at the Sheriffs office regarding her whereabouts because she was taken off the list,” a man wrote on Facebook on Monday.

“I have an uncle and two cousins that I have not been able to make contact with,” one woman wrote on Facebook, with their names. “Any info would be appreciated.”

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea has said he released the rough and incomplete list in hopes that people would contact authorities to say they are OK. He has called it “raw data” compiled from phone calls, emails and other reports.

“We put the list out. It will fluctuate. It will go up. It will go down because this is in a state of flux,” Honea said Monday. “My view on this has been that I would prefer to get the information out and start working to find who is unaccounted for and who is not. I would put progress over perfection.”

Officials have also culled reports from the earliest hours of the disaster, when fire knocked out mobile phone communications and thousands fled, some to safe shelter that was hundreds of miles away.

Honea said his office was working with the Red Cross to account for people entering and leaving shelters. Evacuees are also helping authorities narrow the list, sometimes by chance.

Robert James Miles, who lost his Paradise trailer in the blaze, was staying at a shelter in Chico where people posted names of those they hadn’t heard from. Miles said he alerted a Red Cross worker Saturday that he recognized eight names on the board as friends he knew were OK.

“Two of them were in the shelter,” he said with a chuckle.

Owen and Phyllis Suihkonen understand the chaos. Their family is scattered after they lost their home to the wildfire, as did their two adult children.

Phyllis Suihkonen, 69, says she spotted the names of two friends on the list of unaccounted people, and doesn’t know if they are safe. But her daughter has seen names of friends who are OK and called sheriff’s officials to let them know.

“I’m concerned,” Phyllis said. “But like I said, there’s been other friends’ names on the list that have been accounted for and taken off.”

Meanwhile, those searching for bodies were in a race against the weather, as rain was forecast for Wednesday. The precipitation could help knock out the flames, but it could also hinder the search by washing away fragmentary remains and turning ash into a thick paste.

The fire, which burned at least 236 square miles (611 square kilometers) and destroyed nearly 12,000 homes, was 70 percent contained on Monday.

Alcatraz Island, San Francisco’s cable cars, the Oakland Zoo and other San Francisco Bay Area area attractions were closed Monday because of smoke from the blaze some 140 miles (225 kilometers) away. Several San Francisco museums over the weekend offered free admission to give people something to do indoors.

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones said it is “way too early” to estimate the damage done by the wildfire. But for perspective, he said the Northern California fires that gutted 6,800 homes last year resulted in $12.6 billion in insured losses.

“It’s going to be a long and painful process,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: carl mondon, the mercury news via getty images, digital first media, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hamper, safe, working, wrote, san, wildfire, names, rain, miles, friends, search, list, wildfires, shelter, victims, california


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Here’s how to overcome poor retirement planning

As the economy strengthens, more workers nearing retirement age are feeling better about their economic prospects. Still, many others are worried about their savings, or lack of savings, and how they will get by once they stop working for good. Overall, 85 percent of working Americans said retirement will be a “positive new chapter in life,” according to a recent retirement study by Wells Fargo, which polled more than 2,500 adults in August. More than half of Americans, or 57 percent, have less


As the economy strengthens, more workers nearing retirement age are feeling better about their economic prospects. Still, many others are worried about their savings, or lack of savings, and how they will get by once they stop working for good. Overall, 85 percent of working Americans said retirement will be a “positive new chapter in life,” according to a recent retirement study by Wells Fargo, which polled more than 2,500 adults in August. More than half of Americans, or 57 percent, have less
Here’s how to overcome poor retirement planning Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, overcome, money, americans, boomers, positive, heres, according, retirement, planning, workers, worried, poor, savings


Here's how to overcome poor retirement planning

As the economy strengthens, more workers nearing retirement age are feeling better about their economic prospects. That’s the good news.

Still, many others are worried about their savings, or lack of savings, and how they will get by once they stop working for good.

Overall, 85 percent of working Americans said retirement will be a “positive new chapter in life,” according to a recent retirement study by Wells Fargo, which polled more than 2,500 adults in August.

However, 70 percent of respondents also said they are concerned about running out of money. And rightfully so.

More than half of Americans, or 57 percent, have less than $1,000 in their savings accounts, according to a separate GOBankingRates survey.

Another report by the Stanford Center on Longevity found that nearly one-third of baby boomers had no money saved in retirement plans in 2014, when they were on average 58 years old.

Among boomers with positive balances, the median savings was around $200,000.

