This wacky daily trading strategy posted a 13% return in this rough year

According to Bespoke Investment Group, if one had implemented this so-called after hours strategy every day in 2018, it could’ve posted a 13.3 percent return. “This has really been an intraday bear market, with more than 100 percent of the selling coming during regular trading hours. Since SPY’s peak on Sep. 20, you’d still be up 3.3 percent if you only owned outside of regular trading hours!” However, this trading strategy doesn’t entail any fundamental backing so it is likely impossible to pre


According to Bespoke Investment Group, if one had implemented this so-called after hours strategy every day in 2018, it could’ve posted a 13.3 percent return. “This has really been an intraday bear market, with more than 100 percent of the selling coming during regular trading hours. Since SPY’s peak on Sep. 20, you’d still be up 3.3 percent if you only owned outside of regular trading hours!” However, this trading strategy doesn’t entail any fundamental backing so it is likely impossible to pre
This wacky daily trading strategy posted a 13% return in this rough year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-31  Authors: yun li, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, posted, hours, trading, 13, day, regular, 500, market, sp, wacky, selling, daily, rough, return, strategy


This wacky daily trading strategy posted a 13% return in this rough year

Buy the S&P 500 at the close every day and sell it at the next open. Sounds wacky? You could have outperformed the market by 20 percent.

According to Bespoke Investment Group, if one had implemented this so-called after hours strategy every day in 2018, it could’ve posted a 13.3 percent return.

“This has really been an intraday bear market, with more than 100 percent of the selling coming during regular trading hours. Since SPY’s peak on Sep. 20, you’d still be up 3.3 percent if you only owned outside of regular trading hours!” said a team of analysts at Bespoke in a note on Monday.

If one had bought the S&P 500 at the open every day and sold at the close, they would’ve lost 20.4 percent.

Intraday selling has been prominent especially in the fourth quarter as big investors rushed out of the market and tax loss selling intensified at the year end. It has been otherwise tough to reap a profit in the stock market this year as the S&P 500 has lost more than 7 percent on trade disputes and slowing economic growth.

However, this trading strategy doesn’t entail any fundamental backing so it is likely impossible to predict whether it would keep working in the new year. In addition, it does not account for trading costs, which could add up with excessive buying and selling every day.

But in theory, it was a rare strategy that worked in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-31  Authors: yun li, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, open, posted, hours, trading, 13, day, regular, 500, market, sp, wacky, selling, daily, rough, return, strategy


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Nervous investors need to decide if ‘going to cash’ is best choice

Nervous investors beware: If you’re seeking some shelter from market volatility, fleeing stocks for cash could put a dent in your long-term savings goals. With that said, worried investors may decide to “go to cash.” A cash investment is basically a short-term obligation, usually about 90 days. Cash investments generally offer a low return compared to other investments. Of course, the market roller coaster ride may have investors thinking of some safe havens.


Nervous investors beware: If you’re seeking some shelter from market volatility, fleeing stocks for cash could put a dent in your long-term savings goals. With that said, worried investors may decide to “go to cash.” A cash investment is basically a short-term obligation, usually about 90 days. Cash investments generally offer a low return compared to other investments. Of course, the market roller coaster ride may have investors thinking of some safe havens.
Nervous investors need to decide if ‘going to cash’ is best choice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: darla mercado, xinhua news agency, getty images, photo, ariel skelley via getty images, peopleimages, -benjamin brandt, cfp, founder of capital city wealth management
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nervous, investment, best, going, need, return, low, market, youre, decide, cash, withof, choice, investors, investments, worried


Nervous investors need to decide if 'going to cash' is best choice

Nervous investors beware: If you’re seeking some shelter from market volatility, fleeing stocks for cash could put a dent in your long-term savings goals.

With that said, worried investors may decide to “go to cash.” So, what exactly does that entail?

A cash investment is basically a short-term obligation, usually about 90 days. It provides a return in the form of interest payments. Cash investments generally offer a low return compared to other investments. They are also associated with very low levels of risk and are often Federal Deposit Insurance Corp-insured.

Financial experts urge investors not to act without a plan. Advisors say you should not change your current investment strategy if it was well thought out to begin with.

