Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th


Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th
Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world's biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

The toy emporium that Charles P. Lazarus envisioned has been reduced to dusty floors and empty shelves.

Much has been said about the demise of the toy empire, which this week announced its plan to liquidate. There have been fingers pointed at corporate raiders, Amazon and big-box stores. All contributed to its undoing.

Ultimately, though, Toys R Us’ collapse is a story of loyalty run dry. The store in its early days fostered devotion from customers and toymakers. In the end, it lost hold on both.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. It didn’t invest in its stores, even as it was adding to the fleet, leaving it vulnerable when new competition moved in.

The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. By 1978, he had created a toy superstore large enough to become a public company.

In its heyday in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the most important toy store in the country, if not the world. Its strength grew as competitors Kiddie City and Child World went out of business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


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There’s ‘no winner’ in a trade war, warns IMF deputy managing director

If global supply chains are forced to adjust to the ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China, it could cost the world economy about 1 percent of its GDP by next year, a senior IMF official warned. When resources are reallocated due to market forces, that is considered to be an improvement in efficiency, said Tao Zhang, deputy managing director at the International Monetary Fund. It would cost the entire world “close to 1 percent of GDP by 2019,” Zhang added. The IMF recently cut global


If global supply chains are forced to adjust to the ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China, it could cost the world economy about 1 percent of its GDP by next year, a senior IMF official warned. When resources are reallocated due to market forces, that is considered to be an improvement in efficiency, said Tao Zhang, deputy managing director at the International Monetary Fund. It would cost the entire world “close to 1 percent of GDP by 2019,” Zhang added. The IMF recently cut global
There’s ‘no winner’ in a trade war, warns IMF deputy managing director Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, alex wroblewski, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, winner, theres, war, global, cost, deputy, gdp, points, imf, grow, percentage, trade, managing, director, zhang, warns


There's 'no winner' in a trade war, warns IMF deputy managing director

If global supply chains are forced to adjust to the ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China, it could cost the world economy about 1 percent of its GDP by next year, a senior IMF official warned.

When resources are reallocated due to market forces, that is considered to be an improvement in efficiency, said Tao Zhang, deputy managing director at the International Monetary Fund. But when those changes happen due to unnatural distortions in the global environment, the cost of adjustment is high, he told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford on Saturday, during the IMF and World Bank annual meetings in Bali, Indonesia.

It would cost the entire world “close to 1 percent of GDP by 2019,” Zhang added. “This gives you (an) illustration of how serious the result will be, but, in reality, we will see probably even more complicated implications, not only on trade, investment, but also on confidence and people’s psychological reactions.”

The IMF recently cut global growth forecasts: It predicted that the world economy would grow at 3.7 percent this year and next year — down 0.2 percentage points from an earlier forecast. The fund also cut its predictions for global trade volumes: The total goods and services flow is expected to grow by 4.2 percent this year and 4 percent next year — down 0.6 and 0.5 percentage points, respectively, from earlier estimates.

According to Zhang, there are no beneficiaries in a trade war. Even if a country appears to have come out on top, it would potentially do so at the expense of production capacities and a reduction in final demand.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, alex wroblewski, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, winner, theres, war, global, cost, deputy, gdp, points, imf, grow, percentage, trade, managing, director, zhang, warns


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US Treasury yields rise as investors monitor diplomatic tensions with Saudi Arabia

As the new week kicks into action, many investors remained cautious following an abrupt market shakeout in the previous trading week. Not helping the mood, oil prices bounced and Saudi Arabia’s shares tumbled amid rising diplomatic tensions between Riyadh and Washington over the disappearance of a journalist critical of Saudi policies. On the auction front, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $45 billion in 13-week bills and $39 billion in 26-week bills on Monday. In the economic sphere, retail


