October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies


October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market. This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.” There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies
October can be spooky for investors — here’s why experts say not to worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


October can be spooky for investors — here's why experts say not to worry

October has a spooky reputation with investors, but experts say there’s no need to fear the stock market.

This month has sometimes been horrifying, historically: Over the past century, three of the darkest days on Wall Street all happened during October.

“The big one is October 1987, when the Dow plunged 22% in a single day,” says Jason Lambert, the president and CEO of Northwest Financial & Tax Solutions, near Portland, Oregon. That day, now known as “Black Monday,” “was the worst single-day drop, percentage-wise, in history.”

The Great Depression began after a market crash in October 1929 and the financial crisis that sparked the Great Recession started with an October market meltdown in 2008.

There’s another reason October has a bad reputation, says Lambert: “Market volatility, historically, is higher” in October. “Volatility implies fear,” he says, “even if it doesn’t mean that the market is moving up or down.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: sam becker, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, say, spooky, reputation, worst, historically, fear, volatility, worry, great, market, day, heres, lambert, financial, experts


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Consumers are really starting to worry about the trade war

U.S. consumers are getting increasingly anxious about the trade war with China despite a recent thaw in the tensions ahead of the trade talks next month. The University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers showed in September that a near-record number of consumers cited trade policies as a negative factor weighing on the economy. “Trade policies have had the greatest negative impact on consumers, with a near record one-third of all consumers negatively mentioning trade policies in September when a


U.S. consumers are getting increasingly anxious about the trade war with China despite a recent thaw in the tensions ahead of the trade talks next month. The University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers showed in September that a near-record number of consumers cited trade policies as a negative factor weighing on the economy. “Trade policies have had the greatest negative impact on consumers, with a near record one-third of all consumers negatively mentioning trade policies in September when a
Consumers are really starting to worry about the trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, starting, negative, trade, economic, consumers, china, really, war, university, policies, tensions, worry, surveys


Consumers are really starting to worry about the trade war

U.S. consumers are getting increasingly anxious about the trade war with China despite a recent thaw in the tensions ahead of the trade talks next month.

The University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers showed in September that a near-record number of consumers cited trade policies as a negative factor weighing on the economy.

“Trade policies have had the greatest negative impact on consumers, with a near record one-third of all consumers negatively mentioning trade policies in September when asked to explain in their own words the factors underlying their economic expectations,” Richard Curtin, chief economist of the Surveys of Consumers, said in a statement.

The result came as the U.S. and China are slated to resume trade talks on Oct. 10 in Washington. Tensions have somewhat eased ahead of the negotiations as China confirmed the country had purchased a “considerable” amount of U.S. soybeans and pork products. President Donald Trump had also delayed some tariffs by two weeks at China’s request.

Still, the two economic superpowers have many structural issues they have yet to sort out. White House trade advisor Peter Navarro previously said these issues include cyber intrusion into U.S. business networks, forced technology transfer, intellectual property theft and currency manipulation.

An index of consumer confidence rose to 93.2 in September from 89.8 in August, according to the University of Michigan.

“Despite the high levels of confidence, consumers have also expressed rising levels of economic uncertainty,” Curtin said. “Some of these concerns are rooted in partisanship, some due to conditions in the global economy (Brexit, Iran, Saudi Arabia, China), and some are tied to domestic economic policies.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, starting, negative, trade, economic, consumers, china, really, war, university, policies, tensions, worry, surveys


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Google’s cloud chief says US-China trade war has not affected sales growth

The trade war between the U.S. and China hasn’t had an effect on Google’s fast-growing cloud business, according to Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian. In a CNBC interview at the Sibos financial services conference in London Thursday, Kurian said the cloud business is seeing “enormous growth around the world,” adding it has “not been affected by the trade war.” Kurian pointed to Google Cloud’s “large presence” in Hong Kong and Taiwan and didn’t rule out further expansion into China’s cloud market. C


