Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th


Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. In its heyday in th
Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world’s biggest toy store. Then, they lost it. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


Toys R Us built a kingdom and the world's biggest toy store. Then, they lost it.

The toy emporium that Charles P. Lazarus envisioned has been reduced to dusty floors and empty shelves.

Much has been said about the demise of the toy empire, which this week announced its plan to liquidate. There have been fingers pointed at corporate raiders, Amazon and big-box stores. All contributed to its undoing.

Ultimately, though, Toys R Us’ collapse is a story of loyalty run dry. The store in its early days fostered devotion from customers and toymakers. In the end, it lost hold on both.

Toys R Us’ status as the most important toy store in town left it cavalier, if cocky at times, according to conversations with former employees, executives and industry insiders, who spoke to CNBC on the condition of anonymity. It didn’t invest in its stores, even as it was adding to the fleet, leaving it vulnerable when new competition moved in.

The story begins with Lazarus, the store’s visionary who wanted the “R” written backward — an ode to childlike scrawl. Lazarus, who has been described as one of the great merchants of his time, expanded a baby furniture store he owned into a toy store. By 1978, he had created a toy superstore large enough to become a public company.

In its heyday in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the most important toy store in the country, if not the world. Its strength grew as competitors Kiddie City and Child World went out of business.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-26  Authors: lauren hirsch, eduardo munoz, jacques m chenet, corbis, getty images, scott mlyn, peter foley, bloomberg, jason alden
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, toy, biggest, toys, worlds, built, went, store, lost, stores, lazarus, world, week, kingdom, important


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Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for


Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment. Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture. Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for
Iddris Sandu – Bridging the gap between technology and minorities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


Iddris Sandu - Bridging the gap between technology and minorities

While other kids were at home watching television, a 13-year-old named Iddris Sandu spent most of his childhood in the library, reading texts about the theory of relativity and studying the German industrial designer Dieter Rams.

Now 21, the self-made entrepreneur and California native has made quite a name for himself in the worlds of technology and entertainment.

With a passion for tech and culture, Sandu has written algorithms and code for tech giants like Uber, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, received the Presidental Scholar Award from President Barack Obama.

His “wunderkind” reputation has allowed him to have boldface names like NBA star Steph Curry and Tesla CEO Elon Musk on speed dial.

Private consultant, software engineer, and technologist are just a few hats Sandu wears – though, he prefers the title architect. According to Sandu, he was offered admissions to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology twice, but he declined in order to be a change agent for African-American culture.

“Most people can see, but not everyone has vision,” Sandu told CNBC in a recent interview, summarizing his life’s philosophy and entrepreneurial drive.

Back in 2009, a Steve Jobs podcast served as the spark for Sandu’s desire to learn more about the technology world. As a teenager, the child of Ghanaian parents had a a fateful encounter in a library with a designer from Google. Shortly thereafter, he landed his first internship with the tech behemoth.

Since then, the young entrepreneur has been broadening his horizons by partnering with some very prominent entertainers. Sandu recently partnered with Kanye West and Jaden Smith on a few future businesses, clothing lines and disaster relief projects that are set to launch in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-07  Authors: falyn page, source, justin wu, -iddris sandu, technology entrepreneur
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, technology, wunderkind, iddris, tech, entrepreneur, worlds, minorities, library, designer, gap, sandu, bridging, young, written


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New divorce tax rules could result in a big financial disadvantage

This change upends alimony procedures that have been in place for more than 70 years. Divorce professionals are feeling the heat as couples scramble to get written agreements in under the wire. Once the page of the calendar turns to 2019, it will be a new playing field for couples who are divorcing. And financial professionals are already concerned that deals made under the new tax law will put the person who receives alimony at a disadvantage. That means women, who are already more financially


This change upends alimony procedures that have been in place for more than 70 years. Divorce professionals are feeling the heat as couples scramble to get written agreements in under the wire. Once the page of the calendar turns to 2019, it will be a new playing field for couples who are divorcing. And financial professionals are already concerned that deals made under the new tax law will put the person who receives alimony at a disadvantage. That means women, who are already more financially
New divorce tax rules could result in a big financial disadvantage Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: lorie konish, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alimony, disadvantage, women, divorce, written, professionals, work, financial, big, wireyouve, couples, vulnerable, tax, yearsdivorce, walzer, rules, result


New divorce tax rules could result in a big financial disadvantage

This change upends alimony procedures that have been in place for more than 70 years. And it is projected to raise $6.9 billion for the IRS in the next 10 years.

