Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai


If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai
Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help.

As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo.

But what users can’t do yet is connect with a doctor or a therapist through the device, and it might be a few years before they can. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors.

Developers focused on digital health have concerns about using home speakers like the Echo and Google Home for medical consults because privacy issues continue to emerge and there’s too much risk in sensitive health information falling into the wrong hands. Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that thousands of employees listen in to snippets of conversations on Alexa to supposedly improve the product experience.

“It’s tricky,” said Robbie Cape, CEO of 98point6, a Seattle-based company that provides virtual medical consults via smartphones and the web. “To uphold user trust, I can imagine that Amazon Alexa would need to confirm they’re talking to the right person, but also that there’s no one else in the room listening to the conversation.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s 2018 return

Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice. Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School. The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return. Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.


Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice. Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School. The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return. Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.
3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s 2018 return Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: darla mercado, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, catherine lane, -tim steffen, cpa, director of advanced planning at robert w baird
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, werent, big, return, takeaways, taxes, total, wrong, 2018, makes, warren, warrens, elizabeth, sen, planning


3 big tax planning takeaways from Sen. Elizabeth Warren's 2018 return

Say what you will about presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., but it looks like she’s getting some good tax advice.

Warren released her 2018 tax return Wednesday. She filed jointly with her husband Bruce H. Mann, a professor at Harvard Law School.

The two reported total income of $905,742 and paid total taxes of $230,965, according to the return.

The couple didn’t get a refund. Rather, they owed the IRS $24,477 in taxes. They weren’t on the hook for underpayment penalties.

“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with her owing,” said Tim Steffen, CPA and director of advanced planning at Robert W. Baird & Co. “She makes estimated tax payments throughout the year, and we tell people that this makes the most sense — there are no penalties there.”

Here are a few tax planning takeaways from the senator’s 2018 return.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: darla mercado, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, catherine lane, -tim steffen, cpa, director of advanced planning at robert w baird
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tax, werent, big, return, takeaways, taxes, total, wrong, 2018, makes, warren, warrens, elizabeth, sen, planning


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

A toddler locked his father’s iPad for 48 years, here’s what to do if that happens to you

If someone repeatedly enters the wrong password on your iPhone or iPad over and over again, it will eventually start to delay the amount of time before you can try to enter the password again. That’s what allegedly happened to one man’s iPad, according to CNN. The man’s iPad was accidentally locked by his 3-year-old for 48 years, until 2067. If you didn’t back it up, at least you’ll be able to use your iPad or iPhone again without having to wait a few decades. Here’s what to do if you get locked


If someone repeatedly enters the wrong password on your iPhone or iPad over and over again, it will eventually start to delay the amount of time before you can try to enter the password again. That’s what allegedly happened to one man’s iPad, according to CNN. The man’s iPad was accidentally locked by his 3-year-old for 48 years, until 2067. If you didn’t back it up, at least you’ll be able to use your iPad or iPhone again without having to wait a few decades. Here’s what to do if you get locked
A toddler locked his father’s iPad for 48 years, here’s what to do if that happens to you Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: todd haselton, donaldbowers, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locked, wait, mans, youll, 48, happens, ipad, iphone, fathers, password, youve, wrong, heres, wont, toddler


A toddler locked his father's iPad for 48 years, here's what to do if that happens to you

If someone repeatedly enters the wrong password on your iPhone or iPad over and over again, it will eventually start to delay the amount of time before you can try to enter the password again. That’s what allegedly happened to one man’s iPad, according to CNN. The man’s iPad was accidentally locked by his 3-year-old for 48 years, until 2067.

If this happens to you, there’s an easy fix to get your iPad back up and running, and you won’t lose any data if you’ve been backing it up regularly. If you didn’t back it up, at least you’ll be able to use your iPad or iPhone again without having to wait a few decades.

Here’s what to do if you get locked out of your iPad or iPhone.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: todd haselton, donaldbowers, istock, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, locked, wait, mans, youll, 48, happens, ipad, iphone, fathers, password, youve, wrong, heres, wont, toddler


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

EU beats Google to the punch in setting strategy for ethical A.I.

Less than one week after Google scrapped its AI ethics council, the European Union has set out its own guidelines for achieving “trustworthy” artificial intelligence. “The ethical dimension of AI is not a luxury feature or an add-on,” said Andrus Ansip, EU vice-president for the digital single market, in a press release Monday. The EU defines artificial intelligence as systems that show “intelligent behavior,” allowing them to analyze their environment and perform tasks with some degree of auton


Less than one week after Google scrapped its AI ethics council, the European Union has set out its own guidelines for achieving “trustworthy” artificial intelligence. “The ethical dimension of AI is not a luxury feature or an add-on,” said Andrus Ansip, EU vice-president for the digital single market, in a press release Monday. The EU defines artificial intelligence as systems that show “intelligent behavior,” allowing them to analyze their environment and perform tasks with some degree of auton
EU beats Google to the punch in setting strategy for ethical A.I. Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: elizabeth schulze, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images, sopa images, contributor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, strategy, intelligence, ethics, tasks, wrong, european, beats, set, artificial, eu, setting, ai, punch, ethical


EU beats Google to the punch in setting strategy for ethical A.I.

