In a bad sign for trade talks, Trump deploys a new label for China’s Xi – ‘enemy’

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Even as trade tensions continued to heat up, President Donald Trump would make sure to refer to China’s president, Xi Jinping, as his “friend.” On Friday, though, Trump unveiled a new label for his Chinese counterpart: “enemy.” “My only question is, who is our bigger enemy, Jay Powell or Chairman Xi?” Trump also said Friday that he had “hereby ord


Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Even as trade tensions continued to heat up, President Donald Trump would make sure to refer to China’s president, Xi Jinping, as his “friend.” On Friday, though, Trump unveiled a new label for his Chinese counterpart: “enemy.” “My only question is, who is our bigger enemy, Jay Powell or Chairman Xi?” Trump also said Friday that he had “hereby ord
In a bad sign for trade talks, Trump deploys a new label for China’s Xi – ‘enemy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, question, deploys, sign, label, xi, enemy, chinas, trumps, trump, tariffs, trade, jinping, bad, chairman, president, talks, chinese


In a bad sign for trade talks, Trump deploys a new label for China's Xi – 'enemy'

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017.

Even as trade tensions continued to heat up, President Donald Trump would make sure to refer to China’s president, Xi Jinping, as his “friend.” On Friday, though, Trump unveiled a new label for his Chinese counterpart: “enemy.”

In one of a series of tweets that rattled markets, the president posed a question to his more than 60 million followers comparing Xi to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

“My only question is, who is our bigger enemy, Jay Powell or Chairman Xi?” Trump wrote.

The tweet came shortly after China announced that it will impose 5%-10% tariffs on $75 billion worth of U.S. goods and reinstate duties on American autos. The tariffs will come in two batches, on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15, which are the same days that Trump’s newest round of tariffs on Chinese goods will go into effect.

The S&P 500 index of large publicly traded companies was down about 1.8% Friday morning after briefly going positive. Trump also said Friday that he had “hereby ordered” U.S. firms to seek an “alternative ” to China.

At first blush, Trump’s comment was striking not for its slam on the communist leader, but for the critique of the American central bank chairman whom Trump himself appointed.

But it also suggests that the president’s personal relationship with Xi, which Trump has touted as the best route to completing a major trade deal uniting the world’s two largest economies, is at a low point.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, question, deploys, sign, label, xi, enemy, chinas, trumps, trump, tariffs, trade, jinping, bad, chairman, president, talks, chinese


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JP Morgan says new US tariffs will test China’s ability to prop up its economy

President Donald Trump meets with China’s President Xi Jinping at the start of their bilateral meeting at the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. New U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods could deal another blow to the Asian economic giant — and it’s not clear how much more Beijing can do to prop up its economy, an economist from J.P. Morgan said on Friday. Since the ongoing tariff fight between Washington and Beijing started about a year ago, Chinese authorities have used both monetary a


President Donald Trump meets with China’s President Xi Jinping at the start of their bilateral meeting at the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019. New U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods could deal another blow to the Asian economic giant — and it’s not clear how much more Beijing can do to prop up its economy, an economist from J.P. Morgan said on Friday. Since the ongoing tariff fight between Washington and Beijing started about a year ago, Chinese authorities have used both monetary a
JP Morgan says new US tariffs will test China’s ability to prop up its economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economy, ability, chinese, economic, xi, damage, chinas, encouraging, beijing, morgan, president, tariffs, jp, economist, test, prop


JP Morgan says new US tariffs will test China's ability to prop up its economy

President Donald Trump meets with China’s President Xi Jinping at the start of their bilateral meeting at the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.

New U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods could deal another blow to the Asian economic giant — and it’s not clear how much more Beijing can do to prop up its economy, an economist from J.P. Morgan said on Friday.

Since the ongoing tariff fight between Washington and Beijing started about a year ago, Chinese authorities have used both monetary and fiscal policies to limit the economic damage brought on by elevated U.S. tariffs. Those measures have worked to some extent, according to Bruce Kasman, chief economist and head of global economic research at the investment bank.

“I think it’s encouraging to see they’ve been moving on multiple fronts, it’s encouraging to see that it’s having some effect on the economy,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“But boy, we just haven’t seen how far the latest damage is going to be,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: yen nee lee
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Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji


President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters. Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ” All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beiji
Trump clarifies ‘personal meeting’ tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Trump clarifies 'personal meeting' tweet, suggests Xi should meet Hong Kong protesters

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he has “no doubt” that Chinese President Xi Jinping could bring an end to the unrest in Hong Kong by meeting face to face with the protesters.