The trade war between the U.S. and China hasn’t had an effect on Google’s fast-growing cloud business, according to Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian. In a CNBC interview at the Sibos financial services conference in London Thursday, Kurian said the cloud business is seeing “enormous growth around the world,” adding it has “not been affected by the trade war.” Kurian pointed to Google Cloud’s “large presence” in Hong Kong and Taiwan and didn’t rule out further expansion into China’s cloud market. C
Google’s cloud chief says US-China trade war has not affected sales growth Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, kurian, services, uschina, sales, growth, googles, chief, worry, cloud, trade, affected, world, china, war, google, chinese


Google's cloud chief says US-China trade war has not affected sales growth

The trade war between the U.S. and China hasn’t had an effect on Google’s fast-growing cloud business, according to Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian.

In a CNBC interview at the Sibos financial services conference in London Thursday, Kurian said the cloud business is seeing “enormous growth around the world,” adding it has “not been affected by the trade war.”

Kurian pointed to Google Cloud’s “large presence” in Hong Kong and Taiwan and didn’t rule out further expansion into China’s cloud market.

“We continue to monitor the demand for our technology from Chinese customers,” he said.

Cloud services in China are currently dominated by Chinese tech giants like Alibaba and Tencent. Asked whether he sees competition from those local players, Kurian replied, “we worry about everybody.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, kurian, services, uschina, sales, growth, googles, chief, worry, cloud, trade, affected, world, china, war, google, chinese


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NBA star-turned-businessman Shaq reveals the worst investment he ever made

Basketball legend-turned-business mogul Shaquille O’Neal told CNBC on Wednesday about the worst investment he ever made. A guy who owned this paper company said he had all these deals in all the schools and with the government. While the former basketball star has led a successful career as an investor since retiring from the NBA in 2011, he said it wasn’t an easy transition. “Once I stopped focusing on [money], I became a little bit more successful,” O’Neal told CNBC. The former basketball star


Basketball legend-turned-business mogul Shaquille O’Neal told CNBC on Wednesday about the worst investment he ever made. A guy who owned this paper company said he had all these deals in all the schools and with the government. While the former basketball star has led a successful career as an investor since retiring from the NBA in 2011, he said it wasn’t an easy transition. “Once I stopped focusing on [money], I became a little bit more successful,” O’Neal told CNBC. The former basketball star
NBA star-turned-businessman Shaq reveals the worst investment he ever made Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jasmine kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, worst, shaq, told, reveals, investment, basketball, worry, star, nba, paper, starturnedbusinessman, successful, oneal, turned


NBA star-turned-businessman Shaq reveals the worst investment he ever made

Basketball legend-turned-business mogul Shaquille O’Neal told CNBC on Wednesday about the worst investment he ever made.

O’Neal mentioned an unnamed paper company that allegedly promised him fraudulent deals.

A guy who owned this paper company said he had all these deals in all the schools and with the government. … Turned out to be a scam, ” he said on “Power Lunch. ”

While the former basketball star has led a successful career as an investor since retiring from the NBA in 2011, he said it wasn’t an easy transition.

O’Neal admitted that when he was younger, he used to invest in businesses that “turned out to be a scam.”

“When I first came into [the business industry], I lost a lot of money in the ‘get rich quick schemes.'” he said.

O’Neal added that “from [age] 19 to 26, anybody could come to my office, tell me the deal and I would take it right away. No research. No due diligence.”

However, after having learned from his past mistakes, the four-time NBA champion said he started “listening to people” and working with “people [who] are much smarter than me.”

He referred to Bill Gates and Roger Enrico, former CEO of Pepsi, as “friends” who talked to him about smart strategies in investing.

“Once I stopped focusing on [money], I became a little bit more successful,” O’Neal told CNBC.

The business magnate has now developed his own principles of investing. The 15-time NBA All-Star said he has to genuinely “like the product” and “understand it” to promote, invest and “really believe in it.”