Divorce professionals are feeling the heat as couples scramble to get written agreements in under the wire.

“You’ve got to have a signed agreement before the end of the year if you want your permanent support to be tax-deductible and -includable,” said Peter M. Walzer, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.

Once the page of the calendar turns to 2019, it will be a new playing field for couples who are divorcing.

And financial professionals are already concerned that deals made under the new tax law will put the person who receives alimony at a disadvantage. That means women, who are already more financially vulnerable in a divorce, might have less money to work with post-split.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: lorie konish, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alimony, disadvantage, women, divorce, written, professionals, work, financial, big, wireyouve, couples, vulnerable, tax, yearsdivorce, walzer, rules, result


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Michael Cohen’s lies to Congress about Russia could imperil Trump with Mueller

Now Cohen’s confession may have created additional legal peril for Trump as the president is being eyed by special counsel Robert Mueller. Cohen’s lies are related to an aborted plan to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. Trump last week submitted a series of written answers to questions from Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the presidential election. ABC News reported Thursday that answers included responses to questions about the Trump Tower Moscow project. Giuliani later told


Now Cohen’s confession may have created additional legal peril for Trump as the president is being eyed by special counsel Robert Mueller. Cohen’s lies are related to an aborted plan to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. Trump last week submitted a series of written answers to questions from Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the presidential election. ABC News reported Thursday that answers included responses to questions about the Trump Tower Moscow project. Giuliani later told
Michael Cohen’s lies to Congress about Russia could imperil Trump with Mueller Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: dan mangan, andrew kelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answers, imperil, lies, tower, cohens, trumps, mueller, written, project, michael, trump, cohen, told, president, individual, russia, congress


Michael Cohen's lies to Congress about Russia could imperil Trump with Mueller

President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to a new charge Thursday, revealing in detail how he had lied to Congress last year to back up Trump’s claims of having no business ties to Russia.

Now Cohen’s confession may have created additional legal peril for Trump as the president is being eyed by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Cohen’s lies are related to an aborted plan to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. He admitted in federal court in Manhattan to misleading Congress in written statements in August 2017 about the extent of Trump’s personal involvement in that project.

Cohen, 52, also said he lied by telling Congress that any contact with Russian nationals by the Trump campaign or the Trump Organization had “all terminated before the Iowa Caucus.”

That Feb. 1, 2016, event marked the formal beginning of the electoral process to select the Republican nominee for president.

Cohen told a judge Thursday that he lied to the Senate “to be consistent with Individual 1’s political messaging and out of loyalty to Individual 1.”

Cohen had noted earlier during his plea hearing that the “Individual 1” mentioned in the charging document filed against him is “the former CEO of the Trump Organization and now President of the United States.”

Trump last week submitted a series of written answers to questions from Mueller, who is investigating Russian interference in the presidential election. ABC News reported Thursday that answers included responses to questions about the Trump Tower Moscow project.

Trump’s written answers came after it was publicly known that Cohen was cooperating with Mueller’s investigation on the heels of his first guilty plea in August. Those earlier charges included tax fraud and facilitating hush-money payments shortly before the 2016 election to women who claim they had sex with Trump.

The timing of Cohen’s latest guilty plea comes just days after those answers were transmitted, immediately sparking speculation by former Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara and others that Cohen’s account of Trump’s involvement in the project could conflict with what the president has told Mueller.

Such a conflict could open Trump to a possible charge of lying to federal investigators.

Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for Trump, did not reply to about a half dozen requests for comment from CNBC.

However, Giuliani told The New York Times that Trump’s memory of the Trump Tower project jibed with Cohen’s account, and that the president had described, in his written answers to Mueller, his conversations with Cohen about the project before it died.

“The president said there was a proposal, it was discussed with Cohen, there was a nonbinding letter of intent and it didn’t go beyond that,” Giuliani told the Times, while declining to reveal either the wording of Mueller’s questions or of Trump’s answers.

Giuliani later told NBC News that Trump’s written answers to Mueller about building a Trump Tower in Moscow were consistent with what Cohen said in court.

Trump earlier on Thursday told reporters that Cohen is “a weak person” who “is lying” to get a reduced criminal sentence.

U.S. District Judge Andrew Carter asked Cohen on Thursday to “tell me what it is that you did that makes you guilty of” making false statements to Congress.

Cohen began by noting that he had served before the election as executive vice president and special counsel to Trump at the Trump Organization, the Manhattan-based real-estate firm.

By 2017, Cohen said, he was no longer in that job, but “continued to serve on several matters as an attorney” to Trump.