Trump said this in a tweet Thursday morning, less than a day after he first appeared to propose that a “personal meeting” between himself and Xi could bring a speedy end to “the Hong Kong problem. ”

All aspects of the U.S.-China relationship have come under intense scrutiny, as the escalating trade war between Beijing and Washington roils global markets and tensions ratchet up between mainland China and protesters in semiautonomous Hong Kong.

Trump has been criticized for taking an ambiguous stance on the Chinese government’s action in Hong Kong, where hundreds of thousands of people have taken to the streets originally to protest a divisive extradition bill supported by Beijing.

Fights have erupted at the protests, and the threat of increased violence has hovered over the demonstrations, which included storming government buildings and occupying the city’s airport.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Trump just blinked, giving China a possible edge in trade war, Jim Chanos and others say

In backing off on China tariffs Tuesday, President Donald Trump showed just how much pain the U.S. could tolerate — and China may use that to its advantage, key voices on Wall Street say. John Rutledge, chief investment officer of global principal investment house Safanad, said the trade war is causing pain on both sides. In China, Rutledge said Xi is feeling pressure to show strength in the trade war, while Washington is grappling with mounting political pressure and costs to consumers. The pre


In backing off on China tariffs Tuesday, President Donald Trump showed just how much pain the U.S. could tolerate — and China may use that to its advantage, key voices on Wall Street say. John Rutledge, chief investment officer of global principal investment house Safanad, said the trade war is causing pain on both sides. In China, Rutledge said Xi is feeling pressure to show strength in the trade war, while Washington is grappling with mounting political pressure and costs to consumers. The pre
Trump just blinked, giving China a possible edge in trade war, Jim Chanos and others say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, tariff, possible, china, xi, giving, say, rutledge, edge, white, chanos, market, war, trump, jim, tariffs


Trump just blinked, giving China a possible edge in trade war, Jim Chanos and others say

In backing off on China tariffs Tuesday, President Donald Trump showed just how much pain the U.S. could tolerate — and China may use that to its advantage, key voices on Wall Street say.

Markets rallied on the announcement by the U.S. Trade Representative office that certain items were being removed from the new tariff list, while duties on others would be delayed until mid-December.

The short-seller Jim Chanos, who tweets under the alter ego “Diogenes,” hinted that Chinese President Xi Jinping may take this as a sign that the U.S. may cave with enough pressure.

“So then tell me why Xi should not continue to wait out The World’s Greatest Negotiator, who keeps ‘dealing’ with himself?” tweeted Chanos, founder and managing Partner of Kynikos Associates.

Some investors took Tuesday’s announcement as a sign that despite the White House’s claim that China would bear the brunt of tariff impacts, the trade war was indeed hurting consumers. The products in the group exempt from tariffs include cellphones, some apparel, and video games — all of which are crucial to the U.S. consumer market, especially during the holiday shopping season. Trump announced on Aug. 1 that 10% tariffs would go into effect on Sept. 1 on the remaining $300 billion worth of Chinese imports that had not been slapped with U.S. duties.

Trump told reporters Tuesday afternoon that he postponed tariffs for the Christmas season “in case it had an impact on shopping” and the delay would “help a lot of people.”

Hedge fund manager and Hayman Capital Management founder Kyle Bass said based on the tariff de-escalation, “it does look like President Trump has blinked.” While Trump has been vocal in the tariff fight, Bass said “every time it makes the stock market go down a few hundred points” the president “backs away.”

“It looks like he doesn’t want the price of iPhones going up into Christmas,” Bass said on CNBC’s “Squawk Alley ” Tuesday. “The Chinese are going to read this as a key weakness.”

China meanwhile, has not publicly backed off. It announced last week that it would not resume buying U.S. agricultural products, despite assurances otherwise by Xi to Trump at the June G-20 summit. It also has retaliated with its own tariffs on U.S. goods and set off more worries about the trade war on Friday by letting its currency weaken.

John Rutledge, chief investment officer of global principal investment house Safanad, said the trade war is causing pain on both sides. In China, Rutledge said Xi is feeling pressure to show strength in the trade war, while Washington is grappling with mounting political pressure and costs to consumers.

But that can change quickly, Rutledge said, depending on which of Trump’s trade advisors have his ear at the moment.

“There’s a battle of the bands among advisors — this may be just a tick up as the rational group prevailed,” Rutledge said, referring to White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, whom he calls “market thinkers” in opposition to trade hawk and advisor Peter Navarro.

Still, Rutledge said its nearly impossible to predict the White House’s next move and investors should take this as “one day and one data point.”