As the new week kicks into action, many investors remained cautious following an abrupt market shakeout in the previous trading week. Not helping the mood, oil prices bounced and Saudi Arabia’s shares tumbled amid rising diplomatic tensions between Riyadh and Washington over the disappearance of a journalist critical of Saudi policies. On the auction front, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $45 billion in 13-week bills and $39 billion in 26-week bills on Monday. In the economic sphere, retail
US Treasury yields rise as investors monitor diplomatic tensions with Saudi Arabia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, rise, tensions, billion, wti, diplomatic, monitor, yields, investors, auction, world, bills, saudi, arabia, west, prices, data, treasury


US Treasury yields rise as investors monitor diplomatic tensions with Saudi Arabia

As the new week kicks into action, many investors remained cautious following an abrupt market shakeout in the previous trading week.

Not helping the mood, oil prices bounced and Saudi Arabia’s shares tumbled amid rising diplomatic tensions between Riyadh and Washington over the disappearance of a journalist critical of Saudi policies.

International benchmark Brent crude traded at around $81.14 Monday morning, up around 0.7 percent, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) stood at $71.77, slightly more than 0.4 percent higher.

Soaring energy prices could boost inflation around the world and spark rises in U.S. borrowing costs, which are also seen hampering weak borrowers — particularly in emerging markets.

On the auction front, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $45 billion in 13-week bills and $39 billion in 26-week bills on Monday.

In the economic sphere, retail sales figures for September are scheduled to be published at around 8:30 a.m. ET on Monday. Later in the session, Empire State Manufacturing Index data for October and business inventories data for August are both set to be released at around 10:00 a.m.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, set, rise, tensions, billion, wti, diplomatic, monitor, yields, investors, auction, world, bills, saudi, arabia, west, prices, data, treasury


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Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world

Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world6 Hours AgoThe EVP of Zenith tells MMM that we shouldn’t focus too much on gimmicks but marketers should be aware of how technology changes consumer behaviour


Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world6 Hours AgoThe EVP of Zenith tells MMM that we shouldn’t focus too much on gimmicks but marketers should be aware of how technology changes consumer behaviour
Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zenith, mmm, hours, festival, shouldnt, technology, goodwin, world6, tells, world, marketers, marketing, tom, changing


Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world

Festival of Marketing: Tom Goodwin on a changing world

6 Hours Ago

The EVP of Zenith tells MMM that we shouldn’t focus too much on gimmicks but marketers should be aware of how technology changes consumer behaviour


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zenith, mmm, hours, festival, shouldnt, technology, goodwin, world6, tells, world, marketers, marketing, tom, changing


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Facebook early exec Sean Parker: Why he left consumer tech for health

Sean Parker, founder of Napster and the first president of Facebook, pivoted to medical technology because he worried about how his social media and consumer internet products were impacting society. “You’re not 100 percent sure if you’re having a totally positive or totally negative impact in the world when you’re working in consumer internet,” Parker explained at the Wired25 conference in San Francisco on Monday. In 2016, he started the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (PICI) to devel


Sean Parker, founder of Napster and the first president of Facebook, pivoted to medical technology because he worried about how his social media and consumer internet products were impacting society. “You’re not 100 percent sure if you’re having a totally positive or totally negative impact in the world when you’re working in consumer internet,” Parker explained at the Wired25 conference in San Francisco on Monday. In 2016, he started the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (PICI) to devel
Facebook early exec Sean Parker: Why he left consumer tech for health Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: michelle castillo, matt winkelmeyer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, having, tech, internet, youre, parker, impact, early, health, facebook, exec, important, sean, consumer, work, world, left


Facebook early exec Sean Parker: Why he left consumer tech for health

Sean Parker, founder of Napster and the first president of Facebook, pivoted to medical technology because he worried about how his social media and consumer internet products were impacting society.

“You’re not 100 percent sure if you’re having a totally positive or totally negative impact in the world when you’re working in consumer internet,” Parker explained at the Wired25 conference in San Francisco on Monday.

