Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them

Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California.


Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California.
Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, billionaire, accomplish, virgin, actually, branson, richard, talking, plans, goals, idea, hollywood, come, ahead, talks


Why billionaire Richard Branson talks about his goals before he has any idea how to accomplish them

Richard Branson, poses for photographers with a model of the LauncherOne rocket, from the window of Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo.

Richard Branson is used to shooting for the stars. Last week, Virgin Galactic announced its plans to become the first publicly-traded space tourism company. It’s a bold feat, and one that Branson credits to dreaming big – and out loud. “One of my most enduring (and hopefully endearing!) habits is talking about plans that are yet to come to fruition,” Branson writes in a recent blog post. “Whenever I come up with an exciting new idea or hear a thrilling new proposal, I want to tell the world about it straight away.” He calls this habit “talking ahead of yourself.” “Far from being a problem, talking ahead of yourself can actually be very useful,” he writes. “By setting yourself future goals that many people deem unrealistic, you actually bring them closer to reality.”

Sir Richard Branson is honored with star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on October 16, 2018 in Hollywood, California. Axelle/Bauer-Griffin | FilmMagic | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: elizabeth gravier
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, billionaire, accomplish, virgin, actually, branson, richard, talking, plans, goals, idea, hollywood, come, ahead, talks


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This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


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US Soccer star Carli Lloyd was told she wasn’t good enough at 21 and was going to quit the sport

At the 2019 Women’s World Cup, U.S. soccer legend Carli Lloyd has already notched two goals — and she’ll be looking for more on Friday, when her team faces tournament host France in the quarterfinal match. But Lloyd, 36, who’s a two-time Olympic gold medalist and competing in her fourth World Cup, hasn’t always been in the spotlight. In fact, she thought her soccer career would be over after graduating from college. “In my head, I was going to finish my last year at Rutgers and then get a real j


At the 2019 Women’s World Cup, U.S. soccer legend Carli Lloyd has already notched two goals — and she’ll be looking for more on Friday, when her team faces tournament host France in the quarterfinal match. But Lloyd, 36, who’s a two-time Olympic gold medalist and competing in her fourth World Cup, hasn’t always been in the spotlight. In fact, she thought her soccer career would be over after graduating from college. “In my head, I was going to finish my last year at Rutgers and then get a real j
US Soccer star Carli Lloyd was told she wasn’t good enough at 21 and was going to quit the sport Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lloyd, work, going, carli, star, wasnt, world, team, womens, sport, told, good, cup, whos, soccer, quit, writes


US Soccer star Carli Lloyd was told she wasn't good enough at 21 and was going to quit the sport

At the 2019 Women’s World Cup, U.S. soccer legend Carli Lloyd has already notched two goals — and she’ll be looking for more on Friday, when her team faces tournament host France in the quarterfinal match.

But Lloyd, 36, who’s a two-time Olympic gold medalist and competing in her fourth World Cup, hasn’t always been in the spotlight.

In fact, she thought her soccer career would be over after graduating from college. “In my head, I was going to finish my last year at Rutgers and then get a real job,” Lloyd writes on The Players’ Tribune, adding: “I was going to be an FBI agent. That was my plan.”

She was 21 and had just been cut from the under-21 U.S. national team. “You don’t work hard enough,” the coach told her. “You aren’t fit and I simply can’t put you on the roster.” That’s when Lloyd was convinced that she was “totally done with soccer,” she writes. “Done done. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lloyd, work, going, carli, star, wasnt, world, team, womens, sport, told, good, cup, whos, soccer, quit, writes


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Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450

In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it. In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest. “


In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it. In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest. “
Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, candidate, 450, middleclass, mayor, south, monthly, mortgage, payment, actually, writes, midwestern, city, pete, lifestyle, presidential, buttigieg


Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg says his monthly mortgage payment is $450

In just a few short months, 37-year-old presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has gone from being the little-known mayor of Indiana ‘s fourth largest city, South Bend, to a household name — regardless of whether you can pronounce it.