Less than one week after Google scrapped its AI ethics council, the European Union has set out its own guidelines for achieving “trustworthy” artificial intelligence.

On Monday, the European Commission released a set of steps to maintain ethics in artificial intelligence, as companies and governments weigh both the benefits and risks of the far-reaching technology.

“The ethical dimension of AI is not a luxury feature or an add-on,” said Andrus Ansip, EU vice-president for the digital single market, in a press release Monday. “It is only with trust that our society can fully benefit from technologies.”

The EU defines artificial intelligence as systems that show “intelligent behavior,” allowing them to analyze their environment and perform tasks with some degree of autonomy. AI is already transforming businesses in a variety of functions, like automating repetitive tasks and analyzing troves of data. But the technology raises a series of ethical questions, such as how to ensure algorithms are programmed without bias and how to hold AI accountable if something goes wrong.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-08  Authors: elizabeth schulze, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images, sopa images, contributor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, strategy, intelligence, ethics, tasks, wrong, european, beats, set, artificial, eu, setting, ai, punch, ethical


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Former Navy SEAL: Don’t do this if you want to get promoted

Want to get ahead at work? Don’t fixate on landing a promotion, says former U.S. Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, who is now an author and leadership coach. Plus, only looking out for yourself might rub your coworkers the wrong way, which can hurt you in the long run. “In your mind, you think no one notices that you’re maneuvering and you’re trying to be noticed, when in reality, most of the time when you’re trying to stand up above everyone else … everyone else on the team notices and they don’t like i


Want to get ahead at work? Don’t fixate on landing a promotion, says former U.S. Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, who is now an author and leadership coach. Plus, only looking out for yourself might rub your coworkers the wrong way, which can hurt you in the long run. “In your mind, you think no one notices that you’re maneuvering and you’re trying to be noticed, when in reality, most of the time when you’re trying to stand up above everyone else … everyone else on the team notices and they don’t like i
Former Navy SEAL: Don’t do this if you want to get promoted Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: kathleen elkins, jocko willink, -jocko willink, former us navy seal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, willink, title, work, promoted, wrong, youre, notices, team, seal, navy, trying, way


Former Navy SEAL: Don't do this if you want to get promoted

Want to get ahead at work? Don’t fixate on landing a promotion, says former U.S. Navy SEAL Jocko Willink, who is now an author and leadership coach.

If you’re focused on earning a title change or salary bump, he tells CNBC Make It, “you start to miss out on the things that are important parts of your job,” such as being a team player or supporting your boss.

Plus, only looking out for yourself might rub your coworkers the wrong way, which can hurt you in the long run. “In your mind, you think no one notices that you’re maneuvering and you’re trying to be noticed, when in reality, most of the time when you’re trying to stand up above everyone else … everyone else on the team notices and they don’t like it,” he says.

That means that “when the opportunity comes for them to pull you down, they’re going to take it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: kathleen elkins, jocko willink, -jocko willink, former us navy seal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, willink, title, work, promoted, wrong, youre, notices, team, seal, navy, trying, way


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Ex-Navy SEAL: This mentality ‘rubs everybody the wrong way’ but it led to my success

David Goggins is the only member of the U.S. armed forces ever to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. Today, at age 44, the retired SEAL is an accomplished endurance athlete, having competed in more than 60 ultra-marathons, triathlons, and ultra-triathlons and having won a handful of them. Goggins credits his success to what he calls the “day one, week one” mentality. He lives each day like it’s the first day of the first week of a new job. While


David Goggins is the only member of the U.S. armed forces ever to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. Today, at age 44, the retired SEAL is an accomplished endurance athlete, having competed in more than 60 ultra-marathons, triathlons, and ultra-triathlons and having won a handful of them. Goggins credits his success to what he calls the “day one, week one” mentality. He lives each day like it’s the first day of the first week of a new job. While
Ex-Navy SEAL: This mentality ‘rubs everybody the wrong way’ but it led to my success Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: kathleen elkins, -david goggins, retired navy seal, best-selling author
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youve, mentality, seal, success, week, job, way, rubs, york, exnavy, day, air, led, having, wrong, youre, everybody


Ex-Navy SEAL: This mentality 'rubs everybody the wrong way' but it led to my success

David Goggins is the only member of the U.S. armed forces ever to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger and Air Force Tactical Air Controller.