For these soon-to-be retirees, it’s not too late to get back on track to financial stability, experts say. Here’s how:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, working, overcome, money, americans, boomers, positive, heres, according, retirement, planning, workers, worried, poor, savings


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Huawei voice assistant to rival Amazon Alexa and Google outside China

Huawei is working on its own voice assistant that works outside of China, potentially pitting it against software produced by Google and Amazon. In China, Huawei has its own voice assistant called Xiaoyi which operates in its smart speaker called the AI Cube and its smartphones. Now the technology giant is working on a voice assistant that will work outside China. “In the beginning, we are mainly using Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa” for its AI Cube and smartphones, he said. However, any step


Huawei is working on its own voice assistant that works outside of China, potentially pitting it against software produced by Google and Amazon. In China, Huawei has its own voice assistant called Xiaoyi which operates in its smart speaker called the AI Cube and its smartphones. Now the technology giant is working on a voice assistant that will work outside China. “In the beginning, we are mainly using Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa” for its AI Cube and smartphones, he said. However, any step
Huawei voice assistant to rival Amazon Alexa and Google outside China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, alexa, smartphones, google, voice, rival, huawei, using, amazon, working, ai, assistant, outside


Huawei voice assistant to rival Amazon Alexa and Google outside China

Huawei is working on its own voice assistant that works outside of China, potentially pitting it against software produced by Google and Amazon.

In China, Huawei has its own voice assistant called Xiaoyi which operates in its smart speaker called the AI Cube and its smartphones. But it is only for the Chinese market.

Now the technology giant is working on a voice assistant that will work outside China.

“We are using our own in China, in (the) future we will also have our own outside of China,” Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business, told CNBC in an exclusive interview.

“In the beginning, we are mainly using Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa” for its AI Cube and smartphones, he said. “We need more time to build our AI (artificial intelligence) services … Later we will expand this outside of China.”

The CEO made clear that it will continue working in partnership with both Amazon and Google. However, any step outside China could put it in direct competition with the two U.S. tech giants, both of which have their voice assistants integrated with various hardware.

Amazon and Google were not immediately available for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, alexa, smartphones, google, voice, rival, huawei, using, amazon, working, ai, assistant, outside


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Chinese tech giant Huawei plans to introduce ‘augmented reality’ glasses in next one or two years

Huawei is working on augmented reality (AR) smart glasses which could debut in the next one or two years, potentially pitting it in a race against Apple, which is reportedly working on a similar product of its own. The Chinese technology giant already has augmented reality apps on its latest Mate 20 Pro smartphone. These would be wearable spectacles that allow people to experience AR. “With this AR, you can have AR glasses working with phone, maybe you can watch more of a large area,” Yu said. Y


Huawei is working on augmented reality (AR) smart glasses which could debut in the next one or two years, potentially pitting it in a race against Apple, which is reportedly working on a similar product of its own. The Chinese technology giant already has augmented reality apps on its latest Mate 20 Pro smartphone. These would be wearable spectacles that allow people to experience AR. “With this AR, you can have AR glasses working with phone, maybe you can watch more of a large area,” Yu said. Y
Chinese tech giant Huawei plans to introduce ‘augmented reality’ glasses in next one or two years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: arjun kharpal, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ar, users, introduce, technology, smartphone, working, glasses, experience, tech, plans, chinese, huawei, yu, giant, augmented, reality


Chinese tech giant Huawei plans to introduce 'augmented reality' glasses in next one or two years

Huawei is working on augmented reality (AR) smart glasses which could debut in the next one or two years, potentially pitting it in a race against Apple, which is reportedly working on a similar product of its own.

AR is a technology that sees virtual three-dimensional images overlaid onto the real world. It’s a similar principle as smartphone game apps that let users see digital objects through the screens on their phones that appear to be within the scene captured on their screen.

The Chinese technology giant already has augmented reality apps on its latest Mate 20 Pro smartphone.

But Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business, told CNBC in an exclusive interview that AR glasses are in the works which could take the experience to the next level. These would be wearable spectacles that allow people to experience AR.

“With this AR, you can have AR glasses working with phone, maybe you can watch more of a large area,” Yu said.

“In the beginning you may feel AR … is nothing. But in the future you will see more and more the value of that,” he added.

Yu said the company will bring more augmented reality experiences to the smartphone first, so users become accustomed to it before the company releases the glasses.

