Space companies are racing to beam web access to the entire planet. But ‘space junk’ is a big worry

But there’s one big problem, experts say — the creation and threat from so-called “space junk.” The latest episode of CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast looks at London-based start-up OneWeb’s mission to launch satellites into space and the issues surrounding space junk and regulation. What is space junk? These human-made objects, which can be an entire satellite or even bits of rockets, are dubbed as space junk. Space junk has gotten worse for a number of reasons.


But there’s one big problem, experts say — the creation and threat from so-called “space junk.”
The latest episode of CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast looks at London-based start-up OneWeb’s mission to launch satellites into space and the issues surrounding space junk and regulation.
What is space junk?
These human-made objects, which can be an entire satellite or even bits of rockets, are dubbed as space junk.
Space junk has gotten worse for a number of reasons.
Space companies are racing to beam web access to the entire planet. But ‘space junk’ is a big worry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thousands, racing, big, earth, space, satellite, companies, junk, worry, beam, satellites, debris, entire, web, esa, spacex, planet


Space companies are racing to beam web access to the entire planet. But 'space junk' is a big worry

An computerized image showing a satellite orbiting the Earth. Jose Luis Stephens | EyeEm | Getty Images

Space companies, from Elon Musk’s SpaceX to start-up OneWeb, are racing to launch satellites into space with the aim of creating global internet coverage on Earth. But there’s one big problem, experts say — the creation and threat from so-called “space junk.” This debris floating in space could interfere with future space missions and satellite launches — and even send objects hurtling back to Earth. The latest episode of CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast looks at London-based start-up OneWeb’s mission to launch satellites into space and the issues surrounding space junk and regulation.

What is space junk?

There have been over 5,000 launches into space since the late 1950s, according to the European Space Agency (ESA) with nearly 9,000 satellites put up there. About 5,000 are still in space but under 2,000 are actually functioning. These human-made objects, which can be an entire satellite or even bits of rockets, are dubbed as space junk. The ESA said there are 22,300 pieces of debris that are traceable but there could be hundreds of thousands more than can’t be tracked. Space junk has gotten worse for a number of reasons. When rockets are launched, certain “stages” of rockets detach from the main body of the vessel. These explode, splintering into lots of pieces. That’s one cause of the growing amount of junk. One particular major event happened in 2009, when two satellites collided with each other, resulting in 2,300 trackable fragments being generated, the ESA said. The other big problem is countries launching anti-satellite missiles. For example, in 2007, China blew up one of its own missiles, increasing the amount of trackable debris size by 25% in that one incident. And in 2009, India carried out a similar missile launch on one of its own satellites. As space junk increases, there could be a snowball effect. If more debris is travelling at thousands of miles per hour in space and it hits another object, that can result in more splintering and more junk. “Imagine how dangerous sailing the high seas would be if all the ships ever lost in history were still drifting on top of the water,” ESA Director General Jan Worner said in a statement last year.

What’s the issue?

The biggest concern right now is the plans for thousands of satellites from various companies being launched into space. SpaceX and OneWeb are among the companies in this race. The aim is to create so-called mega-constellations that are able to provide internet access to anywhere in the world, even the remotest parts of Earth. Both SpaceX and OneWeb have already begun launching satellites. There are a number of risks associated with space junk. The first is that this debris could hit spacecraft carrying humans or even the International Space Station. Another risk is satellites hitting each other. And finally, the ESA warns that large space debris that “reenter into the atmosphere in an uncontrolled way can reach the ground and create risk to the population on ground.” “The space environment is a very delicate one,” Christopher Newman, professor of space law and policy at Northumbria University in the U.K., told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast. “And for many, many years there was the prevalence of what we call ‘big sky theory’ — space is big, we don’t need to worry about it. But actually the amount of operational space we are using is really quite small and especially now, with the constellations looking to occupy large areas of low Earth orbit, it’s becoming even more crowded.”

