Big California insurer is ditching ‘zombie’ workplace wellness programs and focusing on digital health apps

But studies are finding that most traditional workplace wellness programs do not work, and large employers aren’t reporting a reduction in their health-related spending, which is now at a record high. For Williams, that suggests that the health plans need to go back to the drawing board. Williams said that his team selected about 70 digital health apps from more than 300,000 that are available on the Apple App Store alone. That way, suggests Williams, “the best tools that our members really like


But studies are finding that most traditional workplace wellness programs do not work, and large employers aren’t reporting a reduction in their health-related spending, which is now at a record high. For Williams, that suggests that the health plans need to go back to the drawing board. Williams said that his team selected about 70 digital health apps from more than 300,000 that are available on the Apple App Store alone. That way, suggests Williams, “the best tools that our members really like
Big California insurer is ditching ‘zombie’ workplace wellness programs and focusing on digital health apps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, digital, programs, members, apps, workplace, dont, health, california, williams, zombie, wellness, app, way, insurer, focusing, suggests, ditching


Big California insurer is ditching 'zombie' workplace wellness programs and focusing on digital health apps

Companies have embraced health surveys, biometric screenings and other wellness offerings, as a way to keep employees healthy and lower their overall medical costs.

But studies are finding that most traditional workplace wellness programs do not work, and large employers aren’t reporting a reduction in their health-related spending, which is now at a record high.

One of California’s largest health insurers has had enough.

Blue Shield of California’s Bryce Williams, who’s responsible for the plan’s lifestyle initiatives, feels that these programs are “zombies” that should be phased out.

For Williams, that suggests that the health plans need to go back to the drawing board. “When something is not working, and it’s expensive and not delivering results, we need to do something different,” he said.

In his view, these programs struggle because they don’t often align with the latest medical research. and the rewards are “insignificant,” while the penalties, which typically take the form of increased premiums, “don’t make anyone feel good.”

So the plan, which serves more than 4 million people across California, is rolling out a new offering called “Wellvolution” in across its employer customers, as well as its Medicare and Medicaid members in California. The idea is to provide members with a curated range of offerings from consumer-friendly digital health start-ups, including apps for stress management, smoking cessation and sleep quality, as well as in-person resources like gym memberships and Weight Watchers classes.

Williams said that his team selected about 70 digital health apps from more than 300,000 that are available on the Apple App Store alone. They spent the bulk of their time vetting the apps that purported to manage a disease, like diabetes or heart disease, to ensure that they had clinical evidence to backup their claims.

According to Williams, there’s an online portal for members to login via a mobile app or the web. Members will then be asked to answer some basic survey questions about their health goals. From there, they’ll get a recommendation for an app or a service they can use as a wellness perk. If they don’t like it, they can change it up at any time.

That way, suggests Williams, “the best tools that our members really like can rise to the top.”

The insurer teamed up with a health-tech start-up called Solera Health to develop the service. Solera specializes in developing technology that can match individuals with wellness programs and other health services that best meet their needs.

Follow @CNBCTech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.

WATCH: Your physical exam just got a high-tech upgrade


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-25  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, digital, programs, members, apps, workplace, dont, health, california, williams, zombie, wellness, app, way, insurer, focusing, suggests, ditching


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53% of LGBTQ employees have faced or witnessed verbal discrimination at work

June is LGBTQ pride month, which commemorates the Stonewall riots that took place in New York City on June 28th, 1969. As part of its 2019 LGBTQ Workplace Survey, Glassdoor surveyed 6,104 U.S. adults about the treatment of LGBTQ employees at work, and found that while much may have changed for LGBTQ Americans in the 50 years since Stonewall, 53% of LGBTQ employees still say they have “experienced or witnessed anti-LGBTQ comments by co-workers.” What constitutes anti-LGBTQ comments can vary great


June is LGBTQ pride month, which commemorates the Stonewall riots that took place in New York City on June 28th, 1969. As part of its 2019 LGBTQ Workplace Survey, Glassdoor surveyed 6,104 U.S. adults about the treatment of LGBTQ employees at work, and found that while much may have changed for LGBTQ Americans in the 50 years since Stonewall, 53% of LGBTQ employees still say they have “experienced or witnessed anti-LGBTQ comments by co-workers.” What constitutes anti-LGBTQ comments can vary great
53% of LGBTQ employees have faced or witnessed verbal discrimination at work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, discrimination, verbal, witnessed, faced, dobroski, support, employees, dont, thats, glassdoor, workplace, lgbtq, work, 53


