10 principles for great leadership, according to Disney’s CEO

It’s ruinous to morale,” Iger writes. Time and energy and capital get wasted,” Iger writes. Chronic indecision is not only inefficient and counterproductive but deeply corrosive to morale,” writes Iger. “This doesn’t mean that you lower your expectations or convey the message that mistakes don’t matter. You have to be prepared,” Iger writes.


It’s ruinous to morale,” Iger writes.
Time and energy and capital get wasted,” Iger writes.
Chronic indecision is not only inefficient and counterproductive but deeply corrosive to morale,” writes Iger.
“This doesn’t mean that you lower your expectations or convey the message that mistakes don’t matter.
You have to be prepared,” Iger writes.
10 principles for great leadership, according to Disney’s CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, disney, according, iger, curiosity, disneys, writes, ceo, matter, ive, important, leadership, dont, business, great, principles


10 principles for great leadership, according to Disney's CEO

He now makes $66 million a year as the CEO of Disney, but Bob Iger’s rise to the top wasn’t exactly easy. The Long Island native had to work odd jobs starting at the age of 13 to help support himself. As a teenager, he worked as a summer janitor in his school district, scraping gum from under desks. He got his first position at ABC Television as a studio supervisor at 23 and spent the next 31 years moving through more than 20 different positions at the network. He was named CEO of The Walt Disney Company in 2005. “I’ve been the lowliest crew member working on a daytime soap opera and run a network that produced some of the most innovative television (and one of the infamous flops) of all time. I’ve twice been on the side of the company being taken over, and I’ve acquired and assimilated several others, among them Pixar, Marvel, Lucas-film, and, most recently, 21st Century Fox,” Iger writes in his memoir, “The Ride of a Lifetime.” And while he credits his father for encouraging him to work hard and stay productive, Iger has also learned a thing or two about what it takes to rise to the top — and stay there. Iger outlines in his book a set of 10 principles, which he says helped him succeed and are essential for every good leader.

1. Optimism

Iger writes that being and staying positive is one of the most important qualities a leader can have. “If you walk up and down the hall constantly telling people ‘The sky is falling,’ a sense of doom and gloom will, over time, permeate the company. You can’t communicate pessimism to the people around you. It’s ruinous to morale,” Iger writes. He says the bottom line is that “no one” wants to follow a pessimist. Optimism is about believing in yourself and your employees’ abilities.

2. Courage

The foundation of risk-taking in business is courage, Iger says. “Too often, we lead from a place of fear rather than courage, stubbornly trying to build a bulwark to protect old models that can’t possibly survive the sea change that is underway,” he writes. “Don’t be in the business of playing it safe. Be in the business of creating possibilities for greatness.”

3. Focus

Iger says it’s extremely important to allocate your time, energy and resources to the issues and goals that are the most important at that moment. And it’s imperative to convey your priorities clearly and repeatedly to your team. “If you don’t articulate your priorities clearly, then the people around you don’t know what their own should be. Time and energy and capital get wasted,” Iger writes. Additionally, Iger cautions against letting your ambition get ahead of current opportunities and responsibilities. “By fixating on a future job or project, you become impatient with where you are. You don’t tend enough to the responsibilities you do have, and so ambition can become counterproductive.”

4. Decisiveness

“All decisions, no matter how difficult, can and should be made in a timely way. Chronic indecision is not only inefficient and counterproductive but deeply corrosive to morale,” writes Iger.

5. Curiosity

Iger says having a “deep and abiding” curiosity enables the discovery of new people, places and ideas (i.e., business ventures). Curiosity also helps leaders gain awareness and an understanding of the marketplace and its changing dynamics. “The path to innovation begins with curiosity,” he says.

6. Fairness

Be decent to people always, Iger says. Every leader must treat everyone with fairness and empathy. “This doesn’t mean that you lower your expectations or convey the message that mistakes don’t matter. It means that you create an environment where people know you’ll hear them out, that you’re emotionally consistent and fair-minded, and that they’ll be given second chances for honest mistakes.”

7. Thoughtfulness

Iger says thoughtfulness is one of the most underrated elements of good leadership. He says thoughtfulness is the process of gaining knowledge so that when you give an opinion or make a decision, you have enough knowledge to back it up. “You have to do the homework. You have to be prepared,” Iger writes. On the flip side, you have to recognize that there is never 100% certainty and no matter how much data you’ve been given, any decision is still, ultimately, “a risk.”

