Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?


Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story?
Ray Dalio’s Beatles-inspired routine for success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


Ray Dalio's Beatles-inspired routine for success

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio is widely considered a rock star of the investing world. But the source of his success has a lot to do with superstars of another sort: The Beatles. Dalio was in his early twenties when he was inspired by the famous foursome to take up a new skill: Meditation. Today, half a century on, it remains a constant of his daily routine, and one to which he attributes his greatest career wins.

Ray Dalio, founder of investment firm Bridgewater Associates. J. Countess | Getty Images

“It was life changing,” Dalio, now 70, told CNBC’s Christine Tan in a recent episode of “Managing Asia.” The English rock band popularized a silent form of meditation — known as Transcendental Meditation — in 1968, following a two-month trip to India. The practice, developed by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, involves the use of a mantra, such as “OM,” to reach a state of subconsciousness. Dalio, over the course of his five-decade career, has practiced the technique twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, for 20 minutes each.

It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. Ray Dalio founder of Bridgewater Associates

That has helped him cope with the ups and downs of running the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, the company he founded in 1975, he said. That includes the near-collapse of the business in 1982 when Dalio mistakenly bet on the next financial downturn — a moment he has described as “painfully humbling.” “It works because it brings you into your subconscious mind and it gives one an equanimity. In other words, a centered-ness, a calm centered-ness in the middle of a storm,” Dalio explained. The practice also provides an opportunity for creative thinking away from life’s daily distractions, which Dalio said has been vital for his personal development. “It’s like if you take a hot shower and the ideas come to you,” he said. “That ability to reflect well and to be above those things that you’re operating so you can navigate them well is a real great thing to have.” Don’t miss: Billionaire Ray Dalio says this is how to be ‘truly successful’ Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, routine, bridgewater, meditation, mind, practice, beatlesinspired, works, dalios, subconscious, success, dalio, hedge, rock, ray


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The books on Barack Obama’s 2019 summer reading list

If you’re looking for a few more good beach reads to carry you through the final weeks of summer, then Barack Obama has you covered with several suggestions. The former president posted a list of the books he’s been reading this summer on social media on Wednesday, and it’s highlighted by the works of the recently departed Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison. “To start, you can’t go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison,” Obama wrote in a post he shared on Face


If you’re looking for a few more good beach reads to carry you through the final weeks of summer, then Barack Obama has you covered with several suggestions. The former president posted a list of the books he’s been reading this summer on social media on Wednesday, and it’s highlighted by the works of the recently departed Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison. “To start, you can’t go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison,” Obama wrote in a post he shared on Face
The books on Barack Obama’s 2019 summer reading list Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, 2019, obamas, morrison, works, wrote, toni, instagram, president, obama, barack, books, list, reading


The books on Barack Obama's 2019 summer reading list

If you’re looking for a few more good beach reads to carry you through the final weeks of summer, then Barack Obama has you covered with several suggestions.

The former president posted a list of the books he’s been reading this summer on social media on Wednesday, and it’s highlighted by the works of the recently departed Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison.

“To start, you can’t go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison,” Obama wrote in a post he shared on Facebook and Instagram. Morrison, who died on Aug. 5 at the age of 88, wrote several acclaimed novels, including “The Bluest Eye,” “Song of Solomon,” and “Beloved.”

“They’re transcendent, all of them. You’ll be glad you read them,” Obama wrote of Morrison’s work. In 2012, while he was still in office, Obama presented Morrison with the Presidential Medal of Freedom

But, the former president also had 10 additional books and short stories to recommend to his tens of millions of followers across both Facebook and Instagram. Here are Obama’s recommended books for summer reading:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, 2019, obamas, morrison, works, wrote, toni, instagram, president, obama, barack, books, list, reading


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This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no


Mette LykkeBuilding a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and no
This woman sold her app for $85 million — here’s the common mistake she sees in start-ups Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


This woman sold her app for $85 million — here's the common mistake she sees in start-ups

Mette Lykke

Building a high-value business takes patience and entrepreneurs shouldn’t believe that start-ups reach multi-million-dollar valuations overnight, a successful Danish businesswoman has warned. When it comes to growing a start-up, Mette Lykke, CEO of food waste organization Too Good To Go, speaks from experience. She co-founded fitness app Endomondo in 2007, developing the company for almost a decade before it gained enough interest to be acquired by American firm Under Armour. Endomondo was sold to the U.S. athleticwear brand in 2015 for $85 million, and Lykke stayed on as its CEO until 2017.