O’Neal also said, “My method in dealing with businesses is I never worry about the problem. I worry about the solution.”

The former basketball star wants to “make investments on things that just make people happy” and continue to “partner with people that are very smart.”

O’Neal recently partnered with an Atlanta start-up called Steady, which is an app that lists part-time and hourly work opportunities for users.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: jasmine kim
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, worst, shaq, told, reveals, investment, basketball, worry, star, nba, paper, starturnedbusinessman, successful, oneal, turned


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Wall Street analysts worry these stocks are caught in the deepening US-China trade war

Wall Street analysts are scrambling to asses the damage in the latest fallout in the trade war between the U.S. and China. CNBC did a deep dive through the most recent Wall Street research to see what stocks analysts fear will be most hurt by the latest tariff. They include names such as Dollar Tree, Abercrombie & Fitch, Rio Tinto, O’Reilly Automotive, Michaels Companies, Advanced Micro Devices, & Nvidia. This week, Dollar Tree was the subject of a downgrade by Deutsche Bank analysts. Here’s wha


Wall Street analysts are scrambling to asses the damage in the latest fallout in the trade war between the U.S. and China. CNBC did a deep dive through the most recent Wall Street research to see what stocks analysts fear will be most hurt by the latest tariff. They include names such as Dollar Tree, Abercrombie & Fitch, Rio Tinto, O’Reilly Automotive, Michaels Companies, Advanced Micro Devices, & Nvidia. This week, Dollar Tree was the subject of a downgrade by Deutsche Bank analysts. Here’s wha
Wall Street analysts worry these stocks are caught in the deepening US-China trade war Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deepening, worry, trade, retailer, war, tree, wall, tariff, caught, stocks, analysts, uschina, street, weeks, start, dollar, times


Wall Street analysts worry these stocks are caught in the deepening US-China trade war

Wall Street analysts are scrambling to asses the damage in the latest fallout in the trade war between the U.S. and China.

President Donald Trump recently announced that a new 10% tariff would go into effect on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods beginning September 1.

The S&P 500 is down around 2% since then and analysts fear the ratcheting up of trade tensions along with the new tariff will lead to trouble for a wide range of stocks they cover.

CNBC did a deep dive through the most recent Wall Street research to see what stocks analysts fear will be most hurt by the latest tariff. They include names such as Dollar Tree, Abercrombie & Fitch, Rio Tinto, O’Reilly Automotive, Michaels Companies, Advanced Micro Devices, & Nvidia.

Retail is widely believed to be one of the sectors most impacted because the latest round of tariffs target clothing and other consumer goods according to many analysts.

This week, Dollar Tree was the subject of a downgrade by Deutsche Bank analysts. The firm said that while it liked the discount retailer, it couldn’t ignore the looming tariff threat.

“We still view [Dollar Tree] as a high quality retailer with a well regarded management team … However, we can’t ignore choppy execution at Family Dollar, and our refreshed tariff math … shows material downside risk to estimates, with [Dollar Tree] among the most vulnerable companies in our coverage,” they said.

The new tariff couldn’t come at a worse time for multinational semiconductor companies like Advanced Micro Devices & Nvidia.

“Supplier shipment times already in the critical window,” Mizuho analysts said.

“The sudden announcement does not leave much time for suppliers to build inventories or pull-in as shipment times are 2-4 weeks and the tariff start is 4 weeks away. … We believe normal sea shipping times are 2 weeks from China to the West coast to 4 weeks to the East coast NY ports,” the analysts said.

“Unless the U.S administration gives a waiver to shipments already enroute before the Sep-1st start date or where orders have been placed, theoretically we could see tariff impact on many of the shipments start sooner.”

Recently, analysts at Credit Suisse attended an investor day for auto parts retailer O’Reilly Automotive. While the brokerage said it came away impressed from the meetings, it admitted it still couldn’t recommend the stock.

