Uncertainty looms as Hong Kong protests drag into new week

Hundreds of protesters remained in the streets of Hong Kong on Monday morning as the new work week began. Even though Chief Executive Carrie Lam caved in to pressure and suspended the passage of the bill on Saturday, critics of the proposal are calling for her resignation and demanding that the legislation be withdrawn completely. The head of a local U.S. business group called the suspension of the bill a step in the right direction, but added that the whole idea needs to be completely scrapped.


Hundreds of protesters remained in the streets of Hong Kong on Monday morning as the new work week began. Even though Chief Executive Carrie Lam caved in to pressure and suspended the passage of the bill on Saturday, critics of the proposal are calling for her resignation and demanding that the legislation be withdrawn completely. The head of a local U.S. business group called the suspension of the bill a step in the right direction, but added that the whole idea needs to be completely scrapped.
Uncertainty looms as Hong Kong protests drag into new week Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrawn, protests, week, drag, uncertainty, hong, bill, kong, china, thats, worries, passage, wont, work, looms


Uncertainty looms as Hong Kong protests drag into new week

Hundreds of protesters remained in the streets of Hong Kong on Monday morning as the new work week began.

Cars were able to pass and most roads largely returned to normal, a day after a massive outpouring of anger over a controversial extradition bill that would allow fugitives to be sent to China for trial.

Even though Chief Executive Carrie Lam caved in to pressure and suspended the passage of the bill on Saturday, critics of the proposal are calling for her resignation and demanding that the legislation be withdrawn completely.

The head of a local U.S. business group called the suspension of the bill a step in the right direction, but added that the whole idea needs to be completely scrapped.

“Of course, we would like to see this bill dropped,” Tara Joseph, president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday, stressing that worries won’t be erased as long as the possibility of passage remains.

“The main thing is just the notion that people could be extradited to China — that’s the elephant in the room, that’s what people are overwhelmingly concerned about.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: kelly olsen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, withdrawn, protests, week, drag, uncertainty, hong, bill, kong, china, thats, worries, passage, wont, work, looms


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Investors believe ‘this time it’s different’ — that worries billionaire investor Howard Marks

Howard Marks, Co-Chairman, Oaktree Capital. David A. Grogan | CNBCBillionaire investor and Oaktree Capital Management Co-Chairman Howard Marks is worried to hear investors say “this time it’s different” or openly wonder if the historic bull market and economic success “can only get better forever.” Here is the full list of hypotheses Marks scrutinized as written in his letter: There doesn’t have to be a recession. “The nine propositions reviewed above all represent variations on ‘things can only


Howard Marks, Co-Chairman, Oaktree Capital. David A. Grogan | CNBCBillionaire investor and Oaktree Capital Management Co-Chairman Howard Marks is worried to hear investors say “this time it’s different” or openly wonder if the historic bull market and economic success “can only get better forever.” Here is the full list of hypotheses Marks scrutinized as written in his letter: There doesn’t have to be a recession. “The nine propositions reviewed above all represent variations on ‘things can only
Investors believe ‘this time it’s different’ — that worries billionaire investor Howard Marks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, believe, howard, marks, different, investor, worries, billionaire, oaktree, longer, capital, economic, recovery, worrisome, success, investors, lead, wrote


Investors believe 'this time it's different' — that worries billionaire investor Howard Marks

Howard Marks, Co-Chairman, Oaktree Capital. David A. Grogan | CNBC

Billionaire investor and Oaktree Capital Management Co-Chairman Howard Marks is worried to hear investors say “this time it’s different” or openly wonder if the historic bull market and economic success “can only get better forever.” In a 12-page letter sent to Oaktree clients on Wednesday, Marks questioned nine financial theories he’s heard in recent meetings, including the notion that central banks policy can lead to evergreen market success and that economic recessions can be consistently delayed. Here is the full list of hypotheses Marks scrutinized as written in his letter: There doesn’t have to be a recession. Continuous quantitative easing can lead to permanent prosperity. Federal deficits can grow substantially larger without becoming problematic. National debt isn’t worrisome. We can have economic strength without inflation. Interest rates can remain “lower for longer.” The inverted yield curve needn’t have negative implications. Companies and stocks can thrive even in the absence of profits. Growth investing can continue to outperform value investing in perpetuity. “The nine propositions reviewed above all represent variations on ‘things can only get better forever,'” Marks wrote. “If they’re the ideas guiding investors today, that should be considered worrisome.” Though it’s always difficult to predict the timing of an economic downturn, Marks said that he’s always been confident that a recession is on the horizon at some point.