“We shouldn’t extrapolate or draw a trend, since it might get revered,” Rutledge said.

The president’s top priorities — a strong stock market and a tough China trade deal — have been at odds. Uncertainty around the trade war has weighed on financial markets. Stocks saw their worst day of the year on Aug. 5 after China let its currency weaken below 7 yuan to the dollar and made its announcement about U.S. farm products.

“The White House is now delaying the tariffs and removing some items. Did some acronym called the SPX cause someone to blink?,” David Rosenberg, chief economist and strategist at Gluskin Sheff & Associates, said in a tweet.

China’s Commerce Ministry said Vice Premier Liu He had a phone call with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lightizer and Mnuchin. Trade talks are set to continue in two weeks. According to Chinese news outlet CGTN, the call for the world’s two largest economies to meet again on trade came from Lighthizer, not China.

So far, the pain felt by the stock market has not been that exaggerated. At its low point for this sell-off, the S&P 500 was down only a little more than 6% from its high.

“These developments are modestly positive, especially compared to the recent torrent of negative news, but we caution against viewing the tariff delay as anything more than an attempt to partially shield the American consumer heading into the holiday season,” Isaac Boltansky of Compass Point Research wrote in a note to clients. “We continue to believe that a broad deal will not emerge prior to the 2020 election.”

Trump, himself, accused China last week of trying to wait out the 2020 election for a trade deal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, tariff, possible, china, xi, giving, say, rutledge, edge, white, chanos, market, war, trump, jim, tariffs


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China says there will be no trade deal unless existing tariffs are stripped

Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump attend their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka on June 29, 2019. The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday. “If the two sides are to reach a deal, all imposed tariffs must be removed,” Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said on Thursday. “China’s attitude on that is clear and consistent.”


Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump attend their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka on June 29, 2019. The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday. “If the two sides are to reach a deal, all imposed tariffs must be removed,” Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said on Thursday. “China’s attitude on that is clear and consistent.”
China says there will be no trade deal unless existing tariffs are stripped Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stripped, commerce, ministry, china, unless, chinese, chinas, trade, trump, xi, existing, tariffs, deal, president


China says there will be no trade deal unless existing tariffs are stripped

Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and US President Donald Trump attend their bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka on June 29, 2019.

The U.S. has to lift all the tariffs placed on Chinese goods if there is to be a trade deal, China’s Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday.

“If the two sides are to reach a deal, all imposed tariffs must be removed,” Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said on Thursday. “China’s attitude on that is clear and consistent.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: yun li
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China appears to be the winner of the Trump-Xi meeting at G-20, experts say

In addition, Trump said he agreed to allow Huawei to purchase U.S. products and China will buy “large amounts” of American farm produce. Washington had earlier announced a ban that restricts Huawei’s ability to do business with U.S. firms due to national security concerns. Trump’s apparently softer stance on the Chinese tech giant was seen by some observers as a major concession that the U.S. has granted China. “It is looking like, so far, China is coming out as a winner from this G-20,” Frances


In addition, Trump said he agreed to allow Huawei to purchase U.S. products and China will buy “large amounts” of American farm produce. Washington had earlier announced a ban that restricts Huawei’s ability to do business with U.S. firms due to national security concerns. Trump’s apparently softer stance on the Chinese tech giant was seen by some observers as a major concession that the U.S. has granted China. “It is looking like, so far, China is coming out as a winner from this G-20,” Frances
China appears to be the winner of the Trump-Xi meeting at G-20, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, say, xi, experts, chief, trump, meeting, trumpxi, agreed, products, g20, winner, told, trade, appears, china, squawk


China appears to be the winner of the Trump-Xi meeting at G-20, experts say

U.S. President Donald Trump has touted his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the weekend as “far better than expected” — but several trade and investment experts said Beijing appears to have gained the upper hand in the trade war.

Trump and Xi agreed at the G-20 summit in Japan to withhold from slapping additional tariffs on each other’s products as the two sides return to the negotiating table in a bid to finalize a trade agreement. In addition, Trump said he agreed to allow Huawei to purchase U.S. products and China will buy “large amounts” of American farm produce.

Washington had earlier announced a ban that restricts Huawei’s ability to do business with U.S. firms due to national security concerns. Trump’s apparently softer stance on the Chinese tech giant was seen by some observers as a major concession that the U.S. has granted China.

“It is looking like, so far, China is coming out as a winner from this G-20,” Francesco Filia, chief executive and chief investment officer at asset management firm Fasanara Capital, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“It’s not even clear what they gave up in order to get it,” he said, noting there was a lack of details about what the two leaders agreed on at the meeting.