In his time on the campaign trail Buttigieg (pronounced “boot-edge-edge”) — or as his constituents call him, “Mayor Pete” — has emphasized his Midwestern roots.

“Everybody’s talking about the middle of the country like it’s some mysterious place and I think it might make sense to have somebody in the mix who actually lives here,” Buttigieg told CNBC Make It in a previous interview. “I actually live in a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in the American Midwest.”

One aspect of that Midwestern lifestyle? Affordable housing. “[His] home is one of the nicest in the city and serves as a reminder of South Bend’s distance from the coasts: The mortgage payment, according to Buttigieg, is about $450 a month,” writes Nathan Heller in Vogue.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, candidate, 450, middleclass, mayor, south, monthly, mortgage, payment, actually, writes, midwestern, city, pete, lifestyle, presidential, buttigieg


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Amazon’s Jeff Bezos: Why success depends on not being efficient sometimes

“Sometimes (often actually) in business, you do know where you’re going, and when you do, you can be efficient. Put in place a plan and execute,” Bezos writes. They like to invent,” Bezos writes. They know the path to success is anything but straight,” Bezos writes. I guarantee you they’d have looked at you strangely and said ‘No, thank you,” Bezos writes.


“Sometimes (often actually) in business, you do know where you’re going, and when you do, you can be efficient. Put in place a plan and execute,” Bezos writes. They like to invent,” Bezos writes. They know the path to success is anything but straight,” Bezos writes. I guarantee you they’d have looked at you strangely and said ‘No, thank you,” Bezos writes.
Amazon’s Jeff Bezos: Why success depends on not being efficient sometimes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: catherine clifford, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wandering, big, jeff, successful, writes, bezos, amazon, business, efficient, depends, know, things, amazons, success, way


Amazon's Jeff Bezos: Why success depends on not being efficient sometimes

Amazon is a business about efficiency: You can order almost anything you want and it will arrive on your doorstep extremely quickly.

Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos says it’s built into the company’s DNA: “At Amazon, I know what the big ideas are: low prices, fast delivery and vast, huge selection,” he said in September.

But for employees at Amazon, there is actually a time to be inefficient too, Bezos said in his annual letter to shareholders, published Thursday.

Bezos calls it “wandering.”

“Sometimes (often actually) in business, you do know where you’re going, and when you do, you can be efficient. Put in place a plan and execute,” Bezos writes. “In contrast, wandering in business is not efficient … but … the prize for customers is big enough that it’s worth being a little messy and tangential to find our way there,” he writes.

Wandering is guided, says Bezos, “by hunch, gut, intuition, curiosity,” and it is “an essential counter-balance to efficiency,” he says.

“You need to employ both. The outsized discoveries – the ‘non-linear’ ones – are highly likely to require wandering.”

Bezos wants to give Amazon’s 647,500 full- and part-time employees (as of December) room to do more than execute.

“From very early on in Amazon’s life, we knew we wanted to create a culture of builders – people who are curious, explorers. They like to invent,” Bezos writes. “Even when they’re experts, they are ‘fresh’ with a beginner’s mind. They see the way we do things as just the way we do things now.”

In addition to time for wandering, that also means there needs to be room to fail.

“A builder’s mentality helps us approach big, hard-to-solve opportunities with a humble conviction that success can come through iteration: invent, launch, reinvent, relaunch, start over, rinse, repeat, again and again. They know the path to success is anything but straight,” Bezos writes.

Sometimes that even means having “multibillion-dollar failures,” he says.

The calculus behind having the confidence to wander and fail is knowing that when an idea works, it can work big.

For example, “No customer was asking for Echo. This was definitely us wandering,” says Bezos.

“Market research doesn’t help. If you had gone to a customer in 2013 and said ‘Would you like a black, always-on cylinder in your kitchen about the size of a Pringles can that you can talk to and ask questions, that also turns on your lights and plays music?’ I guarantee you they’d have looked at you strangely and said ‘No, thank you,” Bezos writes.