Cohen said he continued to also “follow the day-to-day political messaging that both” Trump “and his staff and advisors repeatedly broadcast.” He also said he stayed “in close contact” with Trump’s advisors.

“As such, I was aware of Individual 1’s repeated disavowals of commercial and political ties between himself and Russia, his repeated statements that investigations of such ties were politically motivated and without evidence, and that any contact with Russian nationals by Individual 1’s campaign or the Trump Organization had all terminated before the Iowa Caucus, which was on February 1 of 2016,” Cohen said.

Cohen said that when he was scheduled to appear before the Senate intelligence committee and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence about whether Russia was involved in or interfered in the campaign and election, he submitted a written statement to Congress about the Trump Tower Moscow project and other issues.

His description of the project “was false, I knew at the time, in that I had asserted that all efforts concerning the project had ceased in January of 2016 when, in fact, they had continued through June of 2016,” Cohen said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-29  Authors: dan mangan, andrew kelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, answers, imperil, lies, tower, cohens, trumps, mueller, written, project, michael, trump, cohen, told, president, individual, russia, congress


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Trump’s written answers to special counsel questions come after a long, tortured road

But as the Jan. 27, 2018, date neared and Mueller provided the topics he wanted to discuss, Trump’s lawyers balked. The prolonged negotiation speaks to the high stakes for Trump, Mueller’s investigation of his campaign and the presidency. The process took a significant step forward this week when Trump’s lawyers handed over the president’s written answers to some of Mueller’s questions. But it soon became clear that Mueller would want to interview Trump, given his involvement in several events u


But as the Jan. 27, 2018, date neared and Mueller provided the topics he wanted to discuss, Trump’s lawyers balked. The prolonged negotiation speaks to the high stakes for Trump, Mueller’s investigation of his campaign and the presidency. The process took a significant step forward this week when Trump’s lawyers handed over the president’s written answers to some of Mueller’s questions. But it soon became clear that Mueller would want to interview Trump, given his involvement in several events u
Trump’s written answers to special counsel questions come after a long, tortured road Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-22  Authors: jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, special, white, investigation, questions, come, answers, long, muellers, president, lawyers, trumps, mueller, tortured, interview, road, house, trump, counsel, written


Trump's written answers to special counsel questions come after a long, tortured road

The date had been picked, the location too, and the plan was penciled in: President Donald Trump would be whisked from the White House to Camp David on a quiet winter Saturday to answer questions from special counsel Robert Mueller’s team.

But as the Jan. 27, 2018, date neared and Mueller provided the topics he wanted to discuss, Trump’s lawyers balked. Attorney John Dowd then fired off a searing letter disputing Mueller’s authority to question the president. The interview was off.

Nearly a year later, Trump has still not spoken directly to Mueller’s team — and may never. Through private letters, tense meetings and considerable public posturing, the president’s lawyers have engaged in a tangled, tortured back-and-forth with the special counsel to prevent the president from sitting down for a face-to-face with enormous political and legal consequences.

The prolonged negotiation speaks to the high stakes for Trump, Mueller’s investigation of his campaign and the presidency. Any questioning of a president in a criminal investigation tests the limit of executive authority. Putting this president on the record also tests his ability to stick to the facts and risks a constitutional showdown.

The process took a significant step forward this week when Trump’s lawyers handed over the president’s written answers to some of Mueller’s questions. The arrangement was a hard-fought compromise. Trump answered only questions about Russian interference in the 2016 election and not questions about whether he has tried to obstruct the broader investigation into potential coordination between Russia and his presidential campaign. It’s unclear whether Mueller intends to push for more — either in writing or in person.

Special counsel spokesman Peter Carr declined comment.

Even those written answers were months in the making.

In the months following Mueller’s May 2017 appointment, the White House pledged its cooperation, believing it the fastest way to end the investigation. The administration produced thousands of documents sought by the special counsel and made close Trump aides — including his legal counsel, chief of staff and press secretary — available for questioning. White House lawyer Ty Cobb predicted the investigation could conclude by the end of that year.

But it soon became clear that Mueller would want to interview Trump, given his involvement in several events under scrutiny. The president had fired FBI Director James Comey, harangued his attorney general over his recusal from the Russia investigation and dictated a misleading statement about a Trump Tower meeting involving his son and a Kremlin-connected lawyer.

But Trump lawyers Dowd and Jay Sekulow moved cautiously.