53% of LGBTQ employees have faced or witnessed verbal discrimination at work

June is LGBTQ pride month, which commemorates the Stonewall riots that took place in New York City on June 28th, 1969. As part of its 2019 LGBTQ Workplace Survey, Glassdoor surveyed 6,104 U.S. adults about the treatment of LGBTQ employees at work, and found that while much may have changed for LGBTQ Americans in the 50 years since Stonewall, 53% of LGBTQ employees still say they have “experienced or witnessed anti-LGBTQ comments by co-workers.” Roughly 30% of their non-LGBTQ co-workers reported witnessing these kinds of events. What constitutes anti-LGBTQ comments can vary greatly from remarks like “that’s so gay” to “I don’t support same-sex marriage.”

FG Trade | Getty Images

A diverse workforce is actually going to lead to greater productivity, creativity and innovation. Scott Dobroski Senior Director of Corporate Communications, Glassdoor

“Should everyone come out at work? The answer still is, ‘It depends,'” says Dobroski. “While we advocate and want everyone to bring their full selves to work and be comfortable, if someone feels it may not be safe in their workplace or they could face some discrimination, then it may not, unfortunately, be right at the current time for them to come out. “However, we would also say then if that’s the case, there are a lot of employers out there who do want you to bring their full selves to work, so the grass may be greener elsewhere.” Approximately 70% of LGBTQ employees surveyed by Glassdoor said that they would not apply to work at a company if it did not support its LGBTQ employees, and 46% of all workers (both LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ) said the same. That support can include offering LGBTQ benefits, creating employee network groups and donating to LGBTQ causes. Glassdoor found that companies that do not provide this type of employee support often end up creating environments where workers feel it is not okay to be out at work. To make sure they don’t miss out on qualified talent, Dobroski says employers should “embrace diversity and inclusion and promoting their policies and practices — and that doesn’t mean just marching in a parade or changing, your social [media] icons to a rainbow for one month.” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how

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The 10 US cities where college grads are the most burdened by student debt


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, discrimination, verbal, witnessed, faced, dobroski, support, employees, dont, thats, glassdoor, workplace, lgbtq, work, 53


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Companies are making it harder for you to leave your 401(k)

To save, or not to save? A growing number of companies now direct money from their employees’ paychecks to a retirement account — even after a worker has said “no, thanks.” Auto-enrollment into retirement plans, of course, is not new. The results have been powerful: More than 90% of employees participate in automatic-enrollment plans, compared with less than 60% in voluntary plans. (The most common default savings rate is 3% of a worker’s salary.)


To save, or not to save? A growing number of companies now direct money from their employees’ paychecks to a retirement account — even after a worker has said “no, thanks.” Auto-enrollment into retirement plans, of course, is not new. The results have been powerful: More than 90% of employees participate in automatic-enrollment plans, compared with less than 60% in voluntary plans. (The most common default savings rate is 3% of a worker’s salary.)
Companies are making it harder for you to leave your 401(k) Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, company, harder, 401k, employers, plans, worker, workplace, companies, leave, making, wear, save, workers, retirement


Companies are making it harder for you to leave your 401(k)

To save, or not to save? That question might not be yours to answer.

A growing number of companies now direct money from their employees’ paychecks to a retirement account — even after a worker has said “no, thanks.”

Auto-enrollment into retirement plans, of course, is not new. The practice has taken off in the workplace since President George W. Bush signed the Pension Protection Act in 2006, which said employers don’t need their workers’ permission to sign them up for the company retirement plan.

The results have been powerful: More than 90% of employees participate in automatic-enrollment plans, compared with less than 60% in voluntary plans. (The most common default savings rate is 3% of a worker’s salary.)