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According to Lykke, who began her career as a management consultant, a business can only experience vast growth rates if the people at its reins exercise what she calls “patient impatience.” “Every day you have to push (yourself) and you have to be willing to do that for quite a while,” she said. “I think a lot of stories about start-ups give the impression that two guys start a company in a basement and boom, two years later they change the world. That’s just not how it works – it takes years, so working hard every day is crucial.”

Be clear on your purpose

For the past two years, Lykke has been the CEO of Too Good To Go — an organization that works with restaurants and food retailers to tackle waste by selling food at a discounted price. The app has 11 million users and works with 22,000 stores across 11 countries. Her involvement with the company began around 9 months after the service was launched, when a friend who knew its founders showed her the app. “I thought it was such a cool concept,” she told CNBC. “I got invited to invest and then was asked to help the founders run the business.” She said her core driving force when it came to work was being part of a company that had a strong purpose and could make a real impact. “I work a lot and put everything into it, so I want to do something that really matters,” she explained. “My first company was designed to make fitness fun, and now I have an even stronger purpose in tackling food waste. I just hadn’t realized the scale of this problem, but it had always been natural to me not to throw away food.” Entrepreneurs looking to grow a company needed to follow her lead and work on something that they felt was meaningful, Lykke added. “Make sure you’re really, really passionate about what you do — that’s fundamental,” she said. “There are going to be days and nights where, if you don’t have that passion, it’s going to be too difficult.”

As well as being passionate about their business, start-up founders needed to build a team who believed in the purpose of the company. “Being clear about the company’s vision is important, (but) the people you find for your team need to believe what you believe — it’s important to establish that team really early on,” Lykke told CNBC. She noted that having a strong ethical purpose was also a big competitive advantage, helping to attract both talented employees and investors.

Seek advice — and share it too


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, really, sees, mistake, app, food, business, sold, common, waste, team, 85, company, woman, startups, works, purpose, heres, lykke, work, million


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This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC

This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC9 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Chloe Potter works as a loan specialist in Charlotte, but she has ambitions to run her own coffee shop. This is how she spends her money.


This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC9 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Chloe Potter works as a loan specialist in Charlotte, but she has ambitions to run her own coffee shop. This is how she spends her money.
This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, works, charlotte, nc, 26yearold, enabled, flash, specialist, try, lives, view, 38000, browser, spends, site


This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC

This 26-year-old lives on $38,000 a year in Charlotte, NC

9 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Chloe Potter works as a loan specialist in Charlotte, but she has ambitions to run her own coffee shop. This is how she spends her money.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08
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Stanford analyzed 292 retirement strategies to determine the best one—here’s how it works

In 2017, the Stanford Center on Longevity analyzed 292 different retirement income strategies and determined the best way for most people to withdraw their savings. It’s called the “spend safely in retirement strategy” (SSiRS) and involves two basic components: delaying Social Security benefits and creating an “automatic retirement paycheck.” “No other retirement income generator has all of those positive features, so maximizing Social Security is a key part of this strategy.” The IRS requires y


In 2017, the Stanford Center on Longevity analyzed 292 different retirement income strategies and determined the best way for most people to withdraw their savings. It’s called the “spend safely in retirement strategy” (SSiRS) and involves two basic components: delaying Social Security benefits and creating an “automatic retirement paycheck.” “No other retirement income generator has all of those positive features, so maximizing Social Security is a key part of this strategy.” The IRS requires y
Stanford analyzed 292 retirement strategies to determine the best one—here’s how it works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oneheres, stanford, analyzed, workers, 292, savings, retirement, security, works, fund, withdraw, strategies, income, report, social, determine, ssirs, best


Stanford analyzed 292 retirement strategies to determine the best one—here's how it works

In 2017, the Stanford Center on Longevity analyzed 292 different retirement income strategies and determined the best way for most people to withdraw their savings. It’s called the “spend safely in retirement strategy” (SSiRS) and involves two basic components: delaying Social Security benefits and creating an “automatic retirement paycheck.” In a new 2019 report, “Viability of the Spend Safely in Retirement Strategy,” the research team took a deeper dive into the SSiRS and explored different ways to implement it. The strategy is designed to be used by middle-income workers and retirees, which the report defines as those having $1 million or less in retirement savings. Here’s a closer look at how the two key components of the SSiRS work.