8. Authenticity

Iger says you should never “fake anything,” and it is essential to be genuine and honest at all times. He encourages leaders to take responsibility when they screw up and learn from their mistakes. “Set an example that it’s okay to get things wrong sometimes,” he says.

9. Relentless pursuit of perfectionism

According to Iger, Michael Eisner, the former CEO of Disney, once told him, “If you believe that something can be made better, put in the effort to do it,” and that “micromanaging is underrated.” Iger agrees — to a point. Sweating the details can show employees how much you care, says Iger, but on the downside, it can be stultifying and come across as a lack of trust in the people who work for you.

10. Integrity


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-23  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, disney, according, iger, curiosity, disneys, writes, ceo, matter, ive, important, leadership, dont, business, great, principles


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Ali Wong completely bombed while performing in front of her comedy idol—here’s why she says that was a good thing

But for on-stage performers like Ali Wong, failure can be a lot more public — and devastating. At the part-coffee shop, part-laundromat, “I would go up every single night at a different mic and try a million new jokes,” Wong writes. “It was Eddie Murphy. “I knew Eddie Murphy specifically wasn’t laughing, because everyone knows when Eddie Murphy is or isn’t laughing,” Wong continues. While that particular night was cringe-worthy for Wong, she says that type of failure is necessary to get better,


But for on-stage performers like Ali Wong, failure can be a lot more public — and devastating. At the part-coffee shop, part-laundromat, “I would go up every single night at a different mic and try a million new jokes,” Wong writes. “It was Eddie Murphy. “I knew Eddie Murphy specifically wasn’t laughing, because everyone knows when Eddie Murphy is or isn’t laughing,” Wong continues. While that particular night was cringe-worthy for Wong, she says that type of failure is necessary to get better,
Ali Wong completely bombed while performing in front of her comedy idol—here’s why she says that was a good thing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, performing, bombed, successful, standup, writes, ali, good, comedian, young, completely, comedy, idolheres, night, eddie, murphy, wong, thing


Ali Wong completely bombed while performing in front of her comedy idol—here's why she says that was a good thing

Successful people talk a big game when it comes to failure.

It can teach perseverance, spur creativity and shine a light on what people are truly passionate about.

But for on-stage performers like Ali Wong, failure can be a lot more public — and devastating. But the comedian says learning to like bombing, and doing it a lot, is one of the most important things in order to be successful in the business.

Her new book, “Dear Girls,” is a humorous and intimate letter to her two young daughters about growing up, getting married, starting a family and growing her career. In the memoir, Wong shares the successes and setbacks that have shaped her journey from stand-up comedian to TV actor to writer, producer and star of her own Netflix hit movie “Always Be My Maybe.”

But before she was making out with the likes of Keanu Reeves, Daniel Dae Kim and Randall Park (in the film, that is), she was weathering the ups and downs of open mic nights in San Francisco.

She shares in her book that one of the first places she performed was at the Brainwash Cafe on Folsom Street in San Francisco. At the part-coffee shop, part-laundromat, “I would go up every single night at a different mic and try a million new jokes,” Wong writes. “I mostly bombed. It’s the only way to get good.”

Years later, after she was introduced to the masses through her Netflix stand-up specials “Baby Cobra” and “Hard Knock Wife,” she got the chance to perform in front of the person who inspired her to get into comedy in the first place.

“Right when I got up on stage, I noticed a man with huge black sunglasses sitting to my right, with his hood on, holding hands with a beautiful young blond model,” she writes. “It was Eddie Murphy. My number one comedy idol.”

At the time, she was pregnant with her second daughter, Nikki, and was doing a last-minute pop-up show opening for Dave Chappelle. While she had intended to practice new material during the set, the star-struck comedian instead delivered 10 minutes of her best routine, but it was ultimately met with complete silence.

“I knew Eddie Murphy specifically wasn’t laughing, because everyone knows when Eddie Murphy is or isn’t laughing,” Wong continues. “You could recognize his signature ‘HANH-HANH-HANH’ goose honk anywhere. And that night, there were no geese.”