“You’re spending a lot of time trying to make your products as addictive as possible. Transitioning to life sciences is incredibly refreshing, because you really feel as though the energy and time you are putting into it are helping people. It’s about saving lives, really changing people’s lives, advancing medicine.”

Parker said he could never have predicted the impact Facebook would have on today’s world, pointing out the move to mobile made it “ubiquitous” and “rewire(d) the fabric of society.” In 2016, he started the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy (PICI) to develop better cancer treatments.

“I, at some point, got a little bit frustrated with the monoculture of the consumer internet world,” Parker said. “It feels somewhat unsatisfying to constantly make products for teenage girls…. You worry about what this effect may be having on their development and on society.”

It was refreshing to work with scientists instead of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, he said.

“Every 22-year- old shows up at your doorstep with this sort of belief that they are going to be the next Mark Zuckerberg, and they deserve to be a billionaire, and their company deserves an absolutely obscene valuation,” Parker said.

Scientists find the work itself “the true reward,” Parker said. His new work reminds Parker of the early days working on the Internet when people like him were more interested in making products that were “great for the world.”

“Scientists have a level of humility where they have quite a bit of pride in their work, and being published is important, and being recognized by your peers is important, and having an impact on patients is important – but scientists aren’t running around trying to get rich and don’t have the same distorted expectations about how rich they are going to become,” he pointed out.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: michelle castillo, matt winkelmeyer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, products, having, tech, internet, youre, parker, impact, early, health, facebook, exec, important, sean, consumer, work, world, left


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Pressure on Saudi Arabia over Jamal Khashoggi may escalate, bring pain

With Saudi Arabia denying a role in the sudden disappearance of a prominent journalist — and vowing to push back against any effort at international retribution — the chances are growing that the crisis could escalate, and ricochet across the global economy. On Sunday, the world reacted to last week’s vanishing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of the Saudi Government. The West has threatened consequences for the kingdom, which is suspected of having captured the journal


With Saudi Arabia denying a role in the sudden disappearance of a prominent journalist — and vowing to push back against any effort at international retribution — the chances are growing that the crisis could escalate, and ricochet across the global economy. On Sunday, the world reacted to last week’s vanishing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of the Saudi Government. The West has threatened consequences for the kingdom, which is suspected of having captured the journal
Pressure on Saudi Arabia over Jamal Khashoggi may escalate, bring pain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: javier e david, tom dichristopher, patti domm, ted kemp, jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images, murad sezer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bring, world, jamal, pain, khashoggi, escalate, disappearance, west, pressure, weeks, arabia, kingdom, journalist, saudi


Pressure on Saudi Arabia over Jamal Khashoggi may escalate, bring pain

With Saudi Arabia denying a role in the sudden disappearance of a prominent journalist — and vowing to push back against any effort at international retribution — the chances are growing that the crisis could escalate, and ricochet across the global economy.

On Sunday, the world reacted to last week’s vanishing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and critic of the Saudi Government. The West has threatened consequences for the kingdom, which is suspected of having captured the journalist at a Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

The governments of the United Kingdom, France and Germany on Sunday called for a “credible investigation to establish the truth about what happened, and — if relevant — to identify those bearing responsibility for the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, and ensure that they are held to account.”

Although Saudi Arabia has fiercely denied any involvement, reports suggest Riyadh may been behind Khashoggi’s disappearance, with Turkey airing suspicions that the journalist may have been killed by Saudi operatives.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: javier e david, tom dichristopher, patti domm, ted kemp, jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images, murad sezer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bring, world, jamal, pain, khashoggi, escalate, disappearance, west, pressure, weeks, arabia, kingdom, journalist, saudi


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BOJ’s Kuroda warns of darkening global prospects as trade tensions weigh

Kuroda urged global policymakers to continue their dialogue with a “renewed recognition on the importance of free trade,” warning that further escalation of protectionism would harm trade, business confidence and global growth. “We should pay more attention to protectionist moves, as global economies have become increasingly interdependent through global value chains,” he said. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pledged to proceed with a sales tax hike to 10 percent from 8 percent in October next yea