1. Delay Social Security payments until age 70

“Social Security will deliver the majority of retirement income for middle-income workers, even for workers currently in their 20s and 30s,” Steve Vernon, co-author of the report, tells CNBC Make It. It’ll be anywhere from 60-80% of their total income, he says. Social Security is “a nearly perfect retirement income generator,” he continues, because it protects against inflation, doesn’t go down if the stock market crashes, is paid automatically into your checking account and some of it isn’t subject to income taxes. “No other retirement income generator has all of those positive features, so maximizing Social Security is a key part of this strategy.” For younger workers, it’s likely that the benefits may be reduced by around 20% to 25% of where they are today. But it should still be a part of their retirement planning strategy.

The best way to optimize Social Security’s benefits is to delay receiving them until you turn 70, Vernon says, which means working longer in some way. If you want to retire before then, one option is to work part-time and make just enough to cover living expenses until 70, he suggests. If working part- or full-time until 70 is out of the question for you, the next best thing to do is to fund what’s called a “Social Security bridge payment,” which acts as a “retirement transition fund,” according to the report. To create this payment, withdraw the same amount you would have received from Social Security from your other retirement savings, such as a 401(k) or IRA, and keep it in a separate account. If your Social Security payment is $20,000 per year and you’re delaying it for five years, you’d set aside $100,000 to withdraw over those five years. However, the amount you decide to set aside in this fund is up to you: “Some workers might decide it should be a large enough amount to cover their estimated living expenses for a specified period, say two to five years,” the report says. “Another use for a retirement transition fund is to set aside enough savings to cover the amount of the Social Security benefit they plan to delay for as long as needed.” No matter the amount you choose to put in it, the purpose of the bridge payment is to delay Social Security payments for as long as possible. As for where to keep this money, “the retirement transition fund can be set up as a separate account in a worker’s IRA or 401(k) plan,” says Vernon. “Alternatively, retirees can use other investment accounts for this purpose. Since the investment horizon for the retirement transition fund is short, they could invest in stable, liquid investments, such as a short-term bond fund, money market fund or the 401(k) plan’s stable value fund, if it has such a fund.”

2. Create an “automatic retirement paycheck”

To supplement Social Security income, you want to generate consistent “paychecks” from your 401(k) and IRA accounts that will last the rest of your life. You’ll use these paychecks to pay for basic living expenses, such as housing, food and transportation. To do so, it’s important to withdraw the right amount from your savings each year so that you don’t run out. The IRS requires you to make minimum withdrawals from your retirement savings starting at age 70 ½, known as the required minimum distribution, or RMD. The SSiRS recommends simply withdrawing this amount. At 70 ½, the minimum is 3.65% of your savings, and the percentage increases every year. Many IRA and 401(k) administrators can calculate your RMD and pay it automatically in the frequency you want, so you will essentially be creating an automatic, and reliable, retirement paycheck. You don’t have to spend the money that you withdraw, the report adds: You “have the option to pay income taxes on these withdrawals and invest part or all of the after-tax proceeds.” That means if your RMD is more than you need to live on, you can put the extra money back into the market, ideally in a low-cost target date fund, balanced fund or stock index fund. While “there is no perfect retirement income strategy,” Vernon says, the SSiRS can “help virtually anybody generate a stream of income in retirement.” Read the full report, which also outlines possible refinements to the baseline SSiRS, here. Don’t miss: Sallie Krawcheck: Use this simple formula to figure out how much money you should save and spend Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-06  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oneheres, stanford, analyzed, workers, 292, savings, retirement, security, works, fund, withdraw, strategies, income, report, social, determine, ssirs, best


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Google says you’ll be able to control its new phone without touching the screen