What is being done?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thousands, racing, big, earth, space, satellite, companies, junk, worry, beam, satellites, debris, entire, web, esa, spacex, planet


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Facebook’s copycat Pinterest app sent the stock falling, but history shows there’s nothing to worry about

Facebook’s latest “copycat” app sent shares of Pinterest falling 4% after hours on Thursday, but history shows investors may not have too much to worry about. While Facebook’s Stories feature infamously drew from a popular feature in Snap’s flagship Snapchat app, the company has historically had less success when it comes to cloning full, standalone apps. With the FTC already probing Facebook for potentially anticompetitive conduct, Facebook could try to lay low with new acquisitions and instead


Facebook’s latest “copycat” app sent shares of Pinterest falling 4% after hours on Thursday, but history shows investors may not have too much to worry about.
While Facebook’s Stories feature infamously drew from a popular feature in Snap’s flagship Snapchat app, the company has historically had less success when it comes to cloning full, standalone apps.
With the FTC already probing Facebook for potentially anticompetitive conduct, Facebook could try to lay low with new acquisitions and instead
Facebook’s copycat Pinterest app sent the stock falling, but history shows there’s nothing to worry about Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, try, review, stock, feature, pinterest, apps, history, sent, theres, falling, copycat, facebooks, team, npe, facebook, study, past, shows, worry


Facebook's copycat Pinterest app sent the stock falling, but history shows there's nothing to worry about

Facebook’s latest “copycat” app sent shares of Pinterest falling 4% after hours on Thursday, but history shows investors may not have too much to worry about.

While Facebook’s Stories feature infamously drew from a popular feature in Snap’s flagship Snapchat app, the company has historically had less success when it comes to cloning full, standalone apps.

On top of that, this week, the Federal Trade Commission announced it is launching a research study to review past small acquisitions by Facebook and its peers that did not require prior review by antitrust regulators. While the study is not an enforcement matter, Chairman Joe Simons emphasized the agency could take enforcement action if they stumble across an issue in their review. With the FTC already probing Facebook for potentially anticompetitive conduct, Facebook could try to lay low with new acquisitions and instead try to build its own products in-house.

Facebook has created a developer group known as the NPE Team to focus on new consumer-focused apps. Facebook said in a blog post it wanted to launch the apps under a separate brand name, which stands for New Product Experimentation, “to help set the appropriate expectations with users that NPE Team apps will change very rapidly and will be shut down if we learn that they’re not useful to people.”

Facebook declined to comment.

Here’s a look at some of the past “copycat” apps Facebook has launched:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, try, review, stock, feature, pinterest, apps, history, sent, theres, falling, copycat, facebooks, team, npe, facebook, study, past, shows, worry


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Three things every new investor needs to know

Three things every new investor needs to knowJosh Brown, CEO of Ritholtz Wealth Management, says new investors need to worry less about which stock to buy and more about why they want to invest. Understanding why you want to invest can help you determine a level of risk that you are comfortable maintaining. Watch this video to learn the other tips Josh Brown says new investors need to know.


Three things every new investor needs to knowJosh Brown, CEO of Ritholtz Wealth Management, says new investors need to worry less about which stock to buy and more about why they want to invest.
Understanding why you want to invest can help you determine a level of risk that you are comfortable maintaining.
Watch this video to learn the other tips Josh Brown says new investors need to know.
Three things every new investor needs to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, investors, brown, know, things, video, invest, tips, worry, understanding, investor, wealth, need, needs


Three things every new investor needs to know

Three things every new investor needs to know

Josh Brown, CEO of Ritholtz Wealth Management, says new investors need to worry less about which stock to buy and more about why they want to invest. Understanding why you want to invest can help you determine a level of risk that you are comfortable maintaining. Watch this video to learn the other tips Josh Brown says new investors need to know.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-12
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, watch, investors, brown, know, things, video, invest, tips, worry, understanding, investor, wealth, need, needs


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Scientists worry coronavirus could evolve into something worse than flu, says quarantined expert