Of course, the market roller coaster ride may have investors thinking of some safe havens. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell by more than 400 points Thursday afternoon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-20  Authors: darla mercado, xinhua news agency, getty images, photo, ariel skelley via getty images, peopleimages, -benjamin brandt, cfp, founder of capital city wealth management
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nervous, investment, best, going, need, return, low, market, youre, decide, cash, withof, choice, investors, investments, worried


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Women who attend elite colleges earn more and marry less, new research shows

Attending an elite school like Harvard or Columbia substantially boosts women’s future earnings, but not men’s. The married women were about 19 percent less likely to work outside the home overall. Researchers suspect that the edge women get from attending an elite school reflects different patterns of work and marriage. Setting a higher quality threshold for partners can also explain the decreased likelihood of marrying among women who attend elite colleges,” Isaac said. Is it because men won’t


Attending an elite school like Harvard or Columbia substantially boosts women’s future earnings, but not men’s. The married women were about 19 percent less likely to work outside the home overall. Researchers suspect that the edge women get from attending an elite school reflects different patterns of work and marriage. Setting a higher quality threshold for partners can also explain the decreased likelihood of marrying among women who attend elite colleges,” Isaac said. Is it because men won’t
Women who attend elite colleges earn more and marry less, new research shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: emma newburger, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, attending, study, earn, shows, research, marry, women, elite, colleges, married, selective, school, attend, likely


Women who attend elite colleges earn more and marry less, new research shows

Attending an elite school like Harvard or Columbia substantially boosts women’s future earnings, but not men’s.

Women graduates from elite schools made 14 percent more money than women with comparable entrance-exam scores who attended less selective schools, according to a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research that looked at women entering college in 1976. The study found that men earned roughly the same, regardless of where they went to school.

A woman who graduated from a more selective school was nearly 4 percent less likely to end up married two decades later than a woman who was accepted at a similar school, but chose to attend one where average SAT scores were 100 points lower. That difference in marital status has a huge impact on lifetime earnings potential, too. The married women were about 19 percent less likely to work outside the home overall.

Researchers suspect that the edge women get from attending an elite school reflects different patterns of work and marriage.

“I think the key take-away is that attending an elite college does increase women’s earnings overall, and this happens almost entirely because they become more likely to work and less likely to marry,” Elliot Isaac, a Tulane University professor and an author of the study, told CNBC Make It.

Amalia Miller, a University of Virginia professor and another author of the study, told CNBC Make It that for women, attending a more selective college did not lead to greater skills or productivity. Rather, it “changed their life course, in a direction of investing more in their personal development and labor force participation and less in marriage and time at home.”

Female graduates of elite colleges not only marry later, but are more likely to stay in the workforce after they get married and choose a spouse with a more advanced degree, the study showed.

Researchers suggested that the reason women who attended selective schools are less likely to be married in their late 30’s is because these women are setting a higher bar for their future spouse. They said that when these women do get married, they’re more likely to be married to someone with an advanced degree.

“The marriage effect is more likely to be driven by women setting a higher quality threshold for partners. Setting a higher quality threshold for partners can also explain the decreased likelihood of marrying among women who attend elite colleges,” Isaac said.

This could help explain why top schools continue to attract record numbers of applicants, despite studies showing their unimpressive impact on future earnings.

Other studies have found that there is some cost in the marriage market for successful women. For instance, University of Chicago Booth School of Business economist Marianne Bertrand found that couples were less likely to marry if the woman out earned the man, and they were more prone to break up if she did.

Linda Barrington, the associate dean for outreach and sponsored research in the ILR School at Cornell University, said that these findings are partly because people of similar socioeconomic status tend to marry each other.

“People tend to circulate with people in their own class,” Barrington told CNBC Make It. “You have to look at the difference. Is it because men won’t marry women who earn more than them – an ego concern – or is it that women are choosing to not ‘marry down?'”

The recent analysis was based on a 1996 survey of the graduating class of 1976 and did not account for race or class. However, a 2017 study concluded that low-income students, regardless of gender, benefit from attending more selective schools.

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A new study suggests women earn about half what men earn

A historic number of women were elected in 2018—these four are expected to run for president in 2020


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-17  Authors: emma newburger, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, university, attending, study, earn, shows, research, marry, women, elite, colleges, married, selective, school, attend, likely


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China and India will lead the world’s nuclear power growth, experts say

India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs. According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India. Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated


India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs. According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India. Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated
China and India will lead the world’s nuclear power growth, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: melissa goh, lin shanchuan, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nuclear, power, india, international, production, lead, world, growth, energy, report, china, experts, worlds, say


China and India will lead the world's nuclear power growth, experts say

India and China are set to drive the world’s nuclear power production growth as the two developing nations — among the top consumers of energy in the world — pursue their respective national nuclear energy programs.