He’s also a former Guinness World Record holder for completing 4,030 pull-ups in 17 hours. Today, at age 44, the retired SEAL is an accomplished endurance athlete, having competed in more than 60 ultra-marathons, triathlons, and ultra-triathlons and having won a handful of them. He’s also the New York Times best-selling author of “Can’t Hurt Me.”

Goggins credits his success to what he calls the “day one, week one” mentality. He lives each day like it’s the first day of the first week of a new job. While this mindset “rubs everybody the wrong way,” he says, it works.

Think back to the last time you were trying to land a new position, he says: “Before you go to a job interview, you lay your clothes out. You’ve got your bowl out for your oatmeal, your protein shake, everything is laid out. You show up 30 minutes early. You’re prepped. You studied.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-04  Authors: kathleen elkins, -david goggins, retired navy seal, best-selling author
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youve, mentality, seal, success, week, job, way, rubs, york, exnavy, day, air, led, having, wrong, youre, everybody


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

5 places to retire where you can feel rich, yet live on a budget

You don’t need a million dollars to live a luxurious retirement — so long as you’re willing to leave the United States behind. “Most people assume that a high-flying existence like that is the purview of the rich and famous alone,” said Jennifer Stevens, the executive editor of International Living. They’re wrong, Stevens said. The website for expatriates is out with a list of “5 Places to Live Like the Rich and Famous…Without their Bank Balance.” Around 680,000 Americans currently receive their


You don’t need a million dollars to live a luxurious retirement — so long as you’re willing to leave the United States behind. “Most people assume that a high-flying existence like that is the purview of the rich and famous alone,” said Jennifer Stevens, the executive editor of International Living. They’re wrong, Stevens said. The website for expatriates is out with a list of “5 Places to Live Like the Rich and Famous…Without their Bank Balance.” Around 680,000 Americans currently receive their
5 places to retire where you can feel rich, yet live on a budget Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: annie nova, atlantide phototravel, corbis documentary, getty images, carol yepes, moment, lokman ilhan, anadolu agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retire, rich, feel, united, willing, wrong, youre, budget, stevens, places, bank, live, states, website


5 places to retire where you can feel rich, yet live on a budget

You don’t need a million dollars to live a luxurious retirement — so long as you’re willing to leave the United States behind.

“Most people assume that a high-flying existence like that is the purview of the rich and famous alone,” said Jennifer Stevens, the executive editor of International Living.

They’re wrong, Stevens said.

The website for expatriates is out with a list of “5 Places to Live Like the Rich and Famous…Without their Bank Balance.”

Around 680,000 Americans currently receive their Social Security checks at a foreign addresses, yet the number of retirees abroad is likely higher since many people keep their U.S. bank account.

Here are the five destinations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-29  Authors: annie nova, atlantide phototravel, corbis documentary, getty images, carol yepes, moment, lokman ilhan, anadolu agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retire, rich, feel, united, willing, wrong, youre, budget, stevens, places, bank, live, states, website


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Goldman says investors are looking at the wrong bond market indicator and a recession is less likely

That scary bond market warning about a recession might not be the right thing to be watching after all. The Goldman strategists noted that these spreads typically react early to recession risks. In the last several months, the 2-year note yield has risen above the 3-year and 5-year note yields, and had been above the 7-year yield. Investors get concerned when the yield curve inverts because it’s not a good sign for the economy in general. The strategists note that significant market drawdowns be


That scary bond market warning about a recession might not be the right thing to be watching after all. The Goldman strategists noted that these spreads typically react early to recession risks. In the last several months, the 2-year note yield has risen above the 3-year and 5-year note yields, and had been above the 7-year yield. Investors get concerned when the yield curve inverts because it’s not a good sign for the economy in general. The strategists note that significant market drawdowns be
Goldman says investors are looking at the wrong bond market indicator and a recession is less likely Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looking, goldman, wrong, 10year, rates, note, yields, bond, strategists, indicator, investors, yield, market, likely, recession, curve


Goldman says investors are looking at the wrong bond market indicator and a recession is less likely

That scary bond market warning about a recession might not be the right thing to be watching after all.

Goldman Sachs strategists, in a note, said yes, the yield curve has inverted, but in an unusual way, and it’s not sending the same powerful recession signal it has in the past.

On Friday, the 10-year to 3-month curve inverted, meaning 10-year Treasury yields dipped below the yield on the 3-month bill, for the first time in seven years.