Filia is not the only one who has expressed skepticism over the U.S.-China trade developments.

Trump standing down on some of his threats to China was “one of the most concerning outcomes at the G-20,” said Danielle DiMartino Booth, chief executive of research firm Quill Intelligence.

“It looks as if he obviously gave a lot of ground back to China,” she told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia” on Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-03  Authors: yen nee lee
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European stocks open higher as Trump says US-China trade talks underway

European stocks opened higher again on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump said that trade talks with China, which had stalled in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the weekend. The pan-European Stoxx 600 rose 0.2% after the opening bell, basic resources emerging as the strongest performing sector with a 0.6% rise in early deals.


European stocks opened higher again on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump said that trade talks with China, which had stalled in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the weekend. The pan-European Stoxx 600 rose 0.2% after the opening bell, basic resources emerging as the strongest performing sector with a 0.6% rise in early deals.
European stocks open higher as Trump says US-China trade talks underway Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, european, trump, higher, president, xi, stoxx, underway, open, stalled, talks, trade, uschina, stocks, strongest, weekendthe


European stocks open higher as Trump says US-China trade talks underway

European stocks opened higher again on Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump said that trade talks with China, which had stalled in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the weekend.

The pan-European Stoxx 600 rose 0.2% after the opening bell, basic resources emerging as the strongest performing sector with a 0.6% rise in early deals.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: elliot smith
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Trump is laying groundwork for a new world order built around the US, China and Russia

U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. An olive branch to ChinaIgnoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. He is a winner and


U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. An olive branch to ChinaIgnoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. He is a winner and
Trump is laying groundwork for a new world order built around the US, China and Russia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
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Trump is laying groundwork for a new world order built around the US, China and Russia

U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping shake hands before their bilateral meeting during the G-20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan on June 29, 2019. Kevin Lamarque | Reuters

President Donald Trump showed during last week’s Group of 20 meeting in Osaka, Japan what he meant by repeated off-the-cuff remarks that he wanted to build good relations with Russia and China. He had an apparently friendly and wide-ranging discussion with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin on Friday. The two leaders agreed that American and Russian officials would continue their consultations about global and regional issues, and ways of improving and expanding bilateral political and economic ties. That was followed Saturday by Trump’s meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping who — in a dig at the U.S. — extolled multilateralism and sharply criticized trade protectionism in his opening remarks to the G-20 plenary session. Xi reiterated those views by saying that he wanted cooperation rather than “friction and confrontation.” Eventually, the Trump-Xi meeting ended up on a conciliatory note. Additional trade tariffs will be put to the side, and the two countries’ negotiating teams will pick up where they left off when trade talks were interrupted a month ago.

An olive branch to China

Ignoring complaints of American companies about discriminatory treatment in China, Xi also asked that the Chinese businesses should be treated fairly by U.S. authorities. Trump obliged by allowing American firms to sell technology to Chinese telecom giant Huawei in areas that were not critical to national security. What does that all mean? First and foremost, it signals the beginning of Trump’s firm focus on his reelection campaign, where a scuffle, or worse, with Russia and China would be a devastating event and leave him as a one-term player — even in the context of a rather uninspiring lineup of Democratic competitors. Calming things down with two countries branded by Washington as strategic competitors hell-bent on undermining America’s world order is a priority — “for now,” as Trump likes to say. And, as he also would say, “we shall see later,” presumably after his reelection. Will that fly as a feasible election strategy? Yes it will, because, as said earlier, Trump correctly sees that picking a fight with Russia and China is an existential threat to humanity Americans and the rest of the world would not support. So, Trump looks for peaceful and negotiated solutions with Russia in Syria, Ukraine and Venezuela, with a carrot for Moscow in opening up huge opportunities for American businesses eager to expand their operations in the country’s investment-starved enormous territories. In fact, the American business delegation was one of the largest at the recent economic forum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Moscow’s allegedly key policy influence within the OPEC oil cartel is also seen as a precious help in holding energy prices down, and staying the Federal Reserve’s hand in hiking interest rates to forestall energy-driven inflation pressures.