Kuroda urged global policymakers to continue their dialogue with a “renewed recognition on the importance of free trade,” warning that further escalation of protectionism would harm trade, business confidence and global growth. “We should pay more attention to protectionist moves, as global economies have become increasingly interdependent through global value chains,” he said. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pledged to proceed with a sales tax hike to 10 percent from 8 percent in October next yea
BOJ’s Kuroda warns of darkening global prospects as trade tensions weigh Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kuroda, world, weigh, global, economies, economy, tax, weekend, prospects, darkening, tensions, hike, trade, bojs, market, warns


BOJ's Kuroda warns of darkening global prospects as trade tensions weigh

Escalating trade tension, emerging market turbulence and huge debt piling up in some countries pose risks to the world economy, Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said on Sunday, his strongest warning to date over a darkening global outlook.

U.S. President Donald Trump’s “America First” policies and escalating Sino-Chinese trade frictions have overshadowed a weekend meeting of G20 finance leaders, many of whom expressed concerns over the harm to global growth from trade conflict.

Kuroda urged global policymakers to continue their dialogue with a “renewed recognition on the importance of free trade,” warning that further escalation of protectionism would harm trade, business confidence and global growth.

“The recent rise of protectionist moves and tightening of financial conditions in some economies remind policymakers of the importance of being vigilant at all times,” Kuroda told a seminar on the sidelines of the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank in Indonesia.

“We should pay more attention to protectionist moves, as global economies have become increasingly interdependent through global value chains,” he said.

In Japan, a scheduled domestic consumption tax hike next year is unlikely to inflict major damage to the economy, he added, rebuffing the views of some analysts that the increase ought to be postponed to ensure a sustained recovery.

“At this stage, there would not be any major negative impact on the economy,” Kuroda said after the weekend gathering of G20 finance leaders, as the hit to growth from next year’s tax hike would be “much, much smaller” than from an increase in 2014.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pledged to proceed with a sales tax hike to 10 percent from 8 percent in October next year. The plan was postponed twice after the previous hike to 8 percent from 5 percent pushed the economy into recession.

Kuroda also called for vigilance over market developments, after last week’s market rout sent global stocks tanking on fears about prospects of slowing world growth.

“For now, severe market stress has been limited in certain economies,” as emerging economies have sufficient buffers against market turbulence, he added.

“But more attention is being directed to economies that accumulated a substantial amount of debt. Political risks, including the rise of trade tensions … are coming to the forefront as well.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-14  Authors: str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, kuroda, world, weigh, global, economies, economy, tax, weekend, prospects, darkening, tensions, hike, trade, bojs, market, warns


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IMF Christine Lagarde on Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance, Saudi Arabia

BALI, Indonesia — Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, said she is “horrified” at the disappearance and suspected killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi but still plans to attend a conference in Saudi Arabia later this month. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Friday that he, too, still plans to attend FII. “We are concerned about what is the status of Mr. Khashoggi,” Mnuchin told CNBC. Saudi Arabia has denied wrongdoing. Khashoggi had been liv


BALI, Indonesia — Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, said she is “horrified” at the disappearance and suspected killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi but still plans to attend a conference in Saudi Arabia later this month. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Friday that he, too, still plans to attend FII. “We are concerned about what is the status of Mr. Khashoggi,” Mnuchin told CNBC. Saudi Arabia has denied wrongdoing. Khashoggi had been liv
IMF Christine Lagarde on Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance, Saudi Arabia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-13  Authors: yen nee lee, chris somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visit, arabia, khashoggis, told, world, jamal, christine, lagarde, saudi, imf, attend, disappearance, information, khashoggi


IMF Christine Lagarde on Jamal Khashoggi's disappearance, Saudi Arabia

BALI, Indonesia — Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, said she is “horrified” at the disappearance and suspected killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi but still plans to attend a conference in Saudi Arabia later this month.