The Goldman strategists, however, point out that it is unusual for that part of the curve to invert first, while the more commonly watched spread is between the 10-year and 2-year note and that usually inverts sooner. That’s because it’s where the market prices the Federal Reserve’s anticipated interest rates moves. The Fed, on the other hand, favors watching the 3-month spread.

Now, the 2-year yield has been falling more slowly than the 10-year, which dipped below 2.38 percent Monday, and was at 2.44 percent Tuesday.

The Goldman analysts, like others, are blaming the slide in the U.S. 10-year yield on the pressures of the global bond market, where low and negative rates had driven buyers into Treasurys. Yields move opposite price, so they can decline as buyers purchase bonds.

“This dynamic has probably been supported by international spillovers from non-US rates where QE [quantitative easing] and low growth and inflation expectations have supported lower 10y rates,” they wrote. “As a result, the curve inversion signal could be less powerful for recessions than in the past since long dated yields across regions have become more correlated.”

Source: Goldman Sachs

Another important factor to note is that credit spreads did not increase in a material way last week. The Goldman strategists noted that these spreads typically react early to recession risks.

The strategists said they tracked the portion of the curve that is inverted and found it is still weak compared with the last four recessions, when more than 70 percent of the curve was inverted. In the last several months, the 2-year note yield has risen above the 3-year and 5-year note yields, and had been above the 7-year yield.

Investors get concerned when the yield curve inverts because it’s not a good sign for the economy in general. Banks tend to borrow short term and lend to businesses and consumers for longer periods of time, so lending becomes more difficult when short-term rates are higher than longer-term yields.

Source: Goldman Sachs

Stocks and other risk assets can do well with a flat yield curve, and that supports the Goldman strategists’ view that returns will be positive for stocks despite the lack of profit growth and less positive macro environment.

The strategists note that significant market drawdowns began once the yield curve starts steepening, after being inverted.

“Of course this cycle has been different given the ultra low level of rates and so historical results may not carry through directly, but we would expect recession risk remains somewhat low even amid an environment of lower returns” and high volatility, they noted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-26  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, looking, goldman, wrong, 10year, rates, note, yields, bond, strategists, indicator, investors, yield, market, likely, recession, curve


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

British Airways flight bound for Germany lands in Scotland by mistake

The flight on Monday seemed to go perfectly well, until passengers realized that their plane had landed in both the wrong city and the wrong country. The British Airways flight from London City Airport was supposed to head to Duesseldorf, Germany, but ended up in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland. The airline said Monday the problem started when an incorrect flight plan was filed by WDL Aviation, which operated the flight on behalf of British Airways. Officials say the pilot followed the flight


The flight on Monday seemed to go perfectly well, until passengers realized that their plane had landed in both the wrong city and the wrong country. The British Airways flight from London City Airport was supposed to head to Duesseldorf, Germany, but ended up in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland. The airline said Monday the problem started when an incorrect flight plan was filed by WDL Aviation, which operated the flight on behalf of British Airways. Officials say the pilot followed the flight
British Airways flight bound for Germany lands in Scotland by mistake Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: pasal pavani, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, city, edinburgh, plan, mistake, bound, lands, scotland, duesseldorf, wrong, british, officials, aviation, airways, flight, germany


British Airways flight bound for Germany lands in Scotland by mistake

The flight on Monday seemed to go perfectly well, until passengers realized that their plane had landed in both the wrong city and the wrong country.

The British Airways flight from London City Airport was supposed to head to Duesseldorf, Germany, but ended up in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland.

The airline said Monday the problem started when an incorrect flight plan was filed by WDL Aviation, which operated the flight on behalf of British Airways. Officials say the pilot followed the flight plan for Edinburgh, and that air traffic control officials also were following the same flight plan and saw nothing amiss.

WDL aviation said it was trying to determine the cause of the “obviously unfortunate mix-up.”

The flight was refuelled and set off again, this time directly to Duesseldorf.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: pasal pavani, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, city, edinburgh, plan, mistake, bound, lands, scotland, duesseldorf, wrong, british, officials, aviation, airways, flight, germany


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes

Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes15 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Personal finance expert Suze Orman shares what you’re doing wrong on your taxes and how to fix it.


Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes15 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Personal finance expert Suze Orman shares what you’re doing wrong on your taxes and how to fix it.
Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suze, view, taxes, youre, orman, browser, try, flash, taxes15, enabled, biggest, wrong, mistakes


Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes

Suze Orman: This is one of the biggest mistakes people make on their taxes

15 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Personal finance expert Suze Orman shares what you’re doing wrong on your taxes and how to fix it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suze, view, taxes, youre, orman, browser, try, flash, taxes15, enabled, biggest, wrong, mistakes


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post