“The near to medium term story includes a challenging recipe of using price increases to offset tariffs and SG&A cost pressures, but with added uncertainty now on elasticity and how the consumer will respond to the next rounds of price increases. That, combined with consensus 2020 estimates that embed improving operating margins, and the stock’s premium valuation, keeps us on the sidelines,” they said in their note to clients.

Here’s what else analysts are saying about stocks caught in the U.S.-China trade war:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deepening, worry, trade, retailer, war, tree, wall, tariff, caught, stocks, analysts, uschina, street, weeks, start, dollar, times


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Steve Eisman says Hong Kong protests are his biggest worry with economy, a possible ‘black swan’

His biggest worry however is the Hong Kong protests, which he says could endanger any kind of trade deal with China and hurt the global economy. “I think the potential black swan, if there is a black swan right now, is what’s happening in Hong Kong right now,” said Eisman on CNBC’s Power Lunch. “If things escalate even further in Hong Kong, that would have a real impact back on the global economy.” The managing director and senior portfolio manager at Neuberger Berman said the protests in Hong K


His biggest worry however is the Hong Kong protests, which he says could endanger any kind of trade deal with China and hurt the global economy. “I think the potential black swan, if there is a black swan right now, is what’s happening in Hong Kong right now,” said Eisman on CNBC’s Power Lunch. “If things escalate even further in Hong Kong, that would have a real impact back on the global economy.” The managing director and senior portfolio manager at Neuberger Berman said the protests in Hong K
Steve Eisman says Hong Kong protests are his biggest worry with economy, a possible ‘black swan’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protests, black, hong, investor, global, steve, right, eisman, worry, possible, kong, trade, china, swan, economy, financial


Steve Eisman says Hong Kong protests are his biggest worry with economy, a possible 'black swan'

Steve Eisman, the investor of “Big Short” fame, is not worried about the American financial system saying it is sound and that there is little risk of a systemic crisis like the one he effectively bet against more than a decade ago.

His biggest worry however is the Hong Kong protests, which he says could endanger any kind of trade deal with China and hurt the global economy.

“I think the potential black swan, if there is a black swan right now, is what’s happening in Hong Kong right now,” said Eisman on CNBC’s Power Lunch. “If things escalate even further in Hong Kong, that would have a real impact back on the global economy.”

Hundreds of thousands of protesters have taken to Hong Kong’s streets since early June, due to opposition to a now-suspended extradition law that would have allowed people in the city to be extradited to Mainland China. These protests demonstrate the large discontent the people have for the city’s government. The proposal, which is suspended but not fully withdrawn, mark the people of Hong Kong’s call for full democracy.

Black Swan events are difficult to predict and particularly damaging because of that. The financial crisis is considered one of those events.

The managing director and senior portfolio manager at Neuberger Berman said the protests in Hong Kong “seem to be escalating.”

“The people who are protesting are not backing down, the Chinese government doesn’t seem to be backing down, so if cooler heads don’t prevail it’s possible things in Hong Kong could get very ugly.”

Eisman said conflict in Hong Kong could impact the trade war between the U.S. and China and could ripple through the global markets.

“That is not going to be a positive in terms of negotiating a trade deal between the United States and China, its not going to be a positive at all for the global markets,” said Eisman.

The U.S. and China have been tied up in trade negotiations for over a year. Since the Chinese trade officials reneged on a nearly finished trade deal in May, the U.S. and China have engaged in a tariff fight and more recently a currency war, causing the markets to have their worst day of the year on Monday, weighing on investor and business sentiment.

“That’s actually what I’m worried about the most right now, because every weekend we’ve got this drama where the people of Hong Kong are having protests in the millions and its starting to get very violent,” said Eisman.