The last time a president is known to have been interviewed in a criminal investigation was nearly 15 years ago, and a commander-in-chief has not been subpoenaed before a grand jury since 1998, when President Bill Clinton was summoned in the Whitewater case. Trump’s lawyers were mindful such an interview would be a minefield for a president who often misstates the facts. They set out to avoid it however possible, even if it could lead to resisting a subpoena and bringing on a court fight over presidential power.

But first they tried to head off a request. Trump’s lawyers staked out a bold constitutional argument, declaring they considered his actions as president outside a prosecutor’s bounds. Mueller had no right to question the president on any of his decisions made at the White House, they argued, saying any outside scrutiny of those choices would curb a president’s executive powers.

At the same time, they worked to undermine Mueller’s case should he choose to challenge that argument. They furnished a trove of White House documents about key moments in the investigation in hopes of undercutting any claim that he could only get the information he needed by questioning Trump, according to people familiar with the strategy.

Trump had other plans.

As his lawyers plotted to dig in against any interview, he pushed for one, believing it would exonerate him. In January, he burst into a reporters’ briefing with chief of staff John Kelly and insisted he was eager to speak to Mueller. He might do so in weeks, he said, “subject to my lawyers and all of that.”

“I would love to do that — I’d like to do it as soon as possible,” Trump said.

What he didn’t mention was that his attorneys had already discussed, and scuttled, the planned interview with Mueller. That process had even progressed to discussing logistics with Kelly, who advised of ways White House officials could get people in and out of the building without the press knowing.

But the interest cooled after Mueller team prosecutor James Quarles dictated over the phone 16 topics Mueller wanted to cover, including Trump’s interactions with Comey, his knowledge of national security adviser Michael Flynn’s interview with the FBI and his involvement in the Trump Tower statement. Dowd responded that the answers could all be found in documents and witness statements provided to Mueller. He then canceled the interview and days later drafted a feisty letter contesting the interview’s appropriateness and offering extensive explanations on the incidents in question.

The investigation has been “a considerable burden for the president and his office, has endangered the safety and security of our country, and has interfered with the president’s ability to both govern domestically and conduct foreign affairs,” Dowd wrote.

In the following months, Trump told some of his closest confidants that he still wanted to interview with Mueller, according to four White House officials and Republicans close to the White House who asked for anonymity because they were not permitted to publicly discuss private conversations. The president repeatedly insisted he had done nothing wrong and believed he could convince Mueller of that.

He told one confidant last spring he was frustrated his lawyers didn’t believe he should do it and snapped that he didn’t understand what was taking so long, according to one Republican in contact with the White House.

Tensions were on display at a March meeting where Dowd and Sekulow met with Mueller to discuss the need for an interview. Mueller said he needed to know if Trump had a “corrupt intent” when he fired Comey, such as by intending to stymie the investigation, according to a person familiar with the encounter. Dowd responded that the question was ridiculous and the answer was obviously no. Investigators at the same meeting raised the prospect of a subpoena if Trump didn’t cooperate, Dowd has said.

Later that month, Mueller’s team produced its most detailed list of questions yet — dozens, in different categories from Trump’s time as a candidate, through the transition period and into his presidency.

Trump’s own views soon began to shift. He had his first misgivings in mid-April after FBI raids on his personal lawyer Michael Cohen, thinking they were a sign that he could “not trust” Mueller, according to one of the Republicans close to Trump who spoke with the AP.

As Rudy Giuliani joined Trump’s legal team in April, the White House settled into a new strategy: Drag out the interview drama for months, and use that time to ratchet up attacks on Mueller’s credibility and complaints about the cost and time of the probe, according to the officials and advisers familiar with the strategy.

Giuliani led the charge. His scattershot arguments sometimes frustrated others in the White House, as he frequently moved the goalposts as to what would be required to have an interview. But the effect was to ensure the process would drag out longer.

Trump, meanwhile, continued complaining about the investigation even as his lawyers quietly negotiated acceptable interview terms.

A key breakthrough occurred earlier this fall when Mueller’s team said it would accept written answers on Russian election interference and collusion. The concession ensured that Mueller would get at least some on-the-record response from Trump. Prosecutors tabled questions about obstruction, reserving the right to return to that area later.

Giuliani seemed to foreclose future dialogue Tuesday, saying, “It is time to bring this inquiry to a conclusion.”

