The cost of college increased by more than 25% in the last 10 years—here’s why

Cuts to higher education fundingLackluster state funding is a major reason for rising college costs. The CBPP report analyzes state funding for higher education and published in-state public college costs from the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year. “Nearly every state has shifted the responsibility of funding higher education from the state to students over the last 25 years, with the most drastic shift occurring in the past decade.” Mitchell said college costs can rise even in states tha


Cuts to higher education fundingLackluster state funding is a major reason for rising college costs.
The CBPP report analyzes state funding for higher education and published in-state public college costs from the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year.
“Nearly every state has shifted the responsibility of funding higher education from the state to students over the last 25 years, with the most drastic shift occurring in the past decade.”
Mitchell said college costs can rise even in states tha
The cost of college increased by more than 25% in the last 10 years—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearsheres, college, increased, funding, tuition, education, state, cost, higher, costs, states, public


The cost of college increased by more than 25% in the last 10 years—here's why

Cuts to higher education funding

Lackluster state funding is a major reason for rising college costs. From 2008 to 2018, the average tuition at four-year public colleges increased in all 50 states. On average, tuition at these schools has increased by 37%, and net costs (including factors like scholarships and grants) have increased by 24%, according to a 2019 report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The CBPP report analyzes state funding for higher education and published in-state public college costs from the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year. Researchers Michael Mitchell, Michael Leachman and Matt Saenz found that funding for higher education has not rebounded to pre-recession levels in most states, and that college costs are rising as a result. From the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year, 41 states spent less per student, after adjusting for inflation. During that time period, states spent an average of 13% less per student — about $1,220. “It really does start to beg the question of what constitutes public higher education,” Michael Mitchell, lead author of the report and senior director and counselor of Equity and Inclusion at the CBPP told CNBC Make It. “Nearly every state has shifted the responsibility of funding higher education from the state to students over the last 25 years, with the most drastic shift occurring in the past decade.” Several of the states with the biggest drops in per-student spending have seen significant tuition increases. In Louisiana, for instance, published tuition at public four-year colleges and universities has doubled since the 2008 school year. In Alabama and Arizona, tuition at public colleges and universities is up by more than 60%. Per-student funding for higher education has increased in nine states since the Great Recession — New York, Montana, California, Alaska, Wisconsin, Hawaii, Wyoming, North Dakota and Illinois — but average tuition at public universities has still increased in all 50 states. Mitchell said college costs can rise even in states that increase funding because there are other factors that influence college finances, including cost of living.

Cost of living

″[State funding] is a factor — a relatively sizable factor — but other things also play a role,” said Mitchell. “Health-care cost, retirement costs for faculty and staff, infrastructure, things like that. While state spending is one variable, it exists in a broader range of calculations.” One of those variables is cost of living. In the United States, cost of living has steadily increased over the past several years. College students are not immune to the impact of this increase, since many American students choose to move away from home and live on campus or near campus. Increased cost of living also impacts how much colleges spend on employees. For instance, health-care costs increased significantly this decade, including those costs paid by employers.

Other expenses


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yearsheres, college, increased, funding, tuition, education, state, cost, higher, costs, states, public


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tuition at public colleges has increased in all 50 states over the past 10 years—here’s how your state compares

Today, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in American colleges, and they are paying some of the highest costs in history — even at public colleges and universities. From 2008 to 2018, the average tuition at four-year public colleges increased in all 50 states. In Alabama and Arizona, tuition at public colleges and universities is up by more than 60%. “[State funding] is a factor — a relatively sizable factor — but other things also play a role,” he told CNBC Make It. Here’s how the tuition


Today, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in American colleges, and they are paying some of the highest costs in history — even at public colleges and universities.
From 2008 to 2018, the average tuition at four-year public colleges increased in all 50 states.
In Alabama and Arizona, tuition at public colleges and universities is up by more than 60%.
“[State funding] is a factor — a relatively sizable factor — but other things also play a role,” he told CNBC Make It.
Here’s how the tuition
Tuition at public colleges has increased in all 50 states over the past 10 years—here’s how your state compares Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, yearsheres, compares, tuition, colleges, increased, costs, state, school, education, states, funding, higher, past


Tuition at public colleges has increased in all 50 states over the past 10 years—here's how your state compares

Arizona State University graduate students are seen in their seats during their graduation ceremony. May 13, 2009, in Tempe, Arizona. Over 65,000 people attended the graduation.