According to the International Energy Agency, nuclear power production will grow by about 46 percent by 2040 — and more than 90 percent of the net increase will come from China and India.

Global nuclear electricity output grew 1 percent in 2017, as the world’s nuclear fleet generated 2,503 terawatt-hours (TWh) of electricity, according to the World Nuclear Industry Status Report 2018.

Take China out of the picture, however, and the reality looks starkly different: Global nuclear power generation would have declined for a third consecutive year, the report showed.

Asia, for its part, saw 8 to 9 percent growth in nuclear capacity last year, Agneta Rising, the director general of the World Nuclear Association, told CNBC at the Singapore International Energy Week conference last week.

“(The) largest growth in nuclear energy is in the Asia region, especially in China and India,” she said, adding that nuclear power is “absolutely compatible” and “necessary” for a low carbon future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: melissa goh, lin shanchuan, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nuclear, power, india, international, production, lead, world, growth, energy, report, china, experts, worlds, say


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White House officials push back on the idea that trade deal with China is imminent

For a brief moment Friday, there was optimism in the market that the Trump administration was getting closer to a trade deal with China. Three senior administration officials told CNBC on Friday that there is no indication of an imminent trade deal, despite some progress being made behind the scenes. Later Friday, Trump’s top economic advisor Larry Kudlow told CNBC’s “Halftime Report” that Trump had not asked his Cabinet to put together a draft trade deal. A week ago, Trump told a crowd at the W


For a brief moment Friday, there was optimism in the market that the Trump administration was getting closer to a trade deal with China. Three senior administration officials told CNBC on Friday that there is no indication of an imminent trade deal, despite some progress being made behind the scenes. Later Friday, Trump’s top economic advisor Larry Kudlow told CNBC’s “Halftime Report” that Trump had not asked his Cabinet to put together a draft trade deal. A week ago, Trump told a crowd at the W
White House officials push back on the idea that trade deal with China is imminent Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: tucker higgins, eamon javers, ylan mui, rao aimin, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, idea, push, white, deal, china, trump, trade, administration, house, talks, president, market, told, imminent


White House officials push back on the idea that trade deal with China is imminent

For a brief moment Friday, there was optimism in the market that the Trump administration was getting closer to a trade deal with China. But administration officials are telling CNBC that there is no indication of an imminent agreement.

On Friday, a report that said President Donald Trump had asked U.S. officials to prepare a draft trade agreement with China sent the market higher. Then, after it became clear that the reported progress might not materialize, the Dow went negative.

Three senior administration officials told CNBC on Friday that there is no indication of an imminent trade deal, despite some progress being made behind the scenes. Later Friday, Trump’s top economic advisor Larry Kudlow told CNBC’s “Halftime Report” that Trump had not asked his Cabinet to put together a draft trade deal.

Another senior official said that the president is preparing to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the upcoming G-20 summit in Argentina – and that includes discussing the potential terms of a deal. But that official cautioned against reading too much into the preparations, noting that there is a standing weekly interagency meeting on trade at the White House to discuss specific policies.

Some investors have stressed the need for caution, noting that the administration’s boasts of trade progress are coming just days before the midterm elections. The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

“I think it’s maybe temporary, because Tuesday is Election Day,” said Richard Bernstein, CEO of Richard Bernstein Advisors, Friday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “We will see what happens Wednesday.”

For his part, the president has made a rhetorical turnaround regarding the trade talks. A week ago, Trump told a crowd at the White House that he had a message for Xi.

“They want to make a deal so badly. And I said, ‘You’re not ready yet. No, you’re not ready. No.'” Trump said he told Xi. “I told him, ‘You’re not ready.'” China has blamed the U.S. for escalating trade tensions,

But just a few days before Election Day, the president changed his tune — and it seemed to buoy the stock market right on schedule.

Just a day after Kudlow said that the administration has not engaged the Chinese in “intense talks lately,” Trump said Thursday that trade discussions “are moving along nicely.”

Investors hopeful for a trade deal are skeptical about the recent change in rhetoric, suggesting it could be heavy on politics and short on policy.

“In my opinion, will all due respect to the president, he’s talking up the stock market before the midterm elections,” said Howard Ward, chief investment officer of Gamco Investors.

“There have been no discussions taking place between China and the U.S.,” Ward said. “There will be no deal next month.”