Google on Monday again teased its upcoming Pixel 4 phone, which it’s expected to announce sometime this fall. The company posted a short video on Twitter showing how users will be able to control the phone without touching by using hand gestures. “Face unlock uses facial recognition technology that is processed on your device, so that image data never leaves your phone. The images used for face unlock are never saved or shared with other Google services,” the company explained. “These capabiliti


Google on Monday again teased its upcoming Pixel 4 phone, which it’s expected to announce sometime this fall. The company posted a short video on Twitter showing how users will be able to control the phone without touching by using hand gestures. “Face unlock uses facial recognition technology that is processed on your device, so that image data never leaves your phone. The images used for face unlock are never saved or shared with other Google services,” the company explained. “These capabiliti
Google says you’ll be able to control its new phone without touching the screen Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, works, control, technology, sense, face, google, screen, phone, motion, xl, pixel, unlock, able, touching


Google says you'll be able to control its new phone without touching the screen

Google on Monday again teased its upcoming Pixel 4 phone, which it’s expected to announce sometime this fall. It follows a similar tweet posted in June that first revealed the phone.

The company posted a short video on Twitter showing how users will be able to control the phone without touching by using hand gestures. It also explained how the feature works in a blog post.

The clip starts by showing a user unlocking the Pixel 4 by looking at it, similar to how Apple’s Face ID works on the iPhone. Traditionally, Android phone face-unlock mechanisms haven’t been as secure as Face ID, and Android phones have instead relied on fingerprint readers for security and face unlock for convenience. Google says this is more secure now.

“Face unlock uses facial recognition technology that is processed on your device, so that image data never leaves your phone. The images used for face unlock are never saved or shared with other Google services,” the company explained.

The video also shows a user skipping songs in an app without touching the phone, again suggesting the front-facing camera is more advanced than usual.

The option is called “Motion Sense” and uses radar technology called “Soli” that was developed by Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects team.

“Pixel 4 will be the first device with Soli, powering our new Motion Sense features to allow you to skip songs, snooze alarms, and silence phone calls, just by waving your hand,” Google said. “These capabilities are just the start, and just as Pixels get better over time, Motion Sense will evolve as well. Motion Sense will be available in select Pixel countries.”

The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL were launched last October, when Google traditionally releases its new phones. The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL are expected around the same time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youll, works, control, technology, sense, face, google, screen, phone, motion, xl, pixel, unlock, able, touching


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Japan mourns after the worst mass killing in two decades claims 33 lives in arson attack

An aerial view shows firefighters battling fires at the site where a man started a fire after spraying a liquid at a three-story studio of Kyoto Animation Co. in Kyoto, western Japan. Animation fans and Kyoto residents gathered at the site of Japan’s worst mass killing in 18 years on Friday, offering flowers and prayers for the 33 people who died in an arson attack on an animation studio in the city. A number of people gathered near the charred three-story studio of Kyoto Animation in the wester


An aerial view shows firefighters battling fires at the site where a man started a fire after spraying a liquid at a three-story studio of Kyoto Animation Co. in Kyoto, western Japan. Animation fans and Kyoto residents gathered at the site of Japan’s worst mass killing in 18 years on Friday, offering flowers and prayers for the 33 people who died in an arson attack on an animation studio in the city. A number of people gathered near the charred three-story studio of Kyoto Animation in the wester
Japan mourns after the worst mass killing in two decades claims 33 lives in arson attack Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decades, kyoto, man, gathered, studio, site, japanese, animation, worst, died, works, die, mass, japan, lives, killing, mourns, attack, claims, arson


Japan mourns after the worst mass killing in two decades claims 33 lives in arson attack

An aerial view shows firefighters battling fires at the site where a man started a fire after spraying a liquid at a three-story studio of Kyoto Animation Co. in Kyoto, western Japan.

Animation fans and Kyoto residents gathered at the site of Japan’s worst mass killing in 18 years on Friday, offering flowers and prayers for the 33 people who died in an arson attack on an animation studio in the city.

A number of people gathered near the charred three-story studio of Kyoto Animation in the western Japanese city, where a day earlier a suspected arsonist shouted “Die!” and that he had been plagiarized before dousing the building with what appeared to be petrol and setting it ablaze.

On Friday morning people gathered in the rain at the edge of the cordon set up by police and fire officials.