But while many employers auto-enroll their employees one time — typically when they first join the company — some are now doing so again and again, hoping to wear down those prone to ditching.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, company, harder, 401k, employers, plans, worker, workplace, companies, leave, making, wear, save, workers, retirement


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Getting to know the ‘right’ people is key to getting the right salary

Caiaimage/Tom Merton | Caiaimage | Getty ImagesThe people you know — and what they know about you — can be the key to landing a job, advancing in the workplace and getting paid what you are worth. There are ways to discuss who you are and what you should be earning with the “right” people. Be open and approachable with peersYour colleagues want to know who you are and why you do what you do. Suzy Welch career expertAlso, network with a purpose. Get time on the calendar to let your boss know what


Caiaimage/Tom Merton | Caiaimage | Getty ImagesThe people you know — and what they know about you — can be the key to landing a job, advancing in the workplace and getting paid what you are worth. There are ways to discuss who you are and what you should be earning with the “right” people. Be open and approachable with peersYour colleagues want to know who you are and why you do what you do. Suzy Welch career expertAlso, network with a purpose. Get time on the calendar to let your boss know what
Getting to know the ‘right’ people is key to getting the right salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-02  Authors: sharon epperson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boss, workplace, key, getting, youre, know, worth, organization, career, dont, welch, salary, right, pay


Getting to know the 'right' people is key to getting the right salary

Caiaimage/Tom Merton | Caiaimage | Getty Images

The people you know — and what they know about you — can be the key to landing a job, advancing in the workplace and getting paid what you are worth. Talking about your pay in the workplace is sometimes seen as taboo, but not always. There are ways to discuss who you are and what you should be earning with the “right” people. Here are three tips for approaching that “money talk. ”

Be open and approachable with peers

Your colleagues want to know who you are and why you do what you do. Yet you don’t have to overshare or gossip. This is especially important for those just starting out in their careers to remember because relationships can follow you everywhere, said career expert Caroline Ceniza-Levine, co-founder of SixFigureStart. “The thing people forget is communication is a two-way street,” she said, “and what feels comfortable to you is not what everyone around you is comfortable with or prefers.” Be clear, direct and honest about your strengths, as well as challenges and how you intend to overcome them. Your peers are more likely to share their own experiences — including, perhaps, what they have earned — if they trust that you will do the same with them.

Build and grow your professional network

Peers that you collaborate with at your organization as well as associates at your professional level in other companies can be great resources. Where you live and work may also factor into how robust the opportunities are for networking, according to a survey released earlier this year by tech resource site Tech.co. Using the most networking events, best average salaries, and a few others factors, tech mecca San Francisco topped that list.

Every time you don’t play well with others and your boss has to apologize for you, explain your behavior, or advocate for you, you are depleting it. Suzy Welch career expert

Also, network with a purpose. You want to identify and build trust with peers and leaders who are high achievers and have a good reputation. Get together regularly, one on one or in small groups, to talk about negotiating pay raises and perks.

Be proactive in your relationship with your boss

Set up monthly or quarterly meetings with your supervisor. Don’t wait for your boss to reach out to you. Get time on the calendar to let your boss know what you’re working on. More from Invest in You:

If you’re Gen Z or millennial and want to be rich someday, you need to do this

Not knowing your worth could result in settling for less. Take our quiz

Use those regular meetings to find out what he or she expects of you and thinks of the job that you’re doing. Your boss is likely busy juggling a lot of competing interests, so make sure you’re high on that list, especially when the time comes to negotiate for higher pay or more perks. Also, consider how your actions within the organization may reflect on your boss, says career expert and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch. “Your boss has a certain amount of goodwill in the organization,” she recently told CNBC Make It. “Every time you don’t play well with others and your boss has to apologize for you, explain your behavior, or advocate for you, you are depleting it.”

The bottom line


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-02  Authors: sharon epperson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boss, workplace, key, getting, youre, know, worth, organization, career, dont, welch, salary, right, pay


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The World Health Organization officially recognizes workplace ‘burnout’ as an occupational phenomenon

If you often feel exhausted or mentally distant at work, the World Health Organization may have a diagnosis for you: Burnout. For the first time, the WHO has officially classified workplace burnout as an occupational phenomenon in its latest revision of the International Classification of Diseases. “Burnout is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed,” the WHO said Tuesday. Schawbel said burnout has become a problem as employees


If you often feel exhausted or mentally distant at work, the World Health Organization may have a diagnosis for you: Burnout. For the first time, the WHO has officially classified workplace burnout as an occupational phenomenon in its latest revision of the International Classification of Diseases. “Burnout is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed,” the WHO said Tuesday. Schawbel said burnout has become a problem as employees
The World Health Organization officially recognizes workplace ‘burnout’ as an occupational phenomenon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, occupational, phenomenon, diseases, organization, workplace, recognizes, health, vacation, burnout, world, schawbel, employees, classification, syndrome, officially, work


The World Health Organization officially recognizes workplace 'burnout' as an occupational phenomenon

If you often feel exhausted or mentally distant at work, the World Health Organization may have a diagnosis for you: Burnout.