Today, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in American colleges, and they are paying some of the highest costs in history — even at public colleges and universities. From 2008 to 2018, the average tuition at four-year public colleges increased in all 50 states. On average, tuition at these schools has increased by 37%, and net costs have increased by 24%. According to a report released Thursday from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, lackluster state funding is a major reason for rising costs. The CBPP report analyzes state funding for higher education and published in-state public college costs from the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year. Researchers Michael Mitchell, Michael Leachman and Matt Saenz found that funding for higher education has not rebounded to pre-recession levels in most states, and that college costs are rising as a result. From the 2008 school year to the 2018 school year, 41 states spent less per student, after adjusting for inflation. During that time period, states spent an average of 13% less per student — about $1,220.

Here’s how higher education funding per student has changed in each state since 2008:

The CBPP report says limited state funding has contributed to rising college costs, citing figures from the College Board which estimate that annual published tuition at four-year public colleges has risen by $2,708, about 37%, since the 2008 school year. “It really does start to beg the question of what constitutes public higher education,” Michael Mitchell, lead author of the report and Senior Director and Counselor of Equity and Inclusion at the CBPP told reporters on Wednesday. “Nearly every state has shifted the responsibility of funding higher education from the state to students over the last 25 years, with the most drastic shift occurring in the past decade.” Several of the states with the biggest drops in per-student spending have seen significant tuition increases. In Louisiana, for instance, published tuition at public four-year colleges and universities has doubled since the 2008 school year. In Alabama and Arizona, tuition at public colleges and universities is up by more than 60%. Per-student funding for higher education has increased in nine states since the Great Recession — New York, Montana, California, Alaska, Wisconsin, Hawaii, Wyoming, North Dakota and Illinois — but average tuition at public universities has still increased in all 50 states. Mitchell said college costs can rise even in states that increase funding because there are other factors that influence college finances. “[State funding] is a factor — a relatively sizable factor — but other things also play a role,” he told CNBC Make It. “Health-care cost, retirement costs for faculty and staff, infrastructure, things like that. While state spending is one variable, it exists in a broader range of calculations.”

Here’s how the tuition at public colleges and universities has changed in each state since 2008:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, yearsheres, compares, tuition, colleges, increased, costs, state, school, education, states, funding, higher, past


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

I’ve written about money for over 5 years—here’s how I’m getting my own finances in order before 2020

This strategy might work for you, too — after five-plus years of writing about money, I’ve learned a lot about what actually helps people get their finances in order. I have a head start on this because I’ve tracked my spending, savings and investments for the past six months. In past review sessions, I’ve learned that I could save a lot of money by being more proactive. That gives me more peace of mind if my liquid savings goal is falling short, as it has been this year. This goal is less quant


This strategy might work for you, too — after five-plus years of writing about money, I’ve learned a lot about what actually helps people get their finances in order.
I have a head start on this because I’ve tracked my spending, savings and investments for the past six months.
In past review sessions, I’ve learned that I could save a lot of money by being more proactive.
That gives me more peace of mind if my liquid savings goal is falling short, as it has been this year.
This goal is less quant
I’ve written about money for over 5 years—here’s how I’m getting my own finances in order before 2020 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, need, yearsheres, 2020, written, spending, ive, order, getting, past, goal, roth, savings, money, finances


I've written about money for over 5 years—here's how I'm getting my own finances in order before 2020