The seasonal flu has killed more people than the coronavirus, but that is not why the outbreak is so concerning, infectious disease expert Ian Lipkin told CNBC on Monday. “We don’t know much about its transmissibility. The respiratory disease is capable of spreading through human-to-human contact, world health officials say. Health officials estimate about 20% of patients become severely sick, leading to pneumonia and respiratory failure. Asked whether he thought the Chinese government was being


The seasonal flu has killed more people than the coronavirus, but that is not why the outbreak is so concerning, infectious disease expert Ian Lipkin told CNBC on Monday.
“We don’t know much about its transmissibility.
The respiratory disease is capable of spreading through human-to-human contact, world health officials say.
Health officials estimate about 20% of patients become severely sick, leading to pneumonia and respiratory failure.
Asked whether he thought the Chinese government was being
Scientists worry coronavirus could evolve into something worse than flu, says quarantined expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-10  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disease, evolve, china, dont, health, scientists, outbreak, officials, know, flu, worse, worry, coronavirus, spread, lipkin, quarantined, expert


Scientists worry coronavirus could evolve into something worse than flu, says quarantined expert

The seasonal flu has killed more people than the coronavirus, but that is not why the outbreak is so concerning, infectious disease expert Ian Lipkin told CNBC on Monday.

“It’s a new virus. We don’t know much about it, and therefore we’re all concerned to make certain it doesn’t evolve into something even worse,” said Lipkin, speaking from his New York home on a 14-day self-quarantine after traveling to China to work on the outbreak.

Lipkin, the director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, was in Guangzhou and Beijing, where he advised local health officials. He said he did not travel to the city where the coronavirus emerged, Wuhan in central China, because it would have been more difficult to return to the U.S.

Lipkin, who worked on the 2003 SARS outbreak, said it is true that seasonal flu presents its own kind of problem, noting that globally up to 650,000 people die from it each year.

So far, more than 900 people who had the coronavirus have died.

The coronavirus is “not nearly as challenging for us as influenza” when seen strictly by the number of deaths, Lipkin said.

But that is not the only lens through which the outbreak should be viewed, he cautioned.

“We don’t know much about its transmissibility. We don’t necessarily have accurate diagnostic tests. And we don’t really know where the outbreak is going to go,” Lipkin said on CNBC’s “The Exchange.”

“The only thing we have at present, absent vaccines or drugs, is containment,” he added.

The coronavirus emerged in Wuhan about a month ago and has since spread from about 300 people as of Jan. 21 to more than 40,000. New cases grow by the thousands each day, the vast majority of which are in China.

Coronaviruses typically infect animals, but strains can sometimes evolve and spread to humans. Symptoms in humans can include fever, sore throat and shortness of breath.

The respiratory disease is capable of spreading through human-to-human contact, world health officials say.

The illness also is able to spread before symptoms materialize. Health officials estimate about 20% of patients become severely sick, leading to pneumonia and respiratory failure.

Lipkin said he estimates the mortality rate of the coronavirus will ultimately be less than 1%.

But the figure is “speculative” because more antibody tests need to be conducted “so we can figure out who might have been infected but not manifested signs of disease,” he said.

Asked whether he thought the Chinese government was being transparent about the disease, Lipkin said he thought it was doing an adequate job of disseminating the information it has.

“What may be taken as a lack of transparency may in fact be ignorance of what’s going on,” he said.

Lipkin said he plans to return to China within the next month, while some of his staff plan to go there next week.

“There’s an enormous amount to do,” he said. “And the suffering is impossible to explain.”

— CNBC’s Berkeley Lovelace Jr. contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-10  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disease, evolve, china, dont, health, scientists, outbreak, officials, know, flu, worse, worry, coronavirus, spread, lipkin, quarantined, expert


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I worry about what regulators might do to YouTube, analyst says

Analysts are concerned about the threat of regulation for YouTube, as Google broke out ad revenues for the video streaming site for the first time on Monday. YouTube ads made $15.15 billion in revenue for Google, and parent company Alphabet, during the 2019 financial year, though the company did not disclose profit. But Cyrus Mewawalla, head of thematic research at GlobalData, raised the threat of regulation for the internet giant. How strong will YouTube be in a market where Netflix and Disney