Since being released, however, the Echo has been wildly successful. Customers have bought more than 100 million devices to run Alexa.

“The good news for shareowners is that a single big winning bet can more than cover the cost of many losers,” says Bezos.

See also:

Elon Musk calls Jeff Bezos a ‘copycat’ on Twitter, for launching satellites

Jeff Bezos: Forget Mars, humans will live in these free-floating space pod colonies

4 keys to launching a successful business, according to this entrepreneur who sold Siri to Steve Jobs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: catherine clifford, alex wong, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wandering, big, jeff, successful, writes, bezos, amazon, business, efficient, depends, know, things, amazons, success, way


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The habit Alex Rodriguez prioritizes every night is one that Richard Branson also swears by—here’s why

Alex Rodriguez finishes every day with the same habit: He writes out a checklist of “to-do” items or records general thoughts and ideas in a notebook. “I’m old school,” the former MLB star tells The New York Times Magazine in a recent interview about his doping suspension and rebuilding his image. For example, “The other day, Jennifer said something brilliant at, like, two in the morning,” says Rodriguez, who is newly engaged to singer Jennifer Lopez. “I reached over to get my notebook, and ever


Alex Rodriguez finishes every day with the same habit: He writes out a checklist of “to-do” items or records general thoughts and ideas in a notebook. “I’m old school,” the former MLB star tells The New York Times Magazine in a recent interview about his doping suspension and rebuilding his image. For example, “The other day, Jennifer said something brilliant at, like, two in the morning,” says Rodriguez, who is newly engaged to singer Jennifer Lopez. “I reached over to get my notebook, and ever
The habit Alex Rodriguez prioritizes every night is one that Richard Branson also swears by—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: kathleen elkins, jim mcisaac, getty images, -richard branson, billionaire entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, byheres, jennifer, day, wrote, prioritizes, things, richard, night, magazine, tells, branson, alex, york, rodriguez, habit, swears


The habit Alex Rodriguez prioritizes every night is one that Richard Branson also swears by—here's why

Alex Rodriguez finishes every day with the same habit: He writes out a checklist of “to-do” items or records general thoughts and ideas in a notebook.

“I’m old school,” the former MLB star tells The New York Times Magazine in a recent interview about his doping suspension and rebuilding his image. “I remember things better if I write them out.”

For example, “The other day, Jennifer said something brilliant at, like, two in the morning,” says Rodriguez, who is newly engaged to singer Jennifer Lopez. “I reached over to get my notebook, and everything falls on the floor. Then I grabbed it and wrote it down.”

It’s not a new habit. As a professional baseball player, “I had a list of my 10 things I had to do, and I would check it every night before I went to bed to see how many I’d done,” he tells The NYT Magazine. “I was maniacal about my work ethic.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: kathleen elkins, jim mcisaac, getty images, -richard branson, billionaire entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, byheres, jennifer, day, wrote, prioritizes, things, richard, night, magazine, tells, branson, alex, york, rodriguez, habit, swears


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Oprah Winfrey: This is the moment my ‘job ended’ and my ‘calling began’

Oprah Winfrey is worth $2.5 billion and has seen much success: She leveraged “The Oprah Winfrey Show” into a booming media and entertainment empire, she has written best-selling books and now she’s even creating original content for Apple. Winfrey writes that she felt she was misplaced and never truly felt comfortable with her seat on the 6 p.m. news. Her job as a talk show co-host, Winfrey recalls, felt different than her job as a news reporter. “That day, my ‘job’ ended and my calling began.”