“Human rights, freedom of information are essential rights. And horrifying things have been reported and I am horrified,” she told reporters on Saturday in Bali, Indonesia, where the IMF and World Bank are conducting their annual meetings.

“But I have to conduct the business of IMF in all corners of the world, and with many governments,” she added. “When I visit a country, I always speak my mind. You know me, I do. At this point in time, my intention is to not change my plan and to be very attentive to the information that is coming out in the next few days, but I speak my mind.”

Lagarde was responding to a question on whether she will proceed with her planned visit to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to attend the Future Investment Initiative, also known as “Davos in the Desert,” which is scheduled for Oct. 23 to 25.

Several luminaries and media outlets — including CNBC, Financial Times, CNN and The New York Times — have withdrawn from the event, citing concerns about the disappearance of Khashoggi and his alleged murder.

Lagarde is not the only one who is going ahead with attending the conference. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Friday that he, too, still plans to attend FII.

“We are concerned about what is the status of Mr. Khashoggi,” Mnuchin told CNBC. “If more information comes out and changes, we could look at that, but I am planning on going.”

Khashoggi, a critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and the Saudi royal family, was last seen Oct. 2 when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Saudi Arabia has denied wrongdoing. Turkey has reportedly informed the U.S. that it has video and audio evidence showing Khashoggi, who wrote for The Washington Post, was killed inside the consulate.

Khashoggi had been living in the United States as a voluntary exile from Saudi Arabia.

Several senators, led by Republicans Bob Corker and Lindsey Graham, have triggered a U.S. investigation into Khashoggi’s whereabouts. The White House has said senior administration officials, including President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and top advisor Jared Kushner and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, have been in contact with the crown prince regarding the journalist’s disappearance.

— CNBC’s Mike Calia contributed reporting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-13  Authors: yen nee lee, chris somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, visit, arabia, khashoggis, told, world, jamal, christine, lagarde, saudi, imf, attend, disappearance, information, khashoggi


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US crude posts 4% weekly loss, settling at $71.34, dragged down by market sell-off

Brent crude gave back early gains and turned lower Friday after a closely watched forecaster said world oil supply is adequate and the outlook for demand is weakening. Meanwhile, U.S. crude pared gains but stayed in positive territory on a lift from Wall Street. The monthly report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) on Friday weighed on crude markets. The IEA said the market looked “adequately supplied for now” and trimmed its forecasts for world oil demand growth this year and next. “The d


Brent crude gave back early gains and turned lower Friday after a closely watched forecaster said world oil supply is adequate and the outlook for demand is weakening. Meanwhile, U.S. crude pared gains but stayed in positive territory on a lift from Wall Street. The monthly report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) on Friday weighed on crude markets. The IEA said the market looked “adequately supplied for now” and trimmed its forecasts for world oil demand growth this year and next. “The d
US crude posts 4% weekly loss, settling at $71.34, dragged down by market sell-off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, iea, loss, oil, market, gains, demand, outlook, dragged, supply, york, selloff, crude, posts, 7134, weekly, settling


US crude posts 4% weekly loss, settling at $71.34, dragged down by market sell-off

Brent crude gave back early gains and turned lower Friday after a closely watched forecaster said world oil supply is adequate and the outlook for demand is weakening.

Meanwhile, U.S. crude pared gains but stayed in positive territory on a lift from Wall Street.

The monthly report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) on Friday weighed on crude markets. The IEA said the market looked “adequately supplied for now” and trimmed its forecasts for world oil demand growth this year and next.

“The weaker outlook has gotten a raised profile in the market, but there’s potential for a real supply crunch toward the end of this year,” said John Kilduff, a partner at Again Capital Management in New York. “The demand outlook is hurt right now because of the situation with the U.S. and China in particular.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, world, iea, loss, oil, market, gains, demand, outlook, dragged, supply, york, selloff, crude, posts, 7134, weekly, settling


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