Analysts are concerned about the threat of regulation for YouTube, as Google broke out ad revenues for the video streaming site for the first time on Monday.
YouTube ads made $15.15 billion in revenue for Google, and parent company Alphabet, during the 2019 financial year, though the company did not disclose profit.
But Cyrus Mewawalla, head of thematic research at GlobalData, raised the threat of regulation for the internet giant.
How strong will YouTube be in a market where Netflix and Disney
I worry about what regulators might do to YouTube, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, regulators, threat, analyst, youtube, business, privacy, strong, regulation, risk, market, google


I worry about what regulators might do to YouTube, analyst says

Analysts are concerned about the threat of regulation for YouTube, as Google broke out ad revenues for the video streaming site for the first time on Monday.

YouTube ads made $15.15 billion in revenue for Google, and parent company Alphabet, during the 2019 financial year, though the company did not disclose profit. Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat said the majority of YouTube’s ad revenue goes to content creators.

But Cyrus Mewawalla, head of thematic research at GlobalData, raised the threat of regulation for the internet giant.

“YouTube’s model is an ad-funded model, they’re generating $15 billion from ads … that is a massive business and it’s successful without having too many paying subscribers … (but) I worry about what regulators might do to that business,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Tuesday.

In September, YouTube was fined $170 million to settle claims it violated child privacy laws. Google tracks what people do online and makes money from serving targeted ads based on their activity and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule (COPPA) requires sites that children visit to disclose data practices and get parental consent for collecting information on children under 13.

Google’s ad business is being investigated by 50 attorneys general over antitrust concerns, with lawmakers worried about the company’s dominance in the advertising market and the use of consumer data.

Mewawalla said Google’s core advertising business is “pretty strong” but added: “Everybody’s asking the question what comes next: Are they going to be strong in hardware, in cloud, in internet TV via YouTube, is regulation going to knock them down?”

He also noted the rise of video streaming competitors. “I think the core business is not under immediate threat. I think what’s under threat for investors, if you want to invest in this stock, is what comes next. How strong will YouTube be in a market where Netflix and Disney are at war and everybody’s coming into this market?” he stated. YouTube now has 20 million Premium subscribers, compared to Netflix, which has 167 million.

A note from Pivotal senior research analyst Michael Levine also noted the risk of regulation in the wake of Alphabet’s results. “Government regulation around data and privacy — required changes cause a much sharper than anticipated deceleration to ad growth,” was listed as a risk, according to an email to CNBC on Tuesday. Another risk is the prospect that anti-trust regulations might require Alphabet to “change business practice.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, regulators, threat, analyst, youtube, business, privacy, strong, regulation, risk, market, google


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The stock market is starting to worry about Bernie Sanders

Once panned by Wall Street as a socialist with “crazy” ideas, Sen. Bernie Sanders is finally commanding attention from investors. Molina Healthcare, an $8 billion health insurance company based in Long Beach, California, dropped 3.1%. Sanders election odds vs. health-care stocksThe red line is Sanders’ odds to win the Democratic nomination via PredictIt.org. His yearslong crusade against private health insurance and support for “Medicare for All” was a central pillar of his 2016 campaign as well


Once panned by Wall Street as a socialist with “crazy” ideas, Sen. Bernie Sanders is finally commanding attention from investors.
Molina Healthcare, an $8 billion health insurance company based in Long Beach, California, dropped 3.1%.
Sanders election odds vs. health-care stocksThe red line is Sanders’ odds to win the Democratic nomination via PredictIt.org.
His yearslong crusade against private health insurance and support for “Medicare for All” was a central pillar of his 2016 campaign as well
The stock market is starting to worry about Bernie Sanders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iowa, street, insurance, wall, support, market, stock, sanders, healthcare, health, democratic, odds, starting, worry, bernie


The stock market is starting to worry about Bernie Sanders

2020 Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on March 9, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa.