Eisman an investor known for predicting the financial crisis as depicted in “The Big Short” book and movie. He is currently betting again shares of Zillow.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-08  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protests, black, hong, investor, global, steve, right, eisman, worry, possible, kong, trade, china, swan, economy, financial


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China’s central bank has one less worry after the Fed’s rate cut, analysts say

Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs


Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty ImagesThe U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs
China’s central bank has one less worry after the Fed’s rate cut, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, analysts, say, china, peoples, zhu, chinas, fed, bank, policy, central, yield, measures, worry, cut, feds


China's central bank has one less worry after the Fed's rate cut, analysts say

Zhang Peng | LightRocket | Getty Images

The U.S. Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut takes some pressure off China’s central bank, amid the multitude of challenges it already faces to keep the economy growing steadily. The People’s Bank of China is unlikely to respond with major changes to its monetary policy, analysts said. Instead, the central bank can worry less about the key U.S. dollar-yuan exchange rate, amid drawn-out trade tensions between the two countries, a slowdown in economic growth and criticism China keeps its currency artificially weak to boost exports. Rates overall are in a downward trend, Zhu Chaoping, a global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Asset Management said in Mandarin, according to a CNBC translation. Among multiple policy measures, the People’s Bank of China can step back on foreign exchange policy and put more focus on other measures, such as increasing financing to small and medium-sized enterprises, Zhu said.

The Fed cut its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday New York time for the first time since 2008. However, contrary to market expectations that the move was a signal that there will be further rate cuts ahead, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell called the decision a “midcycle adjustment to policy.” Some investors interpreted the move as indicating tighter monetary policy than expected, and major U.S. stock indexes fell by more than 1% on Powell’s commentary. The rate-sensitive 2-year Treasury yield jumped to its highest since late May, while the 10-year Treasury yield fell, causing the so-called yield curve to flatten. The U.S. dollar index hit its highest in more than two years. Matt Toms, chief investment officer of fixed income at Voya Investment Management, said the market moves were likely an overreaction. “We would look to the Fed to come out and talk more about the lack of inflation,” he said. “That should help weaken the dollar, steepen the yield curve.”

The greater challenge is the (Chinese) central bank has many goals and needs many policies to achieve these goals. This is a lot more complex than the Fed. Zhu Chaoping JP Morgan Asset Management

On Thursday, the People’s Bank of China set the yuan’s midpoint slightly weaker against the greenback, at 6.8938. The currency has remained in a relatively narrow range this year, about half a percent weaker against the dollar for the year so far, according to Wind Information. Ma Yan, researcher at Chinese brokerage Nanhua Futures, said it expects greater pressure on the yuan, but noted the economy is not doing so poorly as to warrant a significant devaluation. In a Chinese statement translated by CNBC, Ma also said that if economic growth slows in the third or fourth quarter, a central bank cut to the reserve requirement ratio — or the amount that banks need to set aside as reserves — is a possibility. Some other loosening measures may also be possible.

More complex for China


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, analysts, say, china, peoples, zhu, chinas, fed, bank, policy, central, yield, measures, worry, cut, feds


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Here’s what major analysts are predicting will happen with Netflix earnings after the bell

Reed Hastings attends Reed Hastings panel during Netflix ‘See What’s Next’ event at Villa Miani on April 18, 2018 in Rome, Italy. Earnings season is underway and there’s no shortage of story lines when Netflix reports its second quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday. Wall Street analysts say they’ll be squarely focused on key metrics like cash, content, and comments on upcoming competition from Disney and HBO Max. “Wall of worry” refers to when a company runs into a stumbling block in the


Reed Hastings attends Reed Hastings panel during Netflix ‘See What’s Next’ event at Villa Miani on April 18, 2018 in Rome, Italy. Earnings season is underway and there’s no shortage of story lines when Netflix reports its second quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday. Wall Street analysts say they’ll be squarely focused on key metrics like cash, content, and comments on upcoming competition from Disney and HBO Max. “Wall of worry” refers to when a company runs into a stumbling block in the
Here’s what major analysts are predicting will happen with Netflix earnings after the bell Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competition, wall, earnings, upcoming, analysts, stocks, analyst, heres, second, bell, predicting, worry, refers, happen, netflix, major


Here's what major analysts are predicting will happen with Netflix earnings after the bell

Reed Hastings attends Reed Hastings panel during Netflix ‘See What’s Next’ event at Villa Miani on April 18, 2018 in Rome, Italy.