For the first time, the WHO has officially classified workplace burnout as an occupational phenomenon in its latest revision of the International Classification of Diseases. The agency previously defined burnout as a “state of vital exhaustion,” but this is the first time it’s being directly linked in its classification of diseases as a work hazard.

“Burnout is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed,” the WHO said Tuesday. “Burnout refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life.”

The organization said burnout, which the WHO does not call a medical condition, is classified by three factors:

feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;

increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job;

and reduced professional efficacy.

Burnout is included as a cause for which people may contact health services for a reason other than an illness or health condition. Some even fault the syndrome for pushing employees in the medical profession to commit suicide due to intense stress.

The syndrome is now an “epidemic,” according to Dan Schawbel, research director at HR advisory firm Future Workplace — and he expects the issue to worsen.

“Basically, workers are getting taken advantage of,” Schawbel said. “As a result, people are burned out, they’re stressed out.”

Schawbel said burnout has become a problem as employees work more and feel they’re not being fairly compensated. Though Americans on average get 10 days of vacation, Schawbel said employees are often pressured into skipping vacation days. He added that technology also plays a role in the rise of burnout because employees often have to respond to emails or calls outside of normal work hours.

“Not having your phone is the new vacation,” Schawbel said.

Burnout doesn’t just negatively affect workers, either. Schawbel pointed to a 2017 study that says 95% of human resource leaders say the syndrome sabotages workplace retention. The WHO also noted that burnout prevents professional success.

Schawbel said companies don’t have an incentive to change workplace environments that cause burnout. He said stronger laws and more labor unions would help protect workers.

The WHO said it plans to develop “evidence-based” guidelines for mental well-being in the workplace. Its member nations are set to implement the revisions to the International Classification of Diseases by 2022.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, occupational, phenomenon, diseases, organization, workplace, recognizes, health, vacation, burnout, world, schawbel, employees, classification, syndrome, officially, work


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Stop complaining—it’s making you dumber. Here’s what successful people do instead

In restaurants, being served by someone brings out the worst in most people: “The soup is too cold.” The real cesspool of constant complaining, however, is in the workplace, where whispers at the water cooler spread negativity like the plague. No whining in the workplaceI actually welcome complainers in the workplace — with one important caveat: The complaints need to be constructive. In other words, if you’re not bringing important issues — accompanied by a solution or additional insight — out


In restaurants, being served by someone brings out the worst in most people: “The soup is too cold.” The real cesspool of constant complaining, however, is in the workplace, where whispers at the water cooler spread negativity like the plague. No whining in the workplaceI actually welcome complainers in the workplace — with one important caveat: The complaints need to be constructive. In other words, if you’re not bringing important issues — accompanied by a solution or additional insight — out
Stop complaining—it’s making you dumber. Here’s what successful people do instead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whining, complainingits, dumber, workplace, youre, successful, restaurants, statement, positive, stop, sandwich, negativity, heres, worst, complaint, instead, making


Stop complaining—it's making you dumber. Here's what successful people do instead

Airplanes, restaurants, the office…these are just a few of the worst places for spawning complainers. In the air, it comes from being strapped to a tiny seat next to strangers at 35,000 feet — plus delays, lost luggage and the toenail-clipper sitting next to you. In restaurants, being served by someone brings out the worst in most people: “The soup is too cold.” “Are you sure it’s vegan?” “What’s taking so long?” The real cesspool of constant complaining, however, is in the workplace, where whispers at the water cooler spread negativity like the plague.

Stress from negativity shrinks your brain

A 1996 Stanford study suggests it’s time to stop. Complaining, or even being complained to, for 30 minutes or more can physically damage the brain. Researchers used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and found “links between long-term stressful life experiences, long-term exposure to hormones produced during stress, and shrinking of the hippocampus,” the study’s authors wrote. (The hippocampus is the region of the brain involved in the formation of new memories and is also associated with learning and emotions.) The worst part is that the average person complains between 15 to 30 times a day, according to Will Bowen, best-selling author of “A Complaint-Free World.”