“We’ve always had economic cycles, and I believe we always will,” he wrote. “Eventually, favorable developments will lead people to engage in behavior premised on excessively optimistic assumptions, and eventually the over-optimism of those assumptions will be exposed and the excesses will correct in a period of negative growth.” “Very soon, the current recovery is bound to become the longest in U.S. history,” he continued. “However, I believe the odds are that it’s closer to the end than the beginning. … The recovery is likely to go on longer, but perhaps not much longer.” Marks, known for his prescient investment calls, correctly warned about the 2008 financial crisis and the dot-com bubble implosion. Oaktree Capital had $119 billion of assets under management as of March. Marks has a net worth of $2.1 billion, according to Forbes.

Do we want the Fed preventing recessions?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, believe, howard, marks, different, investor, worries, billionaire, oaktree, longer, capital, economic, recovery, worrisome, success, investors, lead, wrote


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Trump’s Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war

Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south w


Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesPresident Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south w
Trump’s Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, worries, products, mexican, threat, trumps, farm, tariffs, china, agricultural, pummeled, farmers, american, trade, war, tariff, goods


Trump's Mexico tariff threat worries US farmers already pummeled by China trade war

A farmer fills seed boxes on a Case IH Agricultural Equipment planter while planting corn in Princeton, Illinois, April 24, 2018. Daniel Acker | Bloomberg | Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s threatened 5% tariff on all Mexican imports could hit American farmers especially hard if Mexico retaliates with punitive duties on U.S. agricultural products. Farmers are already reeling from Trump’s drawn out trade war with China and fear further losses could be in their futures. “When you look at all the different products that the U.S. exports to Mexico, all those folks are getting nervous that retaliatory tariffs could certainly find their way onto their products,” said Veronica Nigh, an economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation, the nation’s largest farm sector organization. Mexico is considered one of the most lucrative markets for American agriculture products given its easy access and close proximity to the U.S, whether via rail, ship or truck. Even so, that hasn’t stopped other countries from chipping away at American agricultural dominance when it comes to supplying its neighbor to the south with grains, meats and other farm products. The U.S. exported $19 billion in agricultural exports to Mexico last year, making it the second-largest purchaser after Canada, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Mexico is the top market for U.S. corn, rice, dairy products, poultry, eggs, pecans and also a major buyer of American beef, pork, soybeans and wheat.

Farmer walks through his soy fields in Harvard, Illinois. Nova Safo | AFP | Getty Images

Frustrated with Central American migration, the White House last Thursday announced the U.S. plans to slap 5% tariffs on Mexican goods, including cars, beer, tequila, as well as fruits and vegetables. The duties would start June 10 and gradually increase to 25% on Oct. 1 unless Mexico “substantially stops the illegal inflow of aliens coming through its territory.” “If you put a tariff on imported goods, usually that price gets passed to consumers,” said Luis Ribera, an agricultural economist at Texas A&M University. “And you can expect that Mexico will retaliate one way or another.” Mexican officials in Washington this week as part of a diplomatic push to avert new tariffs are warning the levies won’t stop the flow of migrants. Talks between U.S. and Mexican officials on Wednesday failed to produce a deal, a senior administration official told NBC News. Trump slapped tariffs last year on imported steel and aluminum, resulting in Mexico imposing levies on $3 billion of U.S. goods, including a variety of agricultural products. The U.S. last month lifted metals tariffs against Mexico and Canada as part of a push to get ratification of the pending United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. However, Trump’s threat to impose new tariffs against Mexico over immigration puts USMCA in jeopardy and raises the risk of additional financial fallout for American farmers already hurting from the escalating trade war with China. The new USMCA is designed to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, a 25-year-old pact between the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