Earnings season is underway and there’s no shortage of story lines when Netflix reports its second quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday. Wall Street analysts say they’ll be squarely focused on key metrics like cash, content, and comments on upcoming competition from Disney and HBO Max.

The company has recently taken heat from analysts over its spending on content as well as its recent loss of comedy shows, ‘Friends,’ and ‘The Office.’

The streaming giant is up 37% year to date, that’s second only to Facebook among the so-called FAANG stocks. But it’s also underperformed the market over the past year, concerning analysts. FAANG refers to a group of internet and tech stocks including Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google.

Despite the concerns, most analysts are still urging clients to buy into the report.

“NFLX remains one of our top picks, and while the competition/price increase-related churn ‘wall of worry’ could take a few quarters to disprove, we think it presents a good buying opportunity,” J.P. Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth said.

“Wall of worry” refers to when a company runs into a stumbling block in the market causing temporary uncertainty.

Content and competition issues are mostly “noise,” according to analysts at Bank of America

“We see most near term risks for Netflix as fleeting, with structural growth expected to hold,” they said.

“We would see any dip around these worries as an enhanced buying opportunity because we do not see Disney/HBO as the competition and we expect, as has happened before, any price hike driven increase in churn to be short-lived as consumers come back for Netflix’s content.”

However, one analyst says he’s keeping his sell rating, “until we see progress.”

“Should cash burn stabilize and reverse trajectory, we are prepared to reconsider our underperform rating,” Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter said.

Here’s what major analysts are saying about Netflix’s upcoming earnings report:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, competition, wall, earnings, upcoming, analysts, stocks, analyst, heres, second, bell, predicting, worry, refers, happen, netflix, major


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Warren Buffett doesn’t worry about how his investments perform year over year—here’s why you shouldn’t either

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett doesn’t care how well the companies he’s invested in did last year — he’s more concerned with how they perform over decades. “We’ve made a lot of money in stocks over time,” he told CNBC’s Becky Quick during an interview on “Squawk Box” in February. Buffett chooses companies that he believes will perform well long-term, regardless of how they’re doing at any given point. “We sort of know it when we see it,” Buffett said during the Berkshire Hathaway 2017 Ann


Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett doesn’t care how well the companies he’s invested in did last year — he’s more concerned with how they perform over decades. “We’ve made a lot of money in stocks over time,” he told CNBC’s Becky Quick during an interview on “Squawk Box” in February. Buffett chooses companies that he believes will perform well long-term, regardless of how they’re doing at any given point. “We sort of know it when we see it,” Buffett said during the Berkshire Hathaway 2017 Ann
Warren Buffett doesn’t worry about how his investments perform year over year—here’s why you shouldn’t either Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, quick, hes, money, shouldnt, investments, theyre, companies, perform, warren, yearheres, doesnt, buffett, berkshire, told, hathaway


Warren Buffett doesn't worry about how his investments perform year over year—here's why you shouldn't either

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett doesn’t care how well the companies he’s invested in did last year — he’s more concerned with how they perform over decades.

“We’ve made a lot of money in stocks over time,” he told CNBC’s Becky Quick during an interview on “Squawk Box” in February. “But there’s been years when we’ve lost money, too.”

While he expects Berkshire to come out ahead over time, “we haven’t got the faintest idea what years we’ll be up or down,” he says.

Buffett chooses companies that he believes will perform well long-term, regardless of how they’re doing at any given point. This “buy and hold” strategy is one he has reiterated time and time again. When deciding if he should put money into a company, longevity has always been a major consideration.