Once panned by Wall Street as a socialist with “crazy” ideas, Sen. Bernie Sanders is finally commanding attention from investors.

And they don’t like what they see.

Shares of the nation’s leading health insurance companies sank Monday after a handful of new polling data showed the Vermont Independent had eclipsed longtime front-runner Joe Biden among Iowans one week before the state’s key Democratic caucuses.

Stocks including Anthem, UnitedHealth and Cigna all fell at least 2% in early trading. Molina Healthcare, an $8 billion health insurance company based in Long Beach, California, dropped 3.1%.

“There was a battle between Sanders and Warren on who would be the progressive candidate. And Sanders appears to have won that battle,” said Thomas Block of Fundstrat Global Advisors. But “people I’ve talked to continue to not take Bernie that seriously.”

“A big win in Iowa could change that,” Block added.

An Iowa victory could trigger what Wall Street “Bond King” Jeffrey Gundlach labeled a Sanders “scare,” warning investors earlier this month that the biggest risk to the markets in 2020 is the Vermont senator becoming “more believed in as a real force” that investors would have to take more seriously.

“Bernie is stronger than people think,” the DoubleLine CEO said on Jan. 7. “I think it will be taken more seriously as the field winnows. The financial markets broadly will have to deal with the fact that there could be a scare that Bernie Sanders is starting to become a plausible candidate for the nomination.”

To anyone who’s opened a newspaper in the past 12 months, the fact that health-care stocks would fall whenever Sanders sees his support rise may not seem revolutionary. His avowed opposition to private-sector health care — and what he views as excessive profiteering in general — isn’t new.

Sanders election odds vs. health-care stocks

The red line is Sanders’ odds to win the Democratic nomination via PredictIt.org. The black line is the Health Care Select Sector SPDR ETF vs. the S&P 500 (relative performance of health-care stocks).

Source: Jefferies analyst Jared Holz

“If we are going to break the stranglehold of corporate interests over the health care needs of the American people, we have got to confront a Washington culture that has let this go on for far too long,” Sanders said in July. “That is why I am calling on every Democratic candidate in this election to join us in rejecting money from the insurance and drug industries.”

His yearslong crusade against private health insurance and support for “Medicare for All” was a central pillar of his 2016 campaign as well.

What has changed, however, is the way Wall Street is viewing his odds.

The results of a New York Times/Siena College poll released over the weekend showed his support among Iowa voters swelled by 6 points since their last survey in late October, putting Sanders well above rivals such as fellow progressive Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Biden.

Meanwhile, online betting market PredictIt shows Sanders’ odds of clinching the Democratic nomination at 40%, 6 percentage points above No. 2 Biden.

Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight puts Biden’s odds of winning the nomination at 2 in 5 (42%) and Sanders’ at 3 in 10 (28%). But even that represents a big bounce for Sanders, who earlier this month saw his odds on FiveThirtyEight at less than 20%.

Investors have for nearly two full election cycles dismissed the self-described democratic socialist as little more than a progressive to pull otherwise centrist Democrats further to the left. He was more an interesting thought experiment and testament to the consequences of income inequality than an actual threat for the White House.

The flurry of polling headlines appeared to be enough to convince traders that they should start to account for his chances, however remote.

That can explain two important developments: Why Sanders’ proposals to overhaul the American health-care system haven’t fazed Wall Street until now and why health-care stocks rallied during the last three months of 2019 as Warren’s support waned.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, iowa, street, insurance, wall, support, market, stock, sanders, healthcare, health, democratic, odds, starting, worry, bernie


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Jamie Dimon says his one big worry is negative interest rates

J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon told CNBC on Wednesday that negative interest rates are one of the only things that concern him in a market that’s otherwise in a “Goldilocks place.” “The only thing I have trepidation about is negative interest rates, QE, and the diversion between stock prices and bond prices and yield and stuff like that,” Dimon said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switerzland. Negative interest rates have been used by central banks in Japan and Europe


J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon told CNBC on Wednesday that negative interest rates are one of the only things that concern him in a market that’s otherwise in a “Goldilocks place.”
“The only thing I have trepidation about is negative interest rates, QE, and the diversion between stock prices and bond prices and yield and stuff like that,” Dimon said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switerzland.
Negative interest rates have been used by central banks in Japan and Europe
Jamie Dimon says his one big worry is negative interest rates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, negative, worry, dimon, big, central, used, trap, rates, growth, prices, interest, banks, jamie


Jamie Dimon says his one big worry is negative interest rates

J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon told CNBC on Wednesday that negative interest rates are one of the only things that concern him in a market that’s otherwise in a “Goldilocks place.”