“Amid a perfect storm of challenges in farm country, we cannot afford the uncertainty this action would bring.” Lynn Chrisp president, National Corn Growers Associatiop


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, worries, products, mexican, threat, trumps, farm, tariffs, china, agricultural, pummeled, farmers, american, trade, war, tariff, goods


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Stocks rise slightly, but trade and economy worries persist

Stocks rose on Thursday, regaining some of the losses from the previous session, but the market’s gains were kept in check as worries over the global economy and trade lingered. The S&P 500 climbed 0.2% to 2,788.86 as the real estate and tech sectors outperformed. The major indexes had closed lower on Wednesday, with the Dow losing more than 200 points. Stock benchmarks briefly turned negative in afternoon trading, around the same time the 10-year Treasury yield gave back its earlier gains. Plun


Stocks rose on Thursday, regaining some of the losses from the previous session, but the market’s gains were kept in check as worries over the global economy and trade lingered. The S&P 500 climbed 0.2% to 2,788.86 as the real estate and tech sectors outperformed. The major indexes had closed lower on Wednesday, with the Dow losing more than 200 points. Stock benchmarks briefly turned negative in afternoon trading, around the same time the 10-year Treasury yield gave back its earlier gains. Plun
Stocks rise slightly, but trade and economy worries persist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economy, shares, tech, trading, yield, slightly, stocks, month, worries, sp, points, yields, persist, rise, trade


Stocks rise slightly, but trade and economy worries persist

Stocks rose on Thursday, regaining some of the losses from the previous session, but the market’s gains were kept in check as worries over the global economy and trade lingered.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 43.47 points higher at 25,169.88, led by McDonald’s and Coca-Cola. The S&P 500 climbed 0.2% to 2,788.86 as the real estate and tech sectors outperformed. The Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.3% to 7,567.72. The major indexes had closed lower on Wednesday, with the Dow losing more than 200 points.

Shares of software company Keysight Technologies led the tech sector higher, rising 11.3% on stronger-than-expected earnings.

Stock benchmarks briefly turned negative in afternoon trading, around the same time the 10-year Treasury yield gave back its earlier gains. The yield fell to 2.227%, near 20-month lows. The 10-year yield entered May trading above 2.5%.

Plunging yields this month, along with a yield curve inversion, have raised concerns about slowing economic growth. Investors typically see bonds as a safer alternative to riskier assets when economic worries arise.

“It definitely points to slower growth. That’s the primary driver right now in this risk-off environment we’ve experienced in the month of May,” said Ryan Nauman, market strategist at Informa Financial Intelligence, about the drop in yields. “People are rotating out of equities and into Treasurys for that defensive play.”

Bank shares followed yields lower. The SPDR KS&P Bank ETF (KBE) dropped 1.5% as Bank of America shares lost 2.1%. J.P. Morgan Chase also declined 1.1%.

The S&P 500 is down more than 5% this month and remains below 2,800 — a key level watched by traders — for the first time since late March.

There are “insufficient signs of bottoming” in the market, said Mark Newton, managing member at Newton Advisors, in a note. “Yet this will all take time. Until then, downside targets should take another 3-5 trading days with the 2722-35 [range] having significance for S&P. Closes back up above 2800, however, would be something to watch carefully.”

The protracted trade dispute between China and the U.S. also weighed on markets. A senior Chinese diplomat ramped up the rhetoric overnight. Also, China has halted soy purchases from the U.S., according to Bloomberg News.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economy, shares, tech, trading, yield, slightly, stocks, month, worries, sp, points, yields, persist, rise, trade


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Dollar near flat, heading for fourth straight month of gains

The dollar was little changed on Thursday, on track to post a fourth straight month of gains, as the trade stand-off between China and the United States prompted traders to put money into perceived safe currencies including the greenback. Safe-haven demand lifted the dollar to a 2-year high against a basket of currencies last week. Appetite for the greenback was somewhat curbed on Thursday as Wall Street stabilized following steep losses due to the trade worries and U.S. bond yields briefly rose