“We sort of know it when we see it,” Buffett said during the Berkshire Hathaway 2017 Annual Shareholders Meeting. “It would tend to be a business that for one reason or another we can look out five or 10 or 20 years, and decide that the competitive advantage that it had at the present would last over that period.”

Because of that, he doesn’t pay attention to the news when making investment decisions.

“I’m not buying them because I think they’re going to go up the next day or the next week,” he told Quick in February. “We watch the prices of things we do more than current events.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, quick, hes, money, shouldnt, investments, theyre, companies, perform, warren, yearheres, doesnt, buffett, berkshire, told, hathaway


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Apple’s iTunes is dying, but don’t worry — your music will live on, and you’ll still be able to use iTunes gift cards

The app as you know it — regular ol’ iTunes — is being replaced by three apps, including Apple Music, Apple TV and Podcasts. But movies and TV shows you purchased over the years will now live in a separate app called Apple TV. Podcasts will live in a separate podcasts app. “The iTunes Store will remain the same as it is today on iOS, PC, and Apple TV. But the point is: Even though iTunes is going away, your music and iTunes gift cards are not.


The app as you know it — regular ol’ iTunes — is being replaced by three apps, including Apple Music, Apple TV and Podcasts. But movies and TV shows you purchased over the years will now live in a separate app called Apple TV. Podcasts will live in a separate podcasts app. “The iTunes Store will remain the same as it is today on iOS, PC, and Apple TV. But the point is: Even though iTunes is going away, your music and iTunes gift cards are not.
Apple’s iTunes is dying, but don’t worry — your music will live on, and you’ll still be able to use iTunes gift cards Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, apples, music, gift, app, tv, live, youll, itunes, mac, store, cards, separate, dying, dont, podcasts, worry


Apple's iTunes is dying, but don't worry — your music will live on, and you'll still be able to use iTunes gift cards

When Apple launches its new Mac software, macOS Catalina, this fall, you’re going to see a lot of changes to iTunes. The app as you know it — regular ol’ iTunes — is being replaced by three apps, including Apple Music, Apple TV and Podcasts.

If you have a ton of ripped music, playlists and a highly organized library, you might have worried about some headlines proclaiming that iTunes is dead.

It is, kind of, but you don’t need to worry about your music. Let me explain what’s going on.

iTunes was first launched in 2001. While it was once useful, it’s turned into a sort of catch-all for media content. That’s why Apple’s finally splitting it into separate apps on the Mac, like it does on iPhones and iPads.

Note that the change only affects Mac users, according to media reports. Windows users will still use iTunes.

After the switch, Apple says, all your music will automatically show up in the Music app. That includes all of your playlists, ripped albums and purchased content. But movies and TV shows you purchased over the years will now live in a separate app called Apple TV. Podcasts will live in a separate podcasts app.

Audio books will continue to be available through the Apple Books app, instead of in iTunes.

Some people use iTunes instead of iCloud to sync their iPhones and Macs. That function will move to the Mac Finder.

While iTunes the app will be dead on the Mac, the store will live on. You’ll still be able to use any iTunes gift cards you may have sitting around to buy new music or apps or movies and TV shows. You’ll just need to open the iTunes Store from the left-side panel inside the Music app, or open the equivalent stores in the TV or Podcasts app, to buy new content.

“The iTunes Store will remain the same as it is today on iOS, PC, and Apple TV. And, as always, you can access and download all of your purchases on any of your device,” Apple explains on its support page.

This isn’t to say the migration will be perfect — migrating to new versions of any software often has hiccups. We won’t know how smooth the experience is until it launches this fall.

But the point is: Even though iTunes is going away, your music and iTunes gift cards are not.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, apples, music, gift, app, tv, live, youll, itunes, mac, store, cards, separate, dying, dont, podcasts, worry


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