How are you preparing your finances for 2020? Email reporter Alicia Adamczyk at alicia.adamczyk@nbcuni.com for a chance to be featured on CNBC Make it. With less than three months left before the start of a new year and a new decade, I’ve been thinking more and more about where my finances stand currently, and where I’d like them to be. Over the past year, I’ve made strides to strengthen my financial foundation: I’ve reviewed all of my investments, increased my savings and feel, generally, comfortable with where my money is going. But at the same time, I’m still wasting money on frivolous expenses, especially food and convenience items, and it can be frustrating to see how “little” I have stashed away compared to what I think I should have at this point in my career. I’m on the fence about New Year’s resolutions: Research shows that people rarely accomplish the goals they set at the beginning of the year. What is the point of making a big deal out of what is, ultimately, an arbitrary time of year? Still, I love setting goals and think that they are personally beneficial, especially for something as important as your money. And to accomplish them, you need a simple, actionable plan. For me, that means sitting down with a pen and paper and thinking through what I actually want to achieve in the next 12 months and how I can get there. And I’m not waiting until January to start planning. This strategy might work for you, too — after five-plus years of writing about money, I’ve learned a lot about what actually helps people get their finances in order. Here are four steps I’m taking to do that in 2020.

1. Review what I spent in 2019

To figure out where I want to go in 2020, I need to see where I’ve been. To do this, I am scheduling a Personal Inventory Day (PID) with myself. A PID is a concept I first came across while listening to the podcast “Call Your Girlfriend.” Guest Sabrina Hersi Issa, a human rights technologist, explains that once a month, on the same date (say, the 20th), she tackles all of the life admin tasks she needs to accomplish, based off of a to-do list she keeps throughout the previous few weeks. That could be taking shoes to the cobbler, negotiating a cable bill, finally going in for that teeth cleaning — you get the picture. There are a few money-related tasks I have planned for my PID, but the main one is reviewing my spending from the past year. That means pulling up all of my credit card and bank statements for 2019 and asking myself the following: How much did I spend each month on necessities, how much on wants, etc.?

Of those expenditures, what would I consider money wasted?

Where are obvious places I’m over-spending?

What are the things I don’t remember buying?

What does my savings look like in relation to my spending? I have a head start on this because I’ve tracked my spending, savings and investments for the past six months. Still, a deeper analysis is needed. If I want to get serious about my goals, like significantly scaling back food spending, then I need to have all of the information on where my money is going. And though I’ve been tracking my expenses, I haven’t taken the additional time to really analyze my spending patterns and set concrete budget figures.

Another thing I’d like to work on is planning ahead. In past review sessions, I’ve learned that I could save a lot of money by being more proactive. That applies to “easy” changes, like planning meals and lunches, and buying toiletries on sale before I run out. But it also means looking further into the future and thinking about potential vacations, major events I’m attending or classes I want to take. In some ways this is the most basic task on the list, but it’s also the most important. Facing habits head-on is the key to changing them. And it’s always good to take time to see if your spending accurately reflects the kind of person you want to be and the life you want to live. Turning off auto-pilot and taking the controls back can be extremely empowering.

2. Set clear, but flexible goals

I’m a big believer in flexible goal setting. I like having an idea of what I want to accomplish and in what time frame, without being too hard on myself if I fall short. A year is long enough to make noticeable progress toward — or complete — many goals. In 2019, my goal has been to save as much money as possible by automating Roth IRA contributions, bringing my lunch to work and not buying new clothes, among other things. I saved around $1,000 more this year than I have in the past, but it’s not enough that I would consider this goal accomplished. So I will be rolling it over to next year. See: flexible goal setting!

In 2020, I’m going to tweak my strategy to focus on maxing out my Roth IRA. I like a Roth account because the money grows tax-free, and I can use it as back-up emergency savings if I absolutely need to. That gives me more peace of mind if my liquid savings goal is falling short, as it has been this year. And if I keep it invested, I can benefit from years and years of compounded growth. To get there, I’m planning to automatically invest $500 per month into my Roth IRA. While that can be difficult in New York City on a journalist’s salary, there are plenty of categories where I can save more than I am right now — food and dining out being the biggest. Plus, this is probably the best position I’ll ever be in to save, since I don’t have major financial responsibilities, like kids or a mortgage, and I have a relatively stable job. I’m mindful of these privileges, and I don’t want to squander them. I’d also like to increase my eco-consciousness and improve my consumption habits. As I wrote in an article about my no-spend summer, practicing sustainable habits, such as eliminating food waste and reliance on plastic packaging, isn’t just money-friendly, it also feels like a moral imperative for me, so I’d like to buy fewer things in 2020. This goal is less quantifiable than my Roth goal, but I plan to see if I’m succeeding by comparing my expenses each month to the previous year’s.