The dollar was little changed on Thursday, on track to post a fourth straight month of gains, as the trade stand-off between China and the United States prompted traders to put money into perceived safe currencies including the greenback. Safe-haven demand lifted the dollar to a 2-year high against a basket of currencies last week. Appetite for the greenback was somewhat curbed on Thursday as Wall Street stabilized following steep losses due to the trade worries and U.S. bond yields briefly rose
Dollar near flat, heading for fourth straight month of gains Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, yen, greenback, currencies, dollar, euro, fourth, week, heading, worries, gains, straight, month, lower, flat, trade


Dollar near flat, heading for fourth straight month of gains

The dollar was little changed on Thursday, on track to post a fourth straight month of gains, as the trade stand-off between China and the United States prompted traders to put money into perceived safe currencies including the greenback.

Safe-haven demand lifted the dollar to a 2-year high against a basket of currencies last week. Appetite for the greenback was somewhat curbed on Thursday as Wall Street stabilized following steep losses due to the trade worries and U.S. bond yields briefly rose before resuming their recent fall.

The euro and sterling held above key support levels at $1.11 and $1.26, respectively, also restraining the greenback’s momentum, analysts said.

“With the U.S.-China trade situation, people don’t want to do anything until there’s a resolution,” Joseph Trevisani, senior analyst at FX Street, said of this week’s light volume and tight trading ranges.

In late U.S. trading, an index that tracks the dollar against six major currencies was down -0.01% at 98.151. It reached 98.371 a week ago, its strongest since May 2017.

The S&P 500 was down 0.08%, wiping out initial gains, while the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note yield was 1.2 basis points lower at 2.224%, reversing an earlier rise.

The dollar index has increased 0.76% in May, putting it on track for four straight months of gains. Its strength has persisted even as traders have increased their bets on multiple rate cuts by the Federal Reserve.

The greenback will likely extend its monthly winning streak against the euro, which began in January. Signs of a sagging euro zone economy, together with worries about the rise of euro-sceptic political parties within EU member countries, have hurt the zone’s common currency.

The euro was up 0.04% at $1.1135, within striking distance of $1.11055 hit a week ago, which was a two-year low. The dollar has also remained resilient against the yen, despite the risk-averse environment.

The greenback was 0.05% lower at 109.535 yen, staying above a two-week low set on Wednesday. Analysts said the yen, a safe-haven currency backed by Japan’s status as the world’s biggest creditor nation, remained relatively weak because of domestic demand for dollars.

“As there’s persistent yen selling and dollar buying from Japanese investors when the rate approaches the 109.10 yen per dollar level, it’s not easy for the yen to rise above the 109 level,” said Yukio Ishizuki, senior currency strategist at Daiwa Securities.

Sterling was poised for the biggest monthly drop against the dollar in a year as the imminent departure of Theresa May as prime minister deepened fears about a chaotic exit for Britain from the European Union.

On Thursday, the pound was 0.13% lower at $1.261, while the euro was up 0.17% at 88.31 pence.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, near, yen, greenback, currencies, dollar, euro, fourth, week, heading, worries, gains, straight, month, lower, flat, trade


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US oil drops 3.8% to $56.59 per barrel on small supply decline, trade war worries

Oil prices fell sharply on Thursday on a smaller-than-expected decline in U.S. crude inventories and fears of a global economic slowdown due to the U.S.-China trade war. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude settles down 3.8%, at $56.59 per barrel. “An escalating U.S.-China trade war represents a risk to oil markets,” Bernstein Energy said in a note. Bernstein Energy said under “a full-blown trade war scenario,” global oil demand would grow by just 0.7% this year, half of current estimates. S


Oil prices fell sharply on Thursday on a smaller-than-expected decline in U.S. crude inventories and fears of a global economic slowdown due to the U.S.-China trade war. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude settles down 3.8%, at $56.59 per barrel. “An escalating U.S.-China trade war represents a risk to oil markets,” Bernstein Energy said in a note. Bernstein Energy said under “a full-blown trade war scenario,” global oil demand would grow by just 0.7% this year, half of current estimates. S
US oil drops 3.8% to $56.59 per barrel on small supply decline, trade war worries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, crude, oil, week, 5659, supply, barrel, war, prices, worries, small, iran, energy, decline, drops, trade


US oil drops 3.8% to $56.59 per barrel on small supply decline, trade war worries

A gas flare on an oil production platform is seen alongside an Iranian flag in the Gulf.