Whether Mueller agrees is a different story.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-22  Authors: jabin botsford, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, special, white, investigation, questions, come, answers, long, muellers, president, lawyers, trumps, mueller, tortured, interview, road, house, trump, counsel, written


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Trump answers written questions on Russia from special counsel Mueller: legal team

President Donald Trump has submitted answers to written questions posed to him by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office, Trump’s legal team announced Tuesday. Neither the questions from Mueller, nor the answers Trump gave the special counsel, were made public. One of Trump’s lawyers, Jay Sekulow, said, “The President today answered written questions submitted by The Special Counsel’s Office. Earlier Tuesday, Trump had told reporters that his answers to Mueller were “all finished””Te lawyers ha


President Donald Trump has submitted answers to written questions posed to him by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office, Trump’s legal team announced Tuesday. Neither the questions from Mueller, nor the answers Trump gave the special counsel, were made public. One of Trump’s lawyers, Jay Sekulow, said, “The President today answered written questions submitted by The Special Counsel’s Office. Earlier Tuesday, Trump had told reporters that his answers to Mueller were “all finished””Te lawyers ha
Trump answers written questions on Russia from special counsel Mueller: legal team Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyers, questions, legal, answers, trumps, trump, russia, today, counsel, special, written, team, mueller, president


Trump answers written questions on Russia from special counsel Mueller: legal team

President Donald Trump has submitted answers to written questions posed to him by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office, Trump’s legal team announced Tuesday.

Neither the questions from Mueller, nor the answers Trump gave the special counsel, were made public.

One of Trump’s lawyers, Jay Sekulow, said, “The President today answered written questions submitted by The Special Counsel’s Office. The questions presented dealt with issues regarding the Russia-related topics of the inquiry. The President responded in writing.”

Mueller, the former FBI director, is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. He also is looking into whether Trump’s campaign coordinated with Russians in that meddling, and whether the president personally obstructed justice in official inquiries into those questions.

Rudy Giuliani, another lawyer for Trump, said, “It has been our position from the outset that much of what has been asked raised serious constitutional issues and was beyond the scope of a legitimate inquiry.”

“This remains our position today,” Giuliani said. “The President has nonetheless provided unprecedented cooperation. The Special Counsel has been provided with more than 30 witnesses, 1.4 million pages of material, and now the President’s written responses to questions. It is time to bring this inquiry to a conclusion.”

Earlier Tuesday, Trump had told reporters that his answers to Mueller were “all finished”

“Te lawyers have them. The written answers to the witch hunt that’s been going on forever,” Trump said. “No collusion, no nothing. They’ve been finished. Finished them yesterday.”

“The lawyers have them. I assume they’ll turn them in today or soon,” the president said.

Trump repeatedly has decried Mueller’s probe.

Two weeks ago, he forced out his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, after long holding a grudge for Sessions’ decision to recuse himself from any involvement in the investigation of Russian interference in the election.

Sessions’ move in early 2017, which came as a result of his own contacts with Russians during the campaign, led several months later to the appointment of Mueller as special counsel.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-20  Authors: dan mangan, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyers, questions, legal, answers, trumps, trump, russia, today, counsel, special, written, team, mueller, president


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China sends a written response to US trade reform demands

China has delivered a written response to U.S. demands for wide-ranging trade reforms, three U.S. government sources said on Wednesday, a move that could trigger negotiations to bring an end to a withering trade war between the world’s top economies. Trump is expected to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a G20 summit in Argentina at the end of November and in early December. The U.S. president has repeatedly railed against Beijing over intellectual property theft, industrial


China has delivered a written response to U.S. demands for wide-ranging trade reforms, three U.S. government sources said on Wednesday, a move that could trigger negotiations to bring an end to a withering trade war between the world’s top economies. Trump is expected to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a G20 summit in Argentina at the end of November and in early December. The U.S. president has repeatedly railed against Beijing over intellectual property theft, industrial
China sends a written response to US trade reform demands Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, sends, china, chinese, demands, beijing, united, response, president, trade, tariffs, trump, reform


China sends a written response to US trade reform demands

China has delivered a written response to U.S. demands for wide-ranging trade reforms, three U.S. government sources said on Wednesday, a move that could trigger negotiations to bring an end to a withering trade war between the world’s top economies.

U.S. President Donald Trump has imposed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese imports to force concessions from Beijing on the list of demands that would change the terms of trade between the two countries. China has responded with import tariffs on U.S. goods.

Trump is expected to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of a G20 summit in Argentina at the end of November and in early December.

The U.S. president has repeatedly railed against Beijing over intellectual property theft, industrial subsidies, Chinese entry barriers to American businesses and the U.S. trade deficit with China.

Three U.S. government sources told Reuters on Wednesday that China had sent a response to U.S. demands on those and other issues.