Trump assist for Japan’s winner

Iran is another issue where Russia has a helpful hand. That’s in sharp contrast with America’s closest allies — the United Kingdom, France and Germany — who not only publicly disagree with the U.S. on Iran, but also actively oppose Washington’s Iran sanctions and have established a special payment facility to do business with Tehran. China is an entirely different problem. While Russia could be an irritant in some global issues and in managing Europe’s centuries-old hatreds, China is already a very credible challenge to American world order — seriously undermining Washington’s increasingly unstable trans-Atlantic and Asian alliances. Some observers have already determined that Trump lost last week in his trade and security confrontation with China. That is a hasty, thoughtless and unworthy assessment. It is true, however, that Trump’s trade armistice with China was dictated by his domestic considerations. It is also true that Trump appeared to be scaling back his ill-advised political overreach under the guise of his unassailable trade case against China. The bottom line, again, for now, is that Trump will have to settle for China’s commitment to cut its American trade surpluses, but he definitely has to forget about interfering in China’s legislative process and economic policies – hot-button issues that China calls “issues of principle.” Trump wasted two-and-a-half years and $1 trillion of American money (rising trade deficits with China) in pursuit of political objectives that he should have known China would never accept. Whoever pushed Trump in that direction deserves his signature “You’re fired!” scream. But Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe deserves kudos. He is a winner and a happy man: Trump pushed China into his lap. Abe, as a result, should be the first to thank Trump for making Japan’s impossible dream come true. Xi, who looked like he was holding his nose during years of photo ops with Abe, last week accepted an invitation to pay a state visit to Japan next spring. Let’s see now how Trump manages Japan, its huge and systematic annual trade surpluses of about $70 billion on American trades, and Washington’s irrevocable obligation to unconditionally defend what is still called America’s key Asian ally. Putting it all together and lifting the sights from here and now, Trump may have started a process of enduring world peace. That concept is based on the idea that the U.S., Russia and China have been staring for years at an underlying security architecture of a uniquely binary choice: The end of humanity, or a new, hopefully American, world order built around those three key players whose economic and civilizational interests call for peaceful co-existence.

Investment thoughts


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
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Trump says renewed trade talks with China have ‘already begun’

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, May 14, 2019. President Donald Trump said Monday that trade talks with China, which had stalled out in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend. The renewed talks were being held by phone, Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. The president added that any deal between the two economic


President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, May 14, 2019. President Donald Trump said Monday that trade talks with China, which had stalled out in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend. The renewed talks were being held by phone, Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. The president added that any deal between the two economic
Trump says renewed trade talks with China have ‘already begun’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, talks, president, china, meeting, trade, phone, renewed, added, trump, yeah, donald, xi, begun


Trump says renewed trade talks with China have 'already begun'

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, May 14, 2019.

President Donald Trump said Monday that trade talks with China, which had stalled out in May, have “already begun” following his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G-20 summit over the weekend.

The renewed talks were being held by phone, Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. The president added that any deal between the two economic superpowers would need to lean in the U.S.’ favor.

“They’re speaking very much on the phone but they’re also meeting. Yeah, it’s essentially already begun,” Trump said. “It actually began before our meeting.”

“It has to be better for us than for them because they had such a big advantage for so many years,” Trump added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: kevin breuninger
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US Treasury yields rise as US-China trade truce dents appetite for safe-haven assets

U.S. Treasuries retreated after a trade truce between the U.S. and China dented investor appetite for safe-haven assets. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.0117%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 2.5364%. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the world’s two largest economies agreed to resume trade negotiations over the weekend. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping


U.S. Treasuries retreated after a trade truce between the U.S. and China dented investor appetite for safe-haven assets. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.0117%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 2.5364%. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the world’s two largest economies agreed to resume trade negotiations over the weekend. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping
US Treasury yields rise as US-China trade truce dents appetite for safe-haven assets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: sam meredith, yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, trump, higher, assets, xi, yields, rise, truce, treasury, agreed, chinese, yield, trade, uschina, tariffs, safehaven, dents, appetite


US Treasury yields rise as US-China trade truce dents appetite for safe-haven assets

U.S. Treasuries retreated after a trade truce between the U.S. and China dented investor appetite for safe-haven assets.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.0117%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 2.5364%.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the world’s two largest economies agreed to resume trade negotiations over the weekend.

President Donald Trump offered concessions to his Chinese counterpart when the two leaders met on the sidelines of the Group of Twenty (G-20) summit in Japan last week. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed not to impose new tariffs on U.S. and Chinese goods. The U.S. said they would hold off on the potential 25% tariffs on the remaining $300 billion of imports from China and China said they would continue to buy U.S. agricultural products.

These included no new charges and an easing of restrictions on Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei in order to soothe tensions with Beijing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: sam meredith, yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, trump, higher, assets, xi, yields, rise, truce, treasury, agreed, chinese, yield, trade, uschina, tariffs, safehaven, dents, appetite


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