Oil prices fell sharply on Thursday on a smaller-than-expected decline in U.S. crude inventories and fears of a global economic slowdown due to the U.S.-China trade war.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said crude stockpiles fell nearly 300,000 barrels last week, less than the 900,000-barrel decline analysts forecast in a Reuters poll and well below the 5.3 million-barrel drawdown the American Petroleum Institute (API) reported late Wednesday.

The decline last week reduced crude stocks from their highest since July 2017 seen the previous week, but at 476.5 million barrels, they were still about 5% above the five-year average for this time of year.

“The oil inventories report has added to the bearish sentiment prevailing in today’s trading session,” said Abhishek Kumar, head of analytics at Interfax Energy in London, noting “Demand-side concerns emerging from the ongoing U.S.-China trade war are expected to remain the key driver weighing on oil prices.”

Brent futures fell $2.88, or 3.9%, to $66.54 a barrel. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude settles down 3.8%, at $56.59 per barrel.

If the contracts close at their current levels, it would be the lowest settle for Brent since March 22 and WTI since March 12.

The bigger decline in Brent cut the global benchmark’s premium over WTI to around $10 per barrel, down from a more than four-year high of $11.59 on Wednesday.

“An escalating U.S.-China trade war represents a risk to oil markets,” Bernstein Energy said in a note.

A senior Chinese diplomat compared trade actions from Washington to “naked economic terrorism.”

Bernstein Energy said under “a full-blown trade war scenario,” global oil demand would grow by just 0.7% this year, half of current estimates.

Because of weakening demand, Bernstein said any upside for oil markets was capped despite relatively tight supply.

Oil prices have been supported this year by output cuts from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other major producers, as well as by falling supplies from OPEC members Iran and Venezuela due to U.S. sanctions.

Iranian May crude exports dropped to less than half of April levels at around 400,000 barrels per day (bpd) after the United States tightened sanctions on Tehran’s main source of income. Iran needs to export at least 1.5-2.0 million bpd of crude to balance its books.

“We see an abundance of escalation risks in large part because the U.S. sanctions are subjecting Iran to almost unprecedented economic pain,” said Helima Croft, managing director of RBC Capital Markets.

Arab leaders gather in Saudi Arabia on Thursday for emergency summits that Riyadh hopes will deliver a strong message to Iran that regional powers will defend their interests against any threat following attacks on Gulf oil assets this month.

As Arab leaders gathered in Saudi Arabia, the U.S. Iran envoy said the United States will respond with military force if its interests are attacked by Iran.

Many analysts also expect OPEC-led supply cuts to be extended until the end of 2019 as the group wants to prevent oil prices from falling back to levels seen in late 2018 when Brent slumped to $50 per barrel.

Since OPEC and its allies started withholding supply in January, oil prices have risen by about 30%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wti, crude, oil, week, 5659, supply, barrel, war, prices, worries, small, iran, energy, decline, drops, trade


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Mondelez isn’t feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says

Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday. “If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in e


Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday. “If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in e
Mondelez isn’t feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, feeling, snacking, mondelez, dont, isnt, food, consumers, worries, growing, van, stock, global, heat, consumer, ceo, market, really


Mondelez isn't feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says

Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday.

“If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “I would say as it relates to their overall life circumstances and how the middle class feels … the lower class — they don’t feel well at the moment.”

Geopolitical issues, such as Great Britain’s impending breakup with the European Union, is causing uncertainty and weighing on overall consumer confidence, Van de Put said.

But the packaged food company has found success by adapting to changing consumer tastes, especially those of millennials, said Van de Put, who has led the company since the end of 2017. That demographic of shoppers has demanded more and more snack products, he added.