While that particular night was cringe-worthy for Wong, she says that type of failure is necessary to get better, especially in the comedy scene. Someone interested in performing needs room to experiment, to find their voice, to offer an interesting point of view, and most importantly, to suck.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: jennifer liu
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The off-season diet and workout plan that keeps one-handed NFL star Shaquem Griffin in shape

To prepare for a strong second-year performance in the league, Griffin tells The Wall Street Journal that he followed a strict diet and workout routine during his off-season. Shaquem Griffin is a Seattle Seahawks linebacker who, in 2018, made history as the first one-handed player to be drafted in the NFL. Linebacker Shaquem Griffin #49 and cornerback Shaquill Griffin #26 of the Seattle Seahawks head off the field following the game against the Minnesota Vikings at CenturyLink Field on December


To prepare for a strong second-year performance in the league, Griffin tells The Wall Street Journal that he followed a strict diet and workout routine during his off-season. Shaquem Griffin is a Seattle Seahawks linebacker who, in 2018, made history as the first one-handed player to be drafted in the NFL. Linebacker Shaquem Griffin #49 and cornerback Shaquill Griffin #26 of the Seattle Seahawks head off the field following the game against the Minnesota Vikings at CenturyLink Field on December
The off-season diet and workout plan that keeps one-handed NFL star Shaquem Griffin in shape Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diet, nfl, eat, shaquem, plan, dad, star, griffin, shape, onehanded, brother, days, shaquill, seattle, workout, offseason, keeps, writes


The off-season diet and workout plan that keeps one-handed NFL star Shaquem Griffin in shape

(He doesn’t wear the prosthetic when he plays in NFL games, but just for his workouts.)

Three of those days they spent focusing on the upper body, while the other two days were spent focusing on the lower body. On upper body days, the 24-year-old, who had his hand amputated at 4 years old due to a congenital birth defect, says he would wear a prosthetic to do exercises like pull-ups, rows and 225-pound bench presses.

He explains that he and his twin brother and teammate, Shaquill Griffin, worked out five days a week for 90 minutes to two hours, in their hometown of St. Petersburg, Florida.

To prepare for a strong second-year performance in the league, Griffin tells The Wall Street Journal that he followed a strict diet and workout routine during his off-season.

Shaquem Griffin is a Seattle Seahawks linebacker who, in 2018, made history as the first one-handed player to be drafted in the NFL.

Linebacker Shaquem Griffin #49 and cornerback Shaquill Griffin #26 of the Seattle Seahawks head off the field following the game against the Minnesota Vikings at CenturyLink Field on December 10, 2018 in Seattle, Washington.

Some days, he says, he and his brother would go to their father’s car towing shop to do tire flips, or to push cars. To recover from their workouts, he says they would get massages twice a week and visit a chiropractor every other week.

In addition to following a strict workout routine, Griffin says he and his brother also hired a chef to help them develop a healthier diet. For breakfast, they would have six egg whites, sweet potatoes, turkey bacon and sausage. After a workout, they would eat a protein bowl filled with brown rice, broccoli and chicken or steak. For lunch or dinner, he says they would eat fish or baked chicken with brown rice and roasted vegetables.

Each day, they would eat four or five smaller meals, rather than three big meals.

“I used to eat whatever I wanted, but I realized food is my fuel and affects my performance and recovery,” says Griffin, who admitted that cheesecake is still his “cheat day” item at times.

Though making adjustments to your diet and lifestyle can be difficult, the 24-year-old says having his brother as his workout partner made his process a lot easier. “When one of us gets tired, the other one motivates to get in another rep and push harder,” he says. “We keep each other competitive.”

In a 2018 essay published by The Players’ Tribune, Griffin explained how he and his brother’s support for each other dates back to when they were kids. And that wasn’t the only family support he received. He writes that growing up, his dad never treated him any differently from his siblings, and he never allowed any of them to make excuses for why they couldn’t do something.

He recalls the time when he, his brother Shaquill and their older brother brother Andre would play football in the backyard with their dad.

“We had a couple of stacks of cinder blocks with a stick across the top, like a hurdle,” he writes. “And when we would run routes, we would have to jump over the hurdle and do other obstacles mid-route. Then my dad would throw us the ball, and he’d throw it hard, right at our chest. And every time we dropped it, he would say, ‘Nothing comes easy.'”

Though Griffin admits that he “hated those workouts,” he writes that the three-word motto from his dad, “Nothing comes easy,” never allowed him to quit.

“There were definitely times when I wanted to quit,” he writes. “Sometimes, when my dad threw the ball so hard that it bounced off my chest or it hit me in the face, I would be like, ‘I don’t wanna do this anymore.'”

In response, he says, his dad would tell him, “You’ll thank me one day.”

“At the time, I didn’t believe him,” he writes. “Now, I understand, and I thank him every chance I get, because all that work in the backyard helped me to develop the mentality that I can handle anything — that whatever you come at me with, I can come back at you even harder.”