No whining in the workplace

I actually welcome complainers in the workplace — with one important caveat: The complaints need to be constructive. In other words, if you’re not bringing important issues — accompanied by a solution or additional insight — out in the open, then you’re just whining. Here are four ways to be a constructive complainer: 1. Package your complaint like a sandwich “Woe is me” has never won any friends. But positivity brings out the best in those around you. The complaint sandwich starts with a positive statement, followed by the complaint, and then closes with another positive statement. Here’s an example: “I’ve heard great things about your service and I’m excited to try it. But I’ve had a difficult time reaching my account manager for immediate solutions. I’d really like to continue using your services. Is there anything you can do to help?”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whining, complainingits, dumber, workplace, youre, successful, restaurants, statement, positive, stop, sandwich, negativity, heres, worst, complaint, instead, making


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6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person

If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’


If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers. You avoid context-switchingContext-switching is when you stop what you’
6 signs you’re way more productive than the average person Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


6 signs you're way more productive than the average person

On a scale of one to 10, how would you rate your level of productivity? If you consider yourself to be someone who is easily overwhelmed with work, you’re in good company. In the current “always on” work culture, even the most productive people feel like they don’t accomplish much on a daily. And that’s understandable, especially with all of the everyday office distractions. A 2018 study from the workplace learning platform Udemy revealed the biggest workplace distractions that harm employee productivity. The team collected data from more than 1,000 working Americans (ages 18 or older) and found that the biggest distractions and productivity killers were colleague interruptions (80%), office noise (70%) and smartphones (65%). The good news is that you might be more skilled at managing your time than you realize. If you identify with any of the tendencies below, be assured that you’re a lot more productive than your peers.

1. You have a strategy for dealing with offline interruptions

Interruptions from colleagues and general office noise (i.e. printers, phones and outside sirens) were cited as the top two causes of workplace disruptions, according to the Udemy study. If you’ve developed strategies for how to deal with this, you’re already ahead of the game. These might range from wearing noise-canceling headphones to making it a habit to step outside once or twice a day to reset your focus. It also helps to have places in mind where you can retreat to if the interruptions become too unbearable. This might be a home office, coffee shop, library or even a private meeting room in your office that you can book. The most productive people also know how to set boundaries with their colleagues and aren’t afraid to say things like, “Sorry, I’m in the middle of something right now. Can I get back to you later?”

2. You’re rarely surprised by how fast time has gone by

Have you ever had to look something up on Google Maps for work only to find yourself, 20 minutes later, with a dozen browser tabs open as you try in vain to find the best pizza spot in town? It happens to the best of us. Productive people keep track of time — not in an obsessive way, but they often monitor how long they’re spending on a certain task to see if they need to speed up or start wrapping up and moving on to the next project.

We’re all human, so we have a tendency to procrastinate at every chance we get, but there are many helpful tools out there to help us manage every minute of our day, including website blockers that disable access to distracting websites.

3. You limit your communication channels

These days, there are more than enough ways in which anyone can get in contact with us at any time. From phone calls to text messages, emails to Slack notifications and Twitter DMs to Instagram comments, that’s a lot to stay on top of. The key to not letting all these communication channels distract you is to simply limit your access to them. If you’re the type to get frustrated with never-ending Slack notifications and prefer to do work communication over email, there’s no shame in being direct with your colleagues. In fact, most of them will appreciate your candidness. No one likes to sit around waiting and wondering why you haven’t responded to the Slack message they sent two hours ago.

4. You prioritize your daily, and weekly tasks

In his book, “Deep Work: Rules for Staying Focused Success in a Distracted World,” Cal Newport, an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University, notes that most people simply don’t know how to prioritize efficiently. On either Sunday night or Monday morning, review your tasks for the week ahead and see if the timeline makes sense. If one task is more important and may take you longer to complete, consider moving it to an earlier day in the week. Then, repeat the process at the end of each workday. Keep in mind that urgent requests may come up, and a task you thought would take just a half hour could end up taking three.

5. You avoid context-switching

Context-switching is when you stop what you’re working on to check your email or text messages for just a few minutes, then get back to what you were previously working on. This tendency can be a threat to your productivity: Each time you switch from one thing to another (before making progress on either), you experience a “transaction cost,” which drains your energy and slows you down.