For months, administration officials have said that talks with China were stalling. The president has maintained the country is not ready to come to the table. Just over two weeks ago, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC that talks were on “hiatus.”

Ross also cast doubt on the idea that a deal could be advanced during talks at the G-20 summit this month.

“You can’t do a multi-thousand-page trade agreement in an hour,” he said at the time.

This week is not the first time that the market has risen on reports that the U.S. and China were nearing a deal. A similar situation played out over the summer. Ultimately, those talks came to nothing — with an official telling CNBC that there had been “zero” engagement between the two countries.

The off-and-on nature of the negotiating process has left a sour taste in the mouth of some investors.

“I challenge the White House to bring us a deal which we will then celebrate,” Ward said. “It’s not going to happen.”

The trade gambit comes as Trump has floated a number of other last-minute policy proposals that experts say are unlikely to come to pass, at least on the timeline the president has offered.

Trump said last month that his administration was working on a “resolution” that would cut taxes on the middle class by the midterm elections, despite lawmakers having left Washington. That resolution has yet to materialize.

He has also pledged to sign an executive order doing away with birthright citizenship for children of undocumented immigrants, which experts say would amount to a broad reinterpreting of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution — something that is outside of the president’s executive authority. Trump has said the issue will be resolved by the Supreme Court.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-02  Authors: tucker higgins, eamon javers, ylan mui, rao aimin, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, officials, idea, push, white, deal, china, trump, trade, administration, house, talks, president, market, told, imminent


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Choose these college majors if you want to be financially successful

College seniors’ confidence in their abilities to find jobs this year depends a lot on their majors. A new survey from personal finance website Credit Karma found that graduating seniors who majored in political science and government, engineering or teaching and education are the most confident about their career prospects. In contrast, those who concentrated on arts and performing arts or liberal arts and humanities feel the least secure about their futures, the survey found. Credit Karma’s su


College seniors’ confidence in their abilities to find jobs this year depends a lot on their majors. A new survey from personal finance website Credit Karma found that graduating seniors who majored in political science and government, engineering or teaching and education are the most confident about their career prospects. In contrast, those who concentrated on arts and performing arts or liberal arts and humanities feel the least secure about their futures, the survey found. Credit Karma’s su
Choose these college majors if you want to be financially successful Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: lorie konish, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, choose, teaching, science, successful, arts, website, students, financially, secure, political, college, survey, majors, prospects, seniors


Choose these college majors if you want to be financially successful

College seniors’ confidence in their abilities to find jobs this year depends a lot on their majors.

A new survey from personal finance website Credit Karma found that graduating seniors who majored in political science and government, engineering or teaching and education are the most confident about their career prospects. In contrast, those who concentrated on arts and performing arts or liberal arts and humanities feel the least secure about their futures, the survey found.

Credit Karma’s survey, which was conducted in April, included more than 1,000 parents and students, ages 18 to 72.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: lorie konish, xinhua news agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, choose, teaching, science, successful, arts, website, students, financially, secure, political, college, survey, majors, prospects, seniors


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Here’s why that scholarship might not be free after all

When it comes to financial aid for higher education, even “free” sources of money could leave you owing the IRS. Meanwhile, the average in-state tuition and fees for public four-year colleges is $9,970. But those free sources of financial aid may come with an unexpected price tag in the form of income tax. Generally, a scholarship that covers tuition and fees is tax-free. Here’s when you should be on the lookout for taxes connected to financial aid.


When it comes to financial aid for higher education, even “free” sources of money could leave you owing the IRS. Meanwhile, the average in-state tuition and fees for public four-year colleges is $9,970. But those free sources of financial aid may come with an unexpected price tag in the form of income tax. Generally, a scholarship that covers tuition and fees is tax-free. Here’s when you should be on the lookout for taxes connected to financial aid.
Here’s why that scholarship might not be free after all Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-23  Authors: darla mercado, ariel skelley, getty images, peter cade, hero images, jhu sheridan libraries gado, xinhua news agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, teaching, heres, free, scholarship, tuition, money, fees, aid, financial, sources, school, taxfree


Here’s why that scholarship might not be free after all

When it comes to financial aid for higher education, even “free” sources of money could leave you owing the IRS.

Scholarships, fellowship grants and teaching assistantships are instrumental in helping families pay for college.

Consider that the average tuition and fees for full-time students attending a private four-year college during the 2017-2018 school year is $34,740, according to the College Board. Meanwhile, the average in-state tuition and fees for public four-year colleges is $9,970.