“The next one to two years I think the industry will commercialize, even for Huawei. We will bring a better user experience product,” Yu said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: arjun kharpal, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ar, users, introduce, technology, smartphone, working, glasses, experience, tech, plans, chinese, huawei, yu, giant, augmented, reality


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Kevin O’Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week

“You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever. You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses. “The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary sa


“You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever. You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses. “The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary sa
Kevin O’Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, working, week, oleary, shark, 25, thats, money, entrepreneur, going, start, day, hours, work, youre, tank, kevin, rich, days


Kevin O'Leary: If you want to get rich, start working 25 hours a day, 7 days a week

Everybody seems to be striving for work-life balance. But if you want to be an entrepreneur, especially one who’s rich and successful, that’s not an option — you have to be prepared to work very hard, says financial expert and star of ABC’s “Shark Tank” Kevin O’Leary.

“If I have to give one piece of advice to someone who’s thinking about starting a business, I tell them this: Forget about balance,” O’Leary tells CNBC’s Make It. “You’re going to work 25 hours a day, seven days a week, forever.

“That’s what it takes to be successful.”

You’re going to be competing with tons of determined people who “want to kick your ass. It’s a job 24-7,” he continues.

“Get over it, and get ready for it.”

O’Leary isn’t the only money mogul to recommend a rigorous work schedule. Self-made millionaire Grant Cardone has said that while most people work 9 to 5, he works 95 hours per week, and if you ever want to be a millionaire, you need to do the same.

For his part, O’Leary is an expert at hustle and hard work. He typically wakes up at around 4:30 a.m. and juggles his many ventures, from managing his “Shark Tank” investments to lecturing at universities to running a number of his own businesses.

When it comes to investing in other entrepreneurs, he doles hundreds of thousands of dollars on “Shark Tank” each season, but only when he’s convinced they’ll work extremely hard to be successful.

“The biggest myth of being an entrepreneur is that you’re going to get rich overnight,” O’Leary says. “It practically never happens. Most people slog it out for years, and sometimes even decades.”

Still, O’Leary also says that when it comes to entrepreneurship, money shouldn’t be the motivating factor. What should keep you going through those long weeks and rough patches is the pursuit of personal freedom. And that’s what you should focus on.

“It’s a long, hard journey, but it’s worth it,” O’Leary says. “It’s not about the greed of money, it’s about the pursuit of personal freedom. If you’re successful as an entrepreneur, you will set yourself free, and that’s worth fighting for.”

Don’t miss: Here’s the mental trick this introverted Duolingo exec uses to lead effectively

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: sarah berger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hard, working, week, oleary, shark, 25, thats, money, entrepreneur, going, start, day, hours, work, youre, tank, kevin, rich, days


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Iowa woman who won $688 million jackpot almost lost her winning ticket

4:42 PM ET Wed, 24 Oct 2018 | 01:40On Sunday, a friend informed West that the winning tickets had been sold in Iowa and New York. West called her sister, who found the tickets in her truck and sent her a picture of the numbers. She entered the numbers into the Powerball website, where winning numbers show up in red, and got a response of “red, red, red, red, red, red — jackpot.” West grew up in a working class family in Earlham, Iowa, which has a population of 1,450. When she had the extra money


4:42 PM ET Wed, 24 Oct 2018 | 01:40On Sunday, a friend informed West that the winning tickets had been sold in Iowa and New York. West called her sister, who found the tickets in her truck and sent her a picture of the numbers. She entered the numbers into the Powerball website, where winning numbers show up in red, and got a response of “red, red, red, red, red, red — jackpot.” West grew up in a working class family in Earlham, Iowa, which has a population of 1,450. When she had the extra money
Iowa woman who won $688 million jackpot almost lost her winning ticket Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: abigail hess, courtesy of the iowa lottery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, red, school, lottery, jackpot, west, working, won, 688, ticket, numbers, family, woman, million, iowa, money, tickets, daughters, lost, winning


Iowa woman who won $688 million jackpot almost lost her winning ticket

Kevin O’Leary knows exactly what to do if you win the lottery – but does America? 4:42 PM ET Wed, 24 Oct 2018 | 01:40

On Sunday, a friend informed West that the winning tickets had been sold in Iowa and New York. When she went to look for the tickets in her purse, they weren’t there. West called her sister, who found the tickets in her truck and sent her a picture of the numbers. She entered the numbers into the Powerball website, where winning numbers show up in red, and got a response of “red, red, red, red, red, red — jackpot.”

West says she told her sister, “Get that ticket, get in your truck and get up here now — and drive slow.'”