6. You get enough sleep


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: benjamin spall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, average, distractions, productive, person, workplace, work, slack, office, signs, youre, productivity, working, task, way


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Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected

The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job. Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.” Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discriminatio


The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job. Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.” Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discriminatio
Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, klaus tiedge blend images, getty images, -shannon liss-riordan, boston-based employment lawyer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fastestgrowing, workplace, supreme, older, employment, discrimination, protected, pool, labor, workers, age, employees, way, study


Older workers are fastest-growing labor pool, and the least protected

The fastest-growing segment of the American workforce is employees age 65 and older. The reasons are many. Over the past decade, real wage growth has stagnated, pensions have disappeared, workers are delaying claiming Social Security benefits to maximize payouts, and lifespans are longer, leaving seniors worried they will burn through their retirement savings way too soon.

According to a Gallup 2018 survey of 1,015 adults age 18 and older across the United States, 41 percent of participants who are not retired plan to leave the job market at age 66 or older, a figure that has risen from 12 percent in the 1995 study and 26 percent in 2004. This number will likely keep growing.

Yet this hasn’t changed the way most companies talk about their hiring priorities.

Many firms today focus more intently on how to recruit and retain millennials, and they base success on the percentage of their workers that now come from this younger generation.

Some job postings mention a “maximum number of years experience” or use a date-of-birth dropdown menu without an applicant’s birth year listed. Words like “overqualified” can be code for too expensive. A corporate culture described as “fun” can suggest a workplace for the young. It is difficult for older workers to master the difficult interview process, and make discrimination claims once in a job.

Older workers are encountering widespread age discrimination, according to AARP. According to its 2018 Multicultural Work and Jobs Study, 61 percent of respondents over the age of 45 reported seeing or experiencing age-based discrimination in the workplace. What’s more, senior workers are in a weakened position when it comes to a crucial workplace protection based on a recent Supreme Court decision and the legal safeguards that shield against wrongful termination or demotion, like claims covered under the Civil Rights Act.

“It’s an open secret, and everyone knows it happens all the time, but few people stand up and say it’s wrong,” said Cathy Ventrell-Monsees, a senior attorney at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. “When it comes to age discrimination — stereotyping and comments — they seem too common.”

Applicants and employees age 40 and older are protected from age discrimination in employment under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, or ADEA, which was created in 1967 as an extension of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which doesn’t cover age discrimination.

A 2009 Supreme Court ruling in “Gross v. FBL Financial Services, Inc.,” however, set a higher bar for employees to prove that age was the deciding factor in an age discrimination claim that wasn’t applied similarly to race, color, religion, sex or national origin.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: noah higgins-dunn, klaus tiedge blend images, getty images, -shannon liss-riordan, boston-based employment lawyer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fastestgrowing, workplace, supreme, older, employment, discrimination, protected, pool, labor, workers, age, employees, way, study


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Here’s how to get other people to pay off your student debt

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans 10:50 AM ET Mon, 15 Oct 2018 | 01:23As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it. A new federal program offers up to $75,000 in student loan relief for those who work for three years in the health-care field, battling the opioid epidemic. South Korean automaker Hyundai announced this month that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from the company. Meanwhile, student loan assistance, which started as


3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans 10:50 AM ET Mon, 15 Oct 2018 | 01:23As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it. A new federal program offers up to $75,000 in student loan relief for those who work for three years in the health-care field, battling the opioid epidemic. South Korean automaker Hyundai announced this month that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from the company. Meanwhile, student loan assistance, which started as
Here’s how to get other people to pay off your student debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: annie nova, wang zhao, afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, debt, way, started, loan, workplace, work, pay, student, sleeves, heres, squelch


Here's how to get other people to pay off your student debt

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans 10:50 AM ET Mon, 15 Oct 2018 | 01:23

As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it.

A new federal program offers up to $75,000 in student loan relief for those who work for three years in the health-care field, battling the opioid epidemic.

South Korean automaker Hyundai announced this month that it will give $900 to people with student debt who buy or lease a car from the company. The offer is only available at dealerships in California and Phoenix right now.

Meanwhile, student loan assistance, which started as a niche offering by a handful of companies, is finding its way into the mainstream menu of workplace benefits.

Some of the other ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt.

Other ways of garnering money to eliminate your education debt don’t rely on luck, but rather require rolling up your sleeves or knowing historical facts.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: annie nova, wang zhao, afp getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ways, debt, way, started, loan, workplace, work, pay, student, sleeves, heres, squelch


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