“They’re snacking, well, because it’s a lifestyle change,” he said. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. They want to sort of fuel themselves, and they eat 7 times a day, so snacking is really growing as a habit and also the market is growing as a consequence of that.”

The Illinois-based parent of Nabisco, Oreo, Philadelphia Cream Cheese and other recognizable brands recorded nearly 4% organic sales growth and more than 8% growth in emerging markets in its April quarterly earnings report. The stock has rallied nearly 30% this year.

Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in each market. Take China, where the snack manufacturer successfully rolled out an Oreo campaign and entered the wafers segment that connected with the local customer.

“I don’t think consumers … want to eat the same thing all over the world, and we’re trying to adapt to that,” Van de Put said. “We try to get local insight and talk to [consumers], listen to them, observe their snacking behaviors and they will tell you if they like it or they don’t like it and from there we develop our product.”

Van de Put hinted at more growth on the horizon in the domestic market with the company’s premium cookie Tate’s, which it began selling after acquiring Tate’s Bake Shop in May 2018 for $500 million. The fast-growing brand also makes other baked goods.

“It’s on fire. It’s really growing very fast. It still isn’t in every store in the U.S., so it’s huge potential,” he said. “And in the store it’s in, it doesn’t have enough space. It needs more space because it’s out of stock all the time.”

Shares of Mondelez fell 2.23% during the session Tuesday. The stock is $2 off its all-time high, set in mid-May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, feeling, snacking, mondelez, dont, isnt, food, consumers, worries, growing, van, stock, global, heat, consumer, ceo, market, really


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US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more


Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more
US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ongoing, higher, itpoliticsread, trump, war, worries, trade, amid, testify, treasury, tick, mueller, private, investigation, robert, wants, yields, talk, russian


US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…

Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith
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US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more


Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it… Politicsread more
US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ongoing, higher, itpoliticsread, trump, war, worries, trade, amid, testify, treasury, tick, mueller, private, investigation, robert, wants, yields, talk, russian


US Treasury yields tick higher amid ongoing trade war worries

Robert Mueller wants to testify in private before Congress,…

Special counsel Robert Mueller wants to talk to Congress about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election, but he wants to do it…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith
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Asia markets mixed as investors worry over US-China trade tensions

Asia Pacific markets traded mixed Friday, as worries over trade tensions between the United States and China weighed on investor sentiment. MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 0.67% in the afternoon. Mainland Chinese markets were mixed: The Shanghai composite closed flat while the Shenzhen composite fell 0.48%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index added about 0.4% in late afternoon trade. In Japan, the benchmark Nikkei 225 fell 0.16% to 21,117.22 while the Topix index was


Asia Pacific markets traded mixed Friday, as worries over trade tensions between the United States and China weighed on investor sentiment. MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 0.67% in the afternoon. Mainland Chinese markets were mixed: The Shanghai composite closed flat while the Shenzhen composite fell 0.48%. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index added about 0.4% in late afternoon trade. In Japan, the benchmark Nikkei 225 fell 0.16% to 21,117.22 while the Topix index was
Asia markets mixed as investors worry over US-China trade tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: weizhen tan saheli roy choudhury, weizhen tan, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tradein, index, weighed, fell, composite, worry, investors, trade, worries, mixed, markets, uschina, united, asia, japan, tensions


Asia markets mixed as investors worry over US-China trade tensions

Asia Pacific markets traded mixed Friday, as worries over trade tensions between the United States and China weighed on investor sentiment.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 0.67% in the afternoon.

Mainland Chinese markets were mixed: The Shanghai composite closed flat while the Shenzhen composite fell 0.48%.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index added about 0.4% in late afternoon trade.

In Japan, the benchmark Nikkei 225 fell 0.16% to 21,117.22 while the Topix index was fractionally higher at 1,541.21. South Korea’s Kospi fell 0.69% to 2,045.31.

Australia’s ASX 200 declined 0.55% to 6,456, with the financial subindex down 0.45%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: weizhen tan saheli roy choudhury, weizhen tan, saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tradein, index, weighed, fell, composite, worry, investors, trade, worries, mixed, markets, uschina, united, asia, japan, tensions


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