The sources gave no further details on the content of the response. It was unclear if the response contained concessions that would satisfy Trump’s demands for change.

A U.S. team led by Treasury Under Secretary David Malpass discussed trade issues with a Chinese team via videoconference on Tuesday, a U.S. Treasury spokesperson said on Wednesday.

The United States had said it would not start negotiations on trade until it saw concrete proposals from China to address its concerns.

Earlier this month, after a phone conversation with Xi, Trump said he thought the United States would make a deal with China on trade but stood ready to levy more tariffs on Chinese goods if no progress is made.

The tariff rate on $200 billion in Chinese goods is set to increase to 25 percent from 10 percent on Jan. 1. Trump has also threatened to impose tariffs on all remaining Chinese imports, about $267 billion worth, if Beijing fails to address U.S. demands.

The two countries resumed talks after the call between the two leaders, ending a three month hiatus that saw relations deteriorate as the U.S. accused China of interfering in U.S. domestic politics and seeking to undermine Trump.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday said Beijing needed to change its behavior to avoid a new cold war with the United States.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, written, sends, china, chinese, demands, beijing, united, response, president, trade, tariffs, trump, reform


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What employers are looking for when they check your credit report

Employers can’t check your report without your knowledge. A credit report includes information about the standing of your financial accounts, payment history and available credit, while a credit score is an assessment of your credit report that indicates how likely you are to repay a loan. Another common credit report misconception is that monitoring your credit report will hurt your score. “You can’t do anything about your credit report until you know what’s in it,” says Griffin. Don’t miss: On


Employers can’t check your report without your knowledge. A credit report includes information about the standing of your financial accounts, payment history and available credit, while a credit score is an assessment of your credit report that indicates how likely you are to repay a loan. Another common credit report misconception is that monitoring your credit report will hurt your score. “You can’t do anything about your credit report until you know what’s in it,” says Griffin. Don’t miss: On
What employers are looking for when they check your credit report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: yoni blumberg, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cant, report, need, check, griffin, score, credit, written, looking, employers, information, wont


What employers are looking for when they check your credit report

Employers can’t check your report without your knowledge. In fact, they first need to obtain written permission. And in some states, specific other restrictions apply.

They also won’t have access to the full report. They only see a version “that omits any information that would violate equal employment laws or that the employer has no reason to receive,” says Griffin. “For example, neither date of birth nor account numbers are part of a report received by employers.”

They do not see your credit score, either. A credit report includes information about the standing of your financial accounts, payment history and available credit, while a credit score is an assessment of your credit report that indicates how likely you are to repay a loan.

“Employers never get credit scores,” says Griffin. “This is perhaps the most pervasive myth related to credit reporting.”

Another common credit report misconception is that monitoring your credit report will hurt your score. In actuality, staying on top of that information is helpful and free. So, next time you apply for a job, check your report to ensure everything is accurate and find out where you might be able to improve. It might help your chances of getting hired.

“You can’t do anything about your credit report until you know what’s in it,” says Griffin. “If there’s something you need to address, take action.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-24  Authors: yoni blumberg, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cant, report, need, check, griffin, score, credit, written, looking, employers, information, wont


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Trump’s Space Force would cost $13 Billion over 5 years: Air Force document

An internal Air Force document says President Donald Trump’s planned creation of a Space Force could cost nearly $13 billion in its first five years. The estimate is made in a memo written by Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson. She proposes pushing ahead with the transition to a Space Force whose main focus would be competition with Russia and China.


An internal Air Force document says President Donald Trump’s planned creation of a Space Force could cost nearly $13 billion in its first five years. The estimate is made in a memo written by Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson. She proposes pushing ahead with the transition to a Space Force whose main focus would be competition with Russia and China.
Trump’s Space Force would cost $13 Billion over 5 years: Air Force document Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: tom williams, cq roll call, getty images, joe skipper
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russia, force, transition, cost, space, wilson, secretary, yearsthe, trumps, document, written, billion, 13, air


Trump's Space Force would cost $13 Billion over 5 years: Air Force document

An internal Air Force document says President Donald Trump’s planned creation of a Space Force could cost nearly $13 billion in its first five years.

The estimate is made in a memo written by Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson. She proposes pushing ahead with the transition to a Space Force whose main focus would be competition with Russia and China.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-17  Authors: tom williams, cq roll call, getty images, joe skipper
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, russia, force, transition, cost, space, wilson, secretary, yearsthe, trumps, document, written, billion, 13, air


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