“The only thing I have trepidation about is negative interest rates, QE, and the diversion between stock prices and bond prices and yield and stuff like that,” Dimon said on “Squawk Box” from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switerzland.

“It’s kind of one of the great experiments of all time, and we still don’t know what the ultimate outcome is,” Dimon said.

Negative interest rates have been used by central banks in Japan and Europe to try to stimulate their stubbornly stagnant economies. Economists are divided over their effectiveness to reignite economic growth, and some fear negative rates can keep growth subdued rather than lift it. They have been used in conjunction with quantitative easing, in the U.S. and abroad, where central banks purchase assets like Treasury bills.

“I think it’s very hard for central banks to forever make up for bad policy elsewhere,” Dimon said. “That puts in them in a trap. We’re a little bit in that trap today with rates so low around the world.”

“I would never buy a negative rate bond, not unless I was forced,” Dimon added. “In history whenever you’ve seen anything like that, it doesn’t necessarily end well.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-22  Authors: hugh son
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, negative, worry, dimon, big, central, used, trap, rates, growth, prices, interest, banks, jamie


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‘Our house is still on fire,’ Greta Thunberg tells Davos

Teen-age activist Greta Thunberg told world political and business leaders in Davo, Switzerland, on Tuesday that their inaction on the climate crisis was “fueling the flames by the hour.” The 17-year-old exhorted the World Economic Forum audience to “act as if you loved your children above all else.” And by panic, Thunberg said this did not mean relying on technologies that don’t yet, or may never, exist on scale, or by talking about reaching carbon neutrality by “cheating and fiddling” around w


Teen-age activist Greta Thunberg told world political and business leaders in Davo, Switzerland, on Tuesday that their inaction on the climate crisis was “fueling the flames by the hour.”
The 17-year-old exhorted the World Economic Forum audience to “act as if you loved your children above all else.”
And by panic, Thunberg said this did not mean relying on technologies that don’t yet, or may never, exist on scale, or by talking about reaching carbon neutrality by “cheating and fiddling” around w
‘Our house is still on fire,’ Greta Thunberg tells Davos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, carbon, greta, worry, davos, emissions, right, tells, house, world, thunberg, zero, political, panic


'Our house is still on fire,' Greta Thunberg tells Davos

Teen-age activist Greta Thunberg told world political and business leaders in Davo, Switzerland, on Tuesday that their inaction on the climate crisis was “fueling the flames by the hour.”

The 17-year-old exhorted the World Economic Forum audience to “act as if you loved your children above all else.”

Thunberg said she had been warned that telling people to panic, as she had done last year at the same event, was dangerous but quipped “don’t worry it’s fine I’ve done this before and I can assure you it doesn’t lead to anything.”

And by panic, Thunberg said this did not mean relying on technologies that don’t yet, or may never, exist on scale, or by talking about reaching carbon neutrality by “cheating and fiddling” around with numbers.

In fact, the climate activist said it was not a case of simply lowering carbon emissions or promising net zero but “real zero” emissions.

She said panic also did not mean offsetting emissions by just paying someone else to plant trees in other countries, like Africa.

Thunberg said if high emissions continued, the remaining carbon budget, something she spoke of during a panel earlier on Tuesday, would soon be “completely used up.”

And while Thunberg agreed people were right to feel “outrage and worry” at the news the U.S. was to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, she pointed out that the leaders of the other countries in the accord did not seem bothered that they were about to fail on their commitments.