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Don’t miss: First one-handed player drafted into the NFL shares the motto that kept him from quitting


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-13  Authors: courtney connley
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Billionaire Ray Dalio: The 2 things you have to do to get ‘the money you need and the job you want’

But hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes the dream is achievable, so long as you can master two skills: creativity and flexibility. “To have both the money you need and the job you want, you have to be creative and flexible,” Dalio wrote in a LinkedIn post on Wednesday. “Start by thinking hard about if there’s anything that you’re passionate about that pays well,” Dalio writes. Dalio’s friend has a career as a commercial artist, which pays well enough to offer financial stability while also


But hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes the dream is achievable, so long as you can master two skills: creativity and flexibility. “To have both the money you need and the job you want, you have to be creative and flexible,” Dalio wrote in a LinkedIn post on Wednesday. “Start by thinking hard about if there’s anything that you’re passionate about that pays well,” Dalio writes. Dalio’s friend has a career as a commercial artist, which pays well enough to offer financial stability while also
Billionaire Ray Dalio: The 2 things you have to do to get ‘the money you need and the job you want’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, money, creative, dalio, clever, good, friend, passion, need, billionaire, career, writes, ray, job


Billionaire Ray Dalio: The 2 things you have to do to get 'the money you need and the job you want'

The dream, for most people, is to have a truly fulfilling career that is also financially lucrative.

Of course, that can seem easier said than done.

But hedge fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes the dream is achievable, so long as you can master two skills: creativity and flexibility.

“To have both the money you need and the job you want, you have to be creative and flexible,” Dalio wrote in a LinkedIn post on Wednesday.

Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, which manages roughly $160 billion in assets. He has written previously in his book on leadership and success, “Principles,” about his advice to “make your passion and your work the same thing.”

So why those traits?

If it isn’t immediately clear to you how to turn your passions into a job that comes with a reasonable paycheck, Dalio says you have to get creative and flexible in rethinking how your passions can translate.

“Start by thinking hard about if there’s anything that you’re passionate about that pays well,” Dalio writes. “Don’t be too narrow in thinking about what brings you passion and what brings you money; be clever and make some compromises. The more clever you are, the fewer compromises you will have to make.”

As an example, Dalio mentions a friend of his who loves painting, but who hasn’t been able to sell his paintings for enough money to support himself and his family. The compromise? Dalio’s friend has a career as a commercial artist, which pays well enough to offer financial stability while also allowing him to translate his passion into an “artistically creative career,” Dalio writes. The friend also has the freedom to paint for himself in his free time.

“I have found that most people can find careers that provide both good job satisfaction and good money in order to have a good life if they’re clever enough and not overly particular,” Dalio writes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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Malaysia probing 80 individuals, companies in 1MDB case

Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relationsThe latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…World Economyread more


Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relationsThe latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…World Economyread more
Malaysia probing 80 individuals, companies in 1MDB case Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
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Malaysia probing 80 individuals, companies in 1MDB case

Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relations

The latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…

World Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-07
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These stocks could have the most to lose if a progressive Democratic agenda takes hold in 2020

Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relationsThe latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…World Economyread more


Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relationsThe latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…World Economyread more
These stocks could have the most to lose if a progressive Democratic agenda takes hold in 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: emma newburger
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These stocks could have the most to lose if a progressive Democratic agenda takes hold in 2020

Close the trade deal and move on to broader US-China relations

The latest data on U.S.-China trade indicate that Beijing is not doing what it should to reduce its excessive surpluses by buying more American products, writes Dr Michael…

World Economy

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-06  Authors: emma newburger
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Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 ‘rules for success’ his dad gave him when he was 21

When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom. “When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn. Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.” Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Su


When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom. “When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn. Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.” Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Su
Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 ‘rules for success’ his dad gave him when he was 21 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
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Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 'rules for success' his dad gave him when he was 21

When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom.

“When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn.

Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.”

Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Success”:

Do at least 10% more than you are asked. Never, ever, to anybody present as fact opinions on things you don’t know. Takes great care and discipline. Be courteous and considerate always — up and down. Don’t knock, don’t complain — stick to constructive, serious criticism. Don’t be afraid to make decisions when you have the facts on which to make them. Quantify where possible. Be open-minded but skeptical. Be prompt.