3. Get inspired

A few years ago, I was feeling profoundly uninspired with my finances. I wanted to save more and cut back my spending, but I just wasn’t getting what I needed out of my traditional sources for money advice and information. Everything I came across felt a bit dry and stuffy; if I read “make coffee at home” one more time I was going to throw my laptop through a window. I was craving more first-hand accounts from non-experts who were finding realistic strategies that worked in their day-to-day lives. That’s when I dove headfirst into money-related and anti-consumerism subreddits — I love r/Declutter, r/MoneyDiariesACTIVE and r/nobuy — and private personal finance Facebook groups. These communities are filled with questions, tips and resources, and there are countless others out there that offer support and guidance. Lately, r/MakeupRehab, billed as a “support group” for users who want to cut their makeup and skincare spending, has been my go-to for no-spend inspiration. I don’t have a problem with my makeup spending specifically, but the conversations happening on the sub’s threads are applicable to any range of shopping habits, and almost every commenter is supportive and positive.

These niche communities are especially helpful because everyone is there because they want to be. They are all-in on the mission of the group, which isn’t the case in a lot of comment threads or on other social media sites

These niche communities are especially helpful because everyone is there because they want to be. They are all-in on the mission of the group, which isn’t the case in a lot of comment threads or on other social media sites, such as Twitter. That makes the conversation much more valuable and affirming. For inspiration beyond Reddit, I also keep coming back to one bit of advice Dana Marineau, VP and financial advocate at Credit Karma, gave me back in July: If I want to buy something, I should ask myself if I could afford to buy it twice with the money I have now. If I can’t, then I need to rethink things.

4. Write everything down


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, save, need, yearsheres, 2020, written, spending, ive, order, getting, past, goal, roth, savings, money, finances


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Tesla is having its best day in 6 years—here’s what Cramer and other experts are saying

Experts are split, but some, including Jim Cramer, liked what they saw in the results that ignited the move. Here’s what they’re saying:Jim Cramer, host of CNBC’s “Mad Money,” said the conference call felt like it was that of a more traditional automaker:”I’ve got to tell you: Ford sounded like Tesla, and Tesla sounded like Ford. This was – I’m not saying it was subdued [CEO] Elon [Musk], but it was a guy who makes cars. That’s one of the reasons why the stock’s [up] so much, because he wasn’t o


Experts are split, but some, including Jim Cramer, liked what they saw in the results that ignited the move.
Here’s what they’re saying:Jim Cramer, host of CNBC’s “Mad Money,” said the conference call felt like it was that of a more traditional automaker:”I’ve got to tell you: Ford sounded like Tesla, and Tesla sounded like Ford.
This was – I’m not saying it was subdued [CEO] Elon [Musk], but it was a guy who makes cars.
That’s one of the reasons why the stock’s [up] so much, because he wasn’t o
Tesla is having its best day in 6 years—here’s what Cramer and other experts are saying Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, quarter, yearsheres, having, best, day, model, million, think, earnings, revenue, look, saying, going, cramer, experts


Tesla is having its best day in 6 years—here's what Cramer and other experts are saying

Has Tesla turned?

That was the big question on Wall Street on Thursday as shares of the technology-forward automaker had their best day since 2013 following the company’s third-quarter earnings release.

Experts are split, but some, including Jim Cramer, liked what they saw in the results that ignited the move.