But she stated that this problem was not about political parties on the right, left or center but that everyone across the spectrum had failed at tackling the environmental emergency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-21  Authors: vicky mckeever
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, carbon, greta, worry, davos, emissions, right, tells, house, world, thunberg, zero, political, panic


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Cramer’s week ahead: The Iran situation gives us ‘something new to worry about’

Cramer’s week ahead: The Iran situation gives us ‘something new to worry about’The economy is still strong, so investors should remain opportunistic, despite the headwinds of a U.S.-Iran conflict, “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer says.


Cramer’s week ahead: The Iran situation gives us ‘something new to worry about’The economy is still strong, so investors should remain opportunistic, despite the headwinds of a U.S.-Iran conflict, “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer says.
Cramer’s week ahead: The Iran situation gives us ‘something new to worry about’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, remain, strong, cramers, usiran, mad, week, opportunistic, situation, jim, iran, ahead, money, gives, worry


Cramer's week ahead: The Iran situation gives us 'something new to worry about'

Cramer’s week ahead: The Iran situation gives us ‘something new to worry about’

The economy is still strong, so investors should remain opportunistic, despite the headwinds of a U.S.-Iran conflict, “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, remain, strong, cramers, usiran, mad, week, opportunistic, situation, jim, iran, ahead, money, gives, worry


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Goldman has a big worry heading into 2020 that could cause market turmoil

Financial professionals sit in the Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The investment firm highlighted a decline in stock buybacks as a risk to the market in its weekly note to clients. Goldman estimates that buybacks will be down 15% to $710 billion this year and will decline another 5% in 2020. If share repurchases fall more than expected next year, it could lead to slower earnings per share growth and increased volatility. The question about buybacks from clients


Financial professionals sit in the Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
The investment firm highlighted a decline in stock buybacks as a risk to the market in its weekly note to clients.
Goldman estimates that buybacks will be down 15% to $710 billion this year and will decline another 5% in 2020.
If share repurchases fall more than expected next year, it could lead to slower earnings per share growth and increased volatility.
The question about buybacks from clients
Goldman has a big worry heading into 2020 that could cause market turmoil Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16  Authors: jesse pound, evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, repurchases, earnings, growth, goldman, cause, buybacks, market, heading, according, share, turmoil, big, volatility, note, 2020, decline


Goldman has a big worry heading into 2020 that could cause market turmoil

Financial professionals sit in the Goldman Sachs booth on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Goldman Sachs is bullish on equities next year, predicting a 7% gain for the S&P 500, but one topic is raising questions among its investors and has the bank concerned about volatility and downside risk.

The investment firm highlighted a decline in stock buybacks as a risk to the market in its weekly note to clients. Goldman estimates that buybacks will be down 15% to $710 billion this year and will decline another 5% in 2020.

If share repurchases fall more than expected next year, it could lead to slower earnings per share growth and increased volatility. The demand created by buybacks has outpaced demand from other sources, such as mutual funds, since 2011, giving repurchases increased importance in the U.S. markets, according to Goldman.

“A significant decline in buybacks would dramatically shift the supply-demand structure for US equities,” the note said.

The note points to how stocks perform during blackout periods, when buybacks are prohibited, to show what could happen with fewer repurchases. Stocks see larger negative returns and greater realized volatility during these blackout periods.

Earnings per share growth has outpaced earnings growth by an average of 2.6% over the past 15 years for the median S&P 500 company, according to Goldman, a gap that may close if buybacks decrease. Buybacks reduce the share price count, thus boosting earnings per share.

Goldman also addressed other questions from its investors in the note, including defending its above-consensus estimate of U.S. GDP growth in part by pointing to the phase one trade deal between the US and China. The firm also explained why it is more confident in industrials than financials, highlighting strength among aerospace and defense companies.

The question about buybacks from clients got the longest and most concerning response, according to the note.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16  Authors: jesse pound, evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worry, repurchases, earnings, growth, goldman, cause, buybacks, market, heading, according, share, turmoil, big, volatility, note, 2020, decline


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