West grew up in a working class family in Earlham, Iowa, which has a population of 1,450. Her father was a Vietnam veteran and a welder and her mother was a stay-at-home mom.

“When I was 14, I started detasseling and walking beans so that I could earn money to buy my school clothes and to help with the family,” West said. “At the age of 17, I left high school. At the age of 19, I earned my GED. Soon after that, I started my family. I have three awesome, beautiful daughters. ”

She supported her daughters as a single mother by working full time and going to school at night and on the weekend. When she had the extra money, West would play the lottery. The most she had ever won, previously, was $150.

At first, West’s daughters didn’t believe her, but now that the reality of her good fortune has sunk in, she and her family are determined to use the winnings responsibly. West had worked for a health insurance company, but she retired after learning she’d won the lottery. She plans to buy herself a car to replace her Ford Fiesta, which has 142,000 miles on it.

She says she’ll give to friends and family, and set money aside for her grandchildren to go to college. She has also established The Callum Foundation, which is named after her late grandson who was born prematurely. According to the organization’s website, The Callum Foundation provides grants to individuals and organizations in order to address issues such as “poverty and hunger, education, animal welfare and veteran affairs.”

“I want you to know that as I stand here today I know the responsibility that I have to do good with this money,” she said, fighting back tears. “My life is changed forever.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-14  Authors: abigail hess, courtesy of the iowa lottery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, red, school, lottery, jackpot, west, working, won, 688, ticket, numbers, family, woman, million, iowa, money, tickets, daughters, lost, winning


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Macy’s is testing smaller stores to save money

Macy’s is testing smaller stores to slash expenses on staffing and inventory, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal. Not needing so many locations — and with some being unprofitable — Macy’s in early 2017 shut 100 stores as it’s been working to whittle down its real estate. Macy’s had roughly 690 locations, including those under the Bloomingdale’s banner, still open as of the latest quarter. Macy’s “neighborhood stores” will reportedly have more self-service options and an area dedica


Macy’s is testing smaller stores to slash expenses on staffing and inventory, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal. Not needing so many locations — and with some being unprofitable — Macy’s in early 2017 shut 100 stores as it’s been working to whittle down its real estate. Macy’s had roughly 690 locations, including those under the Bloomingdale’s banner, still open as of the latest quarter. Macy’s “neighborhood stores” will reportedly have more self-service options and an area dedica
Macy’s is testing smaller stores to save money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: lauren thomas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nordstrom, save, estate, macys, space, testing, locations, stores, including, money, working, store, real, smaller


Macy's is testing smaller stores to save money

Macy’s is testing smaller stores to slash expenses on staffing and inventory, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.

The department store chain currently is trying the idea at four locations, including at Stamford Town Center in Connecticut, to cut its real estate by as much as a fifth there and turn those shops into “neighborhood stores.” It mimics similar initiatives already taken by rivals Kohl’s and Nordstrom. Kohl’s is dividing some of its bigger stores to allow room for new tenants like grocer Aldi, while Nordstrom is trying a small-shop concept known as Nordstrom Local in Los Angeles. Even mall operators like Macerich are looking at store space in a new way, rolling out stores that showcase a number of brands for a short period.

“If your store is too big and your dollars per square feet are too low and you can’t lease the space to someone else, then you’ve got to hive off a floor,” Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette told the Journal in an interview. “If we were building stores today, we’d build them smaller.”

Not needing so many locations — and with some being unprofitable — Macy’s in early 2017 shut 100 stores as it’s been working to whittle down its real estate. It’s also been working with Brookfield Asset Management to allow the real estate firm to redevelop all or part of 50 select properties. Macy’s had roughly 690 locations, including those under the Bloomingdale’s banner, still open as of the latest quarter.

Macy’s “neighborhood stores” will reportedly have more self-service options and an area dedicated to picking up online orders. It’s unclear what Macy’s will do with the space leftover after the store shrinks in size. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Macy’s, meanwhile, has set aside about 350 of its more productive stores to get a facelift, including expanded merchandise, remodeled dressing rooms, Starbucks coffee shops, couches for lounging and more, Gennette told the Journal. He said sales at these newly renovated “magnet stores” are surpassing expectations already.