“It’s hard to put into words how I feel,” said 27-year-old Yuichi Kumami, a self-described animation fan, who had taken time off work at his company in nearby Osaka to lay flowers at the site.

“They may not be able to produce the same kind of works again and it was my hope that there would be more memorable works in the future, but that may be impossible now and that is very saddening,” he said, his voice cracking with emotion.

A pillar of Japanese popular culture, animation has become a major cultural export, winning fans around the world. Kyoto Animation has an outsized role in the industry, with its influence outstripping the list of works it has produced.

Local resident Kazuko Yoshida, 78, said she lived close to the site and had smelt smoke on Thursday. From her second-floor window, she saw smoke and helicopters.

“I wonder why the company was targeted, why those people had to be caught up in this. It sounds like the man who did it wanted to die,” she said.

“If he wanted to die he should have died alone, why did he have to involve other people? He is a terrible person.”

One 23-year-old university student paid his respects before going to his lessons. He said he was a fan of “anime”, as Japanese animation is known.

“You hear about gun killings overseas, but anyone can get their hands on gasoline and that is pretty frightening,” he said. “You can’t stop people from buying gasoline, perhaps there’s a way to offer help to people who might be tempted to commit crimes.”

One local man, 82, passing by on his bicycle said he previously lived in the neighborhood.

“There was no fire escape on the outside of the building and I think that was a big reason why so many people died,” he said.

“There was only one way for them to escape.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, decades, kyoto, man, gathered, studio, site, japanese, animation, worst, died, works, die, mass, japan, lives, killing, mourns, attack, claims, arson


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Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr


Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr
Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


Many high school students don't understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.”

That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test.

Regardless of economic background, most families pointed to price as a very important consideration in choosing a college. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans.

More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accrue on them while the student is enrolled in college.

Most students also didn’t know that student loans can be repaid on an “income-driven ” plan, in which their monthly payments are capped at a percentage of their income.

Another recent study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that just 11% of ninth graders can correctly estimate the tuition and fees for one year at a public four-year college in their state. Around 57% overestimated the costs, and 32% underestimated them.

“The findings highlight an urgent need for more financial literacy-specific interventions, especially in light of the economic stakes at hand,” said Jim Larimore, chief officer for ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


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A performance-enhancing pill based on the gut bacteria of elite athletes is in the works

The group later did a second analysis of 87 ultra-marathoners and Olympic-trial rowers and found similarly high levels of Veillonella. It appears that Veillonella works by feeding of off lactic acid, a compound produced in the muscles during exercise. His team at the New York-based early stage start-up (which is venture funded and also has a slew of private investors) is currently developing a prototype of a probiotic supplement containing Veillonella from elite athletes for commercial use. Acco


The group later did a second analysis of 87 ultra-marathoners and Olympic-trial rowers and found similarly high levels of Veillonella. It appears that Veillonella works by feeding of off lactic acid, a compound produced in the muscles during exercise. His team at the New York-based early stage start-up (which is venture funded and also has a slew of private investors) is currently developing a prototype of a probiotic supplement containing Veillonella from elite athletes for commercial use. Acco
A performance-enhancing pill based on the gut bacteria of elite athletes is in the works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supplement, veillonella, scheiman, fitbiomics, based, works, exercise, gut, probiotic, pill, bacteria, think, athletes, performanceenhancing, research, elite, study


A performance-enhancing pill based on the gut bacteria of elite athletes is in the works

New research out Monday has identified a special type of gut bacteria found in elite athletes that may play a role in boosting their performance during rigorous exercise — and it could lead to a probiotic-like supplement that “regular joes” could use to enhance their performance in a few years.

“The future of fitness is here and it’s something that we’re rapidly developing,” Jonathan Scheiman, former Harvard postdoctoral fellow and CEO and co-founder of FitBiomics, tells CNBC Make It. “We want to translate this into consumer products to promote health and wellness [to the masses].”

The study, published in the journal Nature Medicine by 17 researchers, including Scheiman, found that, after they exercise, marathon runners and endurance athletes have higher levels of a bacteria called Veillonella in their digestive microbiomes (the unique colonies of bacteria that exist in your body) as compared to inactive individuals.