But those free sources of financial aid may come with an unexpected price tag in the form of income tax.

Generally, a scholarship that covers tuition and fees is tax-free. Money that covers room and board is not.

The difference isn’t always clear, however, particularly if stipends and teaching assistantships are involved.

“The problem you run into is when the school says, ‘We’re giving you $10,000 and calling it a scholarship,'” said Tim Steffen, director of advanced planning at Robert W. Baird & Co. in Milwaukee. “Just because the school says it’s tax-free, doesn’t mean it is.”

Here’s when you should be on the lookout for taxes connected to financial aid.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-23  Authors: darla mercado, ariel skelley, getty images, peter cade, hero images, jhu sheridan libraries gado, xinhua news agency
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, teaching, heres, free, scholarship, tuition, money, fees, aid, financial, sources, school, taxfree


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Is Mexico safe? Where to travel now

It’s all left travelers wondering if it is safe to travel to the country. “The vast majority of destinations that tourists and travelers visit are safe,” says Zachary Rabinor, the President and CEO of Journey Mexico, a travel company with three offices in Mexico. Currently, as a country, Mexico’s threat level, according to the State Department, is a level two. The State Department recommends that Americans should not travel to those locations due to “widespread violent crime.” Where to travel no


It’s all left travelers wondering if it is safe to travel to the country. “The vast majority of destinations that tourists and travelers visit are safe,” says Zachary Rabinor, the President and CEO of Journey Mexico, a travel company with three offices in Mexico. Currently, as a country, Mexico’s threat level, according to the State Department, is a level two. The State Department recommends that Americans should not travel to those locations due to “widespread violent crime.” Where to travel no
Is Mexico safe? Where to travel now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-16  Authors: jo piazza, special to cnbc, getty images, xinhua news agency, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, department, state, security, safe, tourists, unsafe, playa, level, travel


Is Mexico safe? Where to travel now

Mexico is a popular vacation destination with more than 40 million tourists visiting in 2017. But in the past year, various parts of the country have been besieged by gang violence, assaults, natural disasters and even reports of poisoned liquor.

On March 8, ahead of spring break season, the U.S. State Department issued a security alert for the popular resort spot Playa del Carmen after the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City received a security threat against the town.

The alert, which was later downgraded to include on five neighborhoods, came less than a month after an explosion on a tourist ferry in Playa del Carmen injured 24 people, including five Americans. And in December the U.S. Office of Inspector General opened an inquiry to investigate possibly tainted booze at all-inclusive resorts in Mexican resort towns like Playa Del Carmen and Cancun.

It’s all left travelers wondering if it is safe to travel to the country.

Experts say yes.

“The vast majority of destinations that tourists and travelers visit are safe,” says Zachary Rabinor, the President and CEO of Journey Mexico, a travel company with three offices in Mexico. “Like in the rest of the world, unsafe areas have more to do with local petty crime or if visitors engage in unsafe activities or visit unsafe establishments.”

Currently, as a country, Mexico’s threat level, according to the State Department, is a level two. That means tourists should “be aware of heightened risks to safety and security.” For context, the Bahamas are also rated a level two (due to crime like burglaries and robberies).

Five states in Mexico have a level four rating — Colima, Guerrero (where Acapulco is located), Michoacan, Sinaloa (where Mazatlan is located) and Tamaulipas (part of which borders Texas) — the same ranking as war zones like Afghanistan and Iraq. The State Department recommends that Americans should not travel to those locations due to “widespread violent crime.”

But as long as you’re not traveling to one of these areas, “there is no reason to do more than to be aware of the warnings and to exercise the normal degree of caution that should be done while traveling anywhere,” says Christopher Wilson, the deputy director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center.

“Don’t drink the tap water, have a cab called for you instead of flagging one down on the street,” recommends Wilson.

Additionally, leave a detailed itinerary with family and friends that includes contact information for hotels and guides, says Rabinor. Also avoid wearing flashy or expensive jewelry that would make you stand out among a crowd.

Where to travel now

There are some great, safe places to go, say the experts.