Here’s what they’re saying:

Jim Cramer, host of CNBC’s “Mad Money,” said the conference call felt like it was that of a more traditional automaker:

“I’ve got to tell you: Ford sounded like Tesla, and Tesla sounded like Ford. Tesla was like listening to a call from a real company that made cars and made money. … It was seamless. How about China? The fastest to grow, to put up a factory and hire people. This was – I’m not saying it was subdued [CEO] Elon [Musk], but it was a guy who makes cars. I enjoy this kind of not-wise-guy Elon. … Now, people hate this. … You say something good about Tesla and people say, ‘Hey, you said it was bad. You said something bad about Tesla and now you’ve got me caught in a short.’ Look, the fact is that Tesla delivered a profit, but there are a lot of people who think it was still hocus pocus. I come back and say I look at that cash position, and I say you know what? … It was just a regular call. That’s one of the reasons why the stock’s [up] so much, because he wasn’t on Twitter saying, ‘This was the greatest quarter ever and I’m going to make 500,000 cars.’ There was none of that. There wasn’t. And the China thing? Look, it turns out that – by the way, like [PayPal CEO] Dan Schulman – if you work with the Chinese government, you can still do a tremendous amount of business.”

Craig Irwin, senior research analyst at Roth Capital Partners, wasn’t quite as bullish on Tesla’s prospects:

“So, what I’m looking at is revenue is down [$]520 million year over year. Why is that? We have 10,000 fewer Model S and X cars this year versus last year. Pricing on the Model 3 is actually off about 20% year over year, and it looks like quicksand to me. So, we have to look at 2020 and ask: Are we going to see further deceleration? Are we going to see further probable price pressure on the Model 3? I think so. I think it’s overdone at [$]300. [Host: And the Model Y isn’t going to come save the story?] I’m a skeptic. I think it probably does end up cannibalizing the three in a very similar way to when we saw the X come in with the S.”

Gene Munster, co-founder of Loup Ventures, said the report will refocus investors on the bull case for Tesla:

“This was a great quarter for them, and I reluctantly use the word ‘great’ because I think it’s such an emotional stock one way or the other and I don’t want to pick sides here. I want to stay straight and narrow down the road. And specifically what happened – and, in hindsight, they kind of told us that this would happen in their June letter, that they’d been recognizing some revenue from the deferred component. That is probably the biggest missing piece between that revenue fractional miss and the strong earnings, is that they have, call it, $880 million in deferred revenue. Last quarter, they said there was [$]567 million that would be recognized over the next year, but … the incremental piece that we learned from the letter that they just put out was that they still have nearly [$]500 million to recognize going forward. And so, what that probably means is a portion of this upside in earnings — maybe consider it a third or a half of it — was related to deferred, essentially 100% margin revenue that came from this full self-driving feature that they’ve been selling. So, the reason why that is an important factor in this, as we think about this quarter relative to the Tesla story, is that the deliveries have been moving in the right direction. I’m surprised that their guidance will call for … a record number [of vehicles] in the December quarter, but the earnings piece their ability to shave off this deferred income, makes it more easy for the company to essentially improve that earnings piece, which obviously has been one of the negatives around this story. And they can sustain that, that [$]570 million. They could take pieces of that over the next two years. And so, this whole idea that … we’re one quarter away from things kind of collapsing, I think that story took a step back and the overall story took a step forward today.”

Cathie Wood, a noted Tesla bull and the CEO of Ark Invest, which has a $4,000 long-term price target on the stock, said the short sellers were likely “covering” as the stock surged over 17%:

“I think … some of the shorts are covering. They’re stretching to make a negative case now. They’re trying to figure out, is there some accounting gimmickry here that has caused this upside surprise? And as we dig through the accounting and the numbers generally, if you look at the revenue growth year to date, 21%. Unit growth up 65% in an auto industry that is declining. We think total auto sales have peaked. So, this is quite dramatic, and I think the shorts are going to be forced to cover as time goes on.”

New Street Research analyst Pierre Ferragu said the positive results were a reflection of Tesla’s leadership in the auto space:

“I think nobody’s close, to be honest. Tesla introduced into the market the Model S seven years ago, and today, in what manufacturers have on the road or have announced, nothing is matching the 2012 Tesla Model S. And the Model S of Tesla today is actually 40% better than seven years ago. So, that’s how Tesla turned from being a disruptive innovator seven years ago to, actually, an industry leader. They