His dad’s advice didn’t turn him into an overnight success by any means. Randolph, who says he never thought he’d be a tech entrepreneur, started as a failed realtor, he writes on his blog: “When I was 23, I was quite possibly the worst real estate agent in New York. I was working for my mother’s agency in Chappaqua, and no one was buying houses. In eight months, I made zero sales. I rented one apartment.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
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Billionaire Ray Dalio says this outlook will help you achieve your dreams

But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billio


But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billio
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, outlook, dreams, ray, dreamers, help, achieve, writes, ways, billionaire, impractical, facebook, dalio, successful, working


Billionaire Ray Dalio says this outlook will help you achieve your dreams

It’s often argued that some people are dreamers while others are realists. But hedge-fund billionaire Ray Dalio believes that you need both qualities to be successful. In fact, Dalio says all dreamers need a healthy dose of realism to help them achieve their dreams. “Being hyperrealistic will help you choose your dreams wisely and then achieve them,” Dalio wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday. Dalio is the founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, which manages roughly $160 billion in assets. In that social-media post, Dalio touts the importance of balancing realism and idealism by pursuing your dreams while also being as realistic as possible about the best ways to achieve them. “Understanding, accepting and working with reality is both practical and beautiful,” Dalio writes on Facebook. “I have become so much of a hyperrealist that I’ve learned to appreciate the beauty of all realities, even harsh ones, and have come to despise impractical idealism.”

By “impractical idealism,” Dalio is referring to the way of thinking that’s mostly associated with dreamers who either never follow through and pursue their lofty ideals, or who do so in impractical, or unrealistic, ways. (For instance, an impractical idealist could be more likely to spend more time daydreaming about success than actually working to achieve their goals.) But Dalio isn’t against dreaming at all, he asserts. “Don’t get me wrong: I believe in making dreams happen,” the billionaire writes on Facebook. “To me, there’s nothing better in life than doing that. The pursuit of dreams is what gives life its flavor. “My point is that people who create great things aren’t idle dreamers: They are totally grounded in reality,” he says. A 2018 Psychology Today article notes that dreaming about success is more effective when a person also imagines the realistic obstacles they’ll face on the path to their dreams. “Successful goal pursuits require figuring out which wishes are desirable and feasible and which ones to let go,” Shahram Heshmat, an associate professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Springfield, writes in the article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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Bill Gates says he retired from Microsoft nearly a decade earlier than he intended—here’s why

For years, Bill Gates couldn’t imagine doing anything besides running Microsoft, which he founded with Paul Allen in 1975 when he was still a teenager. “If you’d have asked me in my twenties if I’d ever retire early from Microsoft, I’d have told you that you were crazy,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes. “I didn’t believe in weekends, I didn’t believe in vacation.” But by the time he reached his mid-40s, “my perspective was changing,” Gates says, and “my world view was broadening.” They transf


For years, Bill Gates couldn’t imagine doing anything besides running Microsoft, which he founded with Paul Allen in 1975 when he was still a teenager. “If you’d have asked me in my twenties if I’d ever retire early from Microsoft, I’d have told you that you were crazy,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes. “I didn’t believe in weekends, I didn’t believe in vacation.” But by the time he reached his mid-40s, “my perspective was changing,” Gates says, and “my world view was broadening.” They transf
Bill Gates says he retired from Microsoft nearly a decade earlier than he intended—here’s why Cached Page below :
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Bill Gates says he retired from Microsoft nearly a decade earlier than he intended—here's why

For years, Bill Gates couldn’t imagine doing anything besides running Microsoft, which he founded with Paul Allen in 1975 when he was still a teenager.

“If you’d have asked me in my twenties if I’d ever retire early from Microsoft, I’d have told you that you were crazy,” he writes on his blog, Gates Notes.

He’s the first to admit that, especially in the early days of the company, he was obsessed with building the business. “I loved being fanatic. I reveled in it,” the self-made billionaire says in the Netflix three-episode documentary series “Inside Bill’s Brain.” “I didn’t believe in weekends, I didn’t believe in vacation.”

But by the time he reached his mid-40s, “my perspective was changing,” Gates says, and “my world view was broadening.” In 2000, he and his wife, Melinda, launched their foundation, which works to reduce inequity across the globe. They transferred $20 billion of Microsoft stock to the Gates Foundation and started traveling abroad to study health problems in poor countries.

The more involved he became with the foundation, the more he realized that his future career wasn’t going to center around building software products.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-26  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, microsoft, believe, early, writes, youd, decade, foundation, didnt, earlier, bill, retired, intendedheres, nearly, building, gates


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UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more


Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White House

There’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


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