Researchers then isolated a strain of Veillonella from a marathon runner and inserted it into the colons of lab mice — they found the mice given Veillonella ran 13% longer on a treadmill compared to mice who were not given the bacteria.

“It might not seem like a huge number, but I definitely think its biologically significant and certainly if you ask a marathon runner, if they could increase their running ability by 13% — I think that they will be generally interested,” Aleksandar Kostic, co-author of the study and an assistant professor of microbiology at the Joslin Diabetes Center tells CNBC Make It.

The group later did a second analysis of 87 ultra-marathoners and Olympic-trial rowers and found similarly high levels of Veillonella. It appears that Veillonella works by feeding of off lactic acid, a compound produced in the muscles during exercise. The bacteria then turns into a compound called propionate (a common short-chain fatty acid), which may aid in boosting one’s athletic performance, researchers say.

While there’s much more research to be done (the concept hasn’t been tested on humans yet), Scheiman left Harvard a little more than a year ago after working on the study for four years to launch FitBiomics with several study co-authors from Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.

His team at the New York-based early stage start-up (which is venture funded and also has a slew of private investors) is currently developing a prototype of a probiotic supplement containing Veillonella from elite athletes for commercial use. He says it will most likely be purified into a supplement that can be used in a variety of food and beverage formats.

However, he has no firm timetable on when he expects the products will be ready for human trials. “Science takes time. Since its a probiotic, we’re not necessarily reinventing the wheel here, we’re just sort of disrupting and evolving it,” he says. “Obviously, we want to do human studies but I think the future of fitness is here.”

Dr. Rabia De Latour, assistant professor of Gastroenterology medicine at New York University School of Medicine, says while the study is “really interesting,” the jury is still out as to whether this study can be recreated in humans to enhance exercise.

“[The study] shines a light on something that we all know — that the microbiome is extremely important but we don’t fully understand it yet,” De Latour says.

However, she says that the microbiome does play a much larger role in our health and well-being than we previously thought.

“In the past few years, studies found that transplanting stool from a donor to a recipient suffering from a Clostridium difficile infection (a bad infectious bacteria) helped to keep his ‘bad’ bacteria at bay. This discovery was groundbreaking,” she says.

The discovery, she adds, prompted many scientists and physicians to begin testing what else can be achieved by manipulating bacteria in the microbiome.

However, more research needs to be done on fecal transplants as earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration issued a safety alert over the use of fecal transplants after one recipient died. The treatment has not been approved by the FDA yet.

Kostic, who has equity in FitBiomics, says that with Veillonella, the overall goal goes beyond helping people increase stamina during workouts.

“What we envision is a probiotic supplement that people can take that will increase their ability to do meaningful exercise and therefore protect them against chronic diseases including diabetes,” he says.

According to Scheiman, FitBiomics made no contributions to fund the current study and the research was done solely for academic purposes. The study was funded by the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health.

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Don’t miss: Fitness coach: These 10-minute workouts will instantly wake you up—even when you’re feeling sluggish


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, supplement, veillonella, scheiman, fitbiomics, based, works, exercise, gut, probiotic, pill, bacteria, think, athletes, performanceenhancing, research, elite, study


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Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc


Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day. His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhanc
Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here’s the rest of his daily routine Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


Alex Rodriguez drinks 9 cups of coffee a day—here's the rest of his daily routine

Former MLB star Alex Rodriguez, who now runs an investment company, A-Rod Corp, and commentates for ESPN, works 80 to 100 hours a week. And he relies on a lot of caffeine to get through each day.

His schedule is “filled with meetings and phone calls and lectures and TV appearances, with his weekends fully accounted for by his ESPN duties,” Ben Reiter reports in his Sport Illustrated cover story on the reinvention of A-Rod, who was suspended for the entire 2014 season for using performance-enhancing drugs.

Rodriguez, now 43, also helps former athletes turn their finances around on CNBC’s show, “Back in the Game,” co-hosts the popular Barstool Sports podcast “The Corp” and is a father of two daughters.

Plus, he still makes time to work out, Reiter adds: “He’ll often hit the gym at one in the morning, fueled by one of the nine cups of coffee he can consume a day.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rest, routine, drinks, espn, works, week, using, daily, corp, weekends, tv, coffee, rodriguez, dayheres, alex, reiter, work, arod, cups


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