Oprah Winfrey is worth $2.5 billion and has seen much success: She leveraged “The Oprah Winfrey Show” into a booming media and entertainment empire, she has written best-selling books and now she’s even creating original content for Apple. Winfrey writes that she felt she was misplaced and never truly felt comfortable with her seat on the 6 p.m. news. Her job as a talk show co-host, Winfrey recalls, felt different than her job as a news reporter. “That day, my ‘job’ ended and my calling began.”
Oprah Winfrey: This is the moment my ‘job ended’ and my ‘calling began’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: sarah berger, michael kovac
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winfrey, oprah, felt, moment, ended, job, calling, began, life, talk, reporter, seeds, writes


Oprah Winfrey: This is the moment my 'job ended' and my 'calling began'

Oprah Winfrey is worth $2.5 billion and has seen much success: She leveraged “The Oprah Winfrey Show” into a booming media and entertainment empire, she has written best-selling books and now she’s even creating original content for Apple.

But when she was first starting out, Winfrey toiled away at a job she disliked and even got demoted. In Winfrey’s new book “The Path Made Clear: Discovering Your Life’s Direction and Purpose,” she shares a defining moment in her early career that helped shape the rest of her life.

In the late ’70s, Winfrey had been working as a news anchor and reporter at Baltimore’s WJZ station. But at that job, she never felt like her authentic self.

“And my bosses certainly made no secret of their feelings,” Winfrey writes. “They told me I was the wrong color, the wrong size, and that I showed too much emotion.”

Winfrey writes that she felt she was misplaced and never truly felt comfortable with her seat on the 6 p.m. news.

“It wasn’t until I was unceremoniously ‘demoted’ to cohost of ‘People are Talking’ that I experienced the first spark of what it means to become fully alive,” Winfrey writes.

Winfrey’s defining moment happened on Aug. 14, 1978, her first day working on WJZ talk show “People are Talking.”

Her job as a talk show co-host, Winfrey recalls, felt different than her job as a news reporter. As a reporter, she remembers feeling exhausted and having to drag herself to work. The talk show, however, sparked something within her. During that first show, she interviewed Tom Carvel (the inventor of soft serve ice cream) and remembers feeling “lit up” from the inside.

“When the hour ended, there was a sense of knowing resonating within my heart and radiating to the hairs on the back of my neck,” Winfrey writes. “My entire body told me this is what I was supposed to do.”

“There was no doubt that the seeds of what was to give my life meaning and purpose had been planted,” Winfrey writes. “That day, my ‘job’ ended and my calling began.”

Winfrey shares the story in “The Seeds,” the first chapter of her new book. The book is meant to be a guide to creating a life of significance, with each chapter (like “The Whispers” and “The Road”) representing a milestone “along the road to self-discovery.”

Winfrey says there were other times in her life she felt something new being seeded. For example, years later, at the peak of her success with “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” she felt there was something else out there. So Winfrey ended her show in 2011 and went on to build up OWN, her cable network, among other ventures.

“This is the lesson I hope you take away,” Winfrey writes. “Your life is not static. Every decision, every setback, or triumph is an opportunity to identify the seeds of truth that make you the wondrous human being that you are.

“I’m not talking just about what you do for a living,” she adds. “When you pay attention to what feeds your energy, you move in the direction of the life for which you were intended. Trust that the Universe has a bigger, wider, deeper dream for you than you could ever imagine for yourself.”

Don’t miss: Michael Phelps once did 75 workouts in 24 days — here’s where his drive comes from

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-01  Authors: sarah berger, michael kovac
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winfrey, oprah, felt, moment, ended, job, calling, began, life, talk, reporter, seeds, writes


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American mothers have it the worst, and it’s not their fault—here’s why

It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries. In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in


It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries. In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in
American mothers have it the worst, and it’s not their fault—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: amy morin, crience
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, american, work, demands, support, mothers, germany, faultheres, women, collins, working, placed, writes


American mothers have it the worst, and it's not their fault—here's why

It should come as no surprise to hear that American mothers are drowning in stress the most — at least when compared to other countries.

In her new book, “Making Motherhood Work,” sociologist Caitlyn Collins explains why mothers in the U.S. have it the worst. The majority of them experience crushing guilt about not being good enough in their careers and not being available for their families around the clock.