Macy’s is set to report fiscal third-quarter earnings before the bell on Wednesday, when it is planning to discuss its real estate strategy in greater detail.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: lauren thomas, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nordstrom, save, estate, macys, space, testing, locations, stores, including, money, working, store, real, smaller


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Here’s the budget breakdown of a 34-year-old who makes $150,000 and is excellent with money

What Ilieva makes each year varies but, in a typical year she brings in between $80,000 and $150,000, primarily as a brand consultant. She runs her own marketing agency, DLA, An Agency, which specializes in brand and business development for food and beverage companies. Ilieva started the business with the contacts she made during her time working for Patron right after college and built it out from there. She started her agency eight years ago and, after a layoff in 2016, decided to pursue the


What Ilieva makes each year varies but, in a typical year she brings in between $80,000 and $150,000, primarily as a brand consultant. She runs her own marketing agency, DLA, An Agency, which specializes in brand and business development for food and beverage companies. Ilieva started the business with the contacts she made during her time working for Patron right after college and built it out from there. She started her agency eight years ago and, after a layoff in 2016, decided to pursue the
Here’s the budget breakdown of a 34-year-old who makes $150,000 and is excellent with money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: emmie martin, cnbc make it, source, pamela capalad, -dijana ilieva
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brand, agency, family, ilieva, business, working, 34yearold, 150000, heres, started, budget, breakdown, college, worth, makes, yugoslavia, money, excellent


Here's the budget breakdown of a 34-year-old who makes $150,000 and is excellent with money

What Ilieva makes each year varies but, in a typical year she brings in between $80,000 and $150,000, primarily as a brand consultant. She runs her own marketing agency, DLA, An Agency, which specializes in brand and business development for food and beverage companies. Ilieva started the business with the contacts she made during her time working for Patron right after college and built it out from there.

Although Ilieva has held numerous corporate jobs since she graduated from De Anza College in Cupertino, California, she has developed extracurricular projects as well. “I’ve always been building my network on the side because you never know what can happen nowadays,” she says. “It’s always good to have something to fall back on.”

She started her agency eight years ago and, after a layoff in 2016, decided to pursue the business full-time.

Hard work is in her nature. She was born in what used to be Yugoslavia and moved to the U.S. with her mother’s family when she was four. Once there, she and her mother lived in a one-bedroom apartment in Brooklyn with two other families’ worth of relatives for over a decade. “My experience with money was seeing my family hustle,” she says. “They were locksmiths and everyone was pooling money.”

That mindset still affects how she looks at her finances today. “Every dollar I spend, I think of how I can make three dollars to cover it,” she says. “I buy a purse for $200 and I’m like, ‘Where am I going to make $500 tomorrow?'”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: emmie martin, cnbc make it, source, pamela capalad, -dijana ilieva
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brand, agency, family, ilieva, business, working, 34yearold, 150000, heres, started, budget, breakdown, college, worth, makes, yugoslavia, money, excellent


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Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement

“So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.” The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds. The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their be


“So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.” The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds. The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their be
Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weeks, working, summer, justin, travel, best, couple, going, early, retirement, vacation, work, share, 30s, quit, think


Couple who quit in their 30s share the best part of early retirement

The McCurrys, who have three kids, also have more time to travel. “Every summer we take usually a month or two to go on vacation somewhere internationally, like the Bahamas, Mexico, Europe — this coming summer we’re going to Southeast Asia for eight weeks,” says Justin. “So it’s a big shift from the normal vacation of one or two weeks for most working people.”

The freedom of not working makes it easier to jump on good airline deals and keep travel costs low, Kaisorn adds.

The hardest part about settling down early might be adjusting to less structure and more alone time. “Work keeps you busy, so you’re not sitting around at home thinking, How do I fill my days?” Justin says. You may no longer have as much regular contact with your peers, and that can be an adjustment, too: “I think the social aspect is an area that people sort of overlook when they’re going into regular retirement or early retirement. How are they going to get out and meet people? How are they going to stay busy and stay active?”

Still, he and Kaisorn are very glad they made the choice they did. “In terms of the constraints on lifestyle and requirements to show up every day at 8 a.m. and do things and be on a schedule and have deadlines, I definitely don’t miss it at all,” he says.

Overall, retiring early “was pretty great five years ago and it’s still really great now,” says Justin. “We’re sitting on the couch or outside walking around or going shopping in the middle of the day on a Tuesday. I still get a smile on my face when I sit back and think, Oh, this is our hard work — we put this together and now it’s really working out for us.”

Don’t miss: This couple who retired in their 30s with over $1 million are living their best lives

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, source, mccurry family
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weeks, working, summer, justin, travel, best, couple, going, early, retirement, vacation, work, share, 30s, quit, think


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