La Paz, on the eastern side of Baja California Sur on the Sea of Cortez, is quickly becoming a well-known beach vacation destination, particularly for those fond of snorkeling and diving. Tour operators offer whale watching excursions, swimming with whale sharks (the largest fish in the world) or day trips to Isla Espíritu Santo where visitors can swim with the sea lions, snorkel over coral reefs and dive in artificial reefs made growing out of two sunken ships.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-16  Authors: jo piazza, special to cnbc, getty images, xinhua news agency, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mexico, department, state, security, safe, tourists, unsafe, playa, level, travel


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Borrowers on $1.4 trillion student debt may benefit from new Fidelity program

For recent graduates, their student loan debt may very well shape their choice job, career path and employer. Over the last decade, college-loan balances in the United States have jumped to an all-time high of $1.4 trillion, according to a recent report by Experian. Now, more employers are betting that student loan repayment programs will attract young, top talent burdened by all that debt. To that end, Fidelity Investments announced Thursday it is introducing a Student Debt Employer Contributio


For recent graduates, their student loan debt may very well shape their choice job, career path and employer. Over the last decade, college-loan balances in the United States have jumped to an all-time high of $1.4 trillion, according to a recent report by Experian. Now, more employers are betting that student loan repayment programs will attract young, top talent burdened by all that debt. To that end, Fidelity Investments announced Thursday it is introducing a Student Debt Employer Contributio
Borrowers on $1.4 trillion student debt may benefit from new Fidelity program Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-14  Authors: jessica dickler, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, source, drew university, hero images, xinhua news agency, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, recent, benefit, loan, young, employers, 14, student, yearsnow, trillion, united, borrowers, program, debt, fidelity


Borrowers on $1.4 trillion student debt may benefit from new Fidelity program

For recent graduates, their student loan debt may very well shape their choice job, career path and employer.

Over the last decade, college-loan balances in the United States have jumped to an all-time high of $1.4 trillion, according to a recent report by Experian. The average outstanding balance is $34,144, up 62 percent over the last 10 years.

Now, more employers are betting that student loan repayment programs will attract young, top talent burdened by all that debt.

To that end, Fidelity Investments announced Thursday it is introducing a Student Debt Employer Contribution program, which will let employers make after-tax contributions toward participants’ loans. The program, aimed at lessening the burden of student loan debt and increasing recruitment and retention, will begin later this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-14  Authors: jessica dickler, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, source, drew university, hero images, xinhua news agency, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, recent, benefit, loan, young, employers, 14, student, yearsnow, trillion, united, borrowers, program, debt, fidelity


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Drew University is slashing tuition by 20 percent

When it comes to college, rising costs are a seemingly unstoppable force. However, some schools are bucking the trend, slashing tuition in hopes of attracting more students and families struggling with the weight of a college tab. Most recently, Drew University, a New Jersey-based private college, announced it is lowering the price of its tuition by 20 percent, to $38,668 for 2018-2019 from $48,336 for 2017-2018. “We have to have our finger on the pulse of how students are making choices,” Drew


When it comes to college, rising costs are a seemingly unstoppable force. However, some schools are bucking the trend, slashing tuition in hopes of attracting more students and families struggling with the weight of a college tab. Most recently, Drew University, a New Jersey-based private college, announced it is lowering the price of its tuition by 20 percent, to $38,668 for 2018-2019 from $48,336 for 2017-2018. “We have to have our finger on the pulse of how students are making choices,” Drew
Drew University is slashing tuition by 20 percent Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-13  Authors: jessica dickler, source, drew university, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, hero images, xinhua news agency, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, drew, costs, making, private, college, students, price, university, families, tuition, slashing, schools, 20


Drew University is slashing tuition by 20 percent

When it comes to college, rising costs are a seemingly unstoppable force.

However, some schools are bucking the trend, slashing tuition in hopes of attracting more students and families struggling with the weight of a college tab.

Most recently, Drew University, a New Jersey-based private college, announced it is lowering the price of its tuition by 20 percent, to $38,668 for 2018-2019 from $48,336 for 2017-2018.

“We have to have our finger on the pulse of how students are making choices,” Drew President MaryAnn Baenninger said. “A lot of families will search based on published price, and if they are looking for private liberal arts colleges under $40,000, we don’t show up.”

In addition, even though college enrollment is on the rise, competition among schools for the top students is fierce. Schools like Drew are making a bet that the reduced costs will attract more student applicants, raising the overall bar for the school.

“Our goal now is to increase applications and accept students at the same rate,” Baenninger said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-09-13  Authors: jessica dickler, source, drew university, michael nagle, bloomberg, getty images, hero images, xinhua news agency, pedro castellano
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, drew, costs, making, private, college, students, price, university, families, tuition, slashing, schools, 20


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