But none of that is their fault, Collins argues, because they have more demands placed on them and fewer support systems to help them. In her research, Collins interviews 135 middle-class working mothers in the U.S., Germany, Sweden and Italy. “The United States is an outlier among Western Industrialized countries for its lack of support for working mothers,” she writes in her book.

In Berlin, for example, mothers feel well-supported by the culture set in place. Policies there allow many to work part-time or telecommute after taking a full year of parental leave. “Germany has 83 million people, and they figured out. There are a lot of smart people here and [the U.S.] can figure it out,” she said in an interview with Psychology Today.

Women’s magazines and TV shows are filled with productivity tips — suggesting that women are overwhelmed because they don’t know how to be efficient. But the truth is, women have too many demands placed on them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: amy morin, crience
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, american, work, demands, support, mothers, germany, faultheres, women, collins, working, placed, writes


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Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes ‘lie to get what you want’

Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Within less


Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Within less
Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes ‘lie to get what you want’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: dustin mckissen, -simon sinek
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simon, chicken, server, vegetarian, michael, soup, really, sinek, successful, lie, vegetable, stock, writes


Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes 'lie to get what you want'

We’ve all been raised to believe that lying is wrong…right?

Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying.

“[Michael] loves going out for dinner with his friends and never complains. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. “When we went out for dinner recently, I witnessed a little trick he uses to ensure he stays a vegetarian when he’s not doing the cooking himself.”

After Michael decided to order soup, he asked the server whether it was vegetable or chicken stock. She assured him that it was vegetable.

When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Because I’m really allergic to chicken and if there’s any chicken in it I will have a seizure,” Michael persists.

The server, now uncertain, said she would check again with someone else in the kitchen.

“Within less than a minute,” according to Sinek, “she walked back and took the bowl of soup away from Michael.”

Turns out, the soup was made with chicken stock.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: dustin mckissen, -simon sinek
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simon, chicken, server, vegetarian, michael, soup, really, sinek, successful, lie, vegetable, stock, writes


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Bill Gates: These breakthrough technologies are going to profoundly change the world

Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates says these are among the technologies that are going to change the world we live in. Gates curated the 18th edition of the MIT Technology Review’s annual roundup of “recent technology breakthroughs that are poised to deeply impact our lives” released Wednesday, according to an MIT press release. For much of human history, innovation has been focused on improving survival rates and longevity, Gates writes in an introduction to the list. But “because


Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates says these are among the technologies that are going to change the world we live in. Gates curated the 18th edition of the MIT Technology Review’s annual roundup of “recent technology breakthroughs that are poised to deeply impact our lives” released Wednesday, according to an MIT press release. For much of human history, innovation has been focused on improving survival rates and longevity, Gates writes in an introduction to the list. But “because
Bill Gates: These breakthrough technologies are going to profoundly change the world Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, aurelien meunier, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bill, breakthrough, profoundly, weve, gates, wearable, writes, history, lives, wellbeing, change, mit, technologies, technology, going, world


Bill Gates: These breakthrough technologies are going to profoundly change the world

Personalized cancer vaccines. Lab-grown meat. Toilets that save lives. Wearable electrocardiograms.

Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates says these are among the technologies that are going to change the world we live in.

Gates curated the 18th edition of the MIT Technology Review’s annual roundup of “recent technology breakthroughs that are poised to deeply impact our lives” released Wednesday, according to an MIT press release.

For much of human history, innovation has been focused on improving survival rates and longevity, Gates writes in an introduction to the list. But “because we’re living longer, our focus is starting to shift toward well-being,” Gates writes. “We’ve reached a point where we’re tackling both ideas at once, and that’s what makes this moment in history so interesting.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: catherine clifford, aurelien meunier, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, bill, breakthrough, profoundly, weve, gates, wearable, writes, history, lives, wellbeing, change, mit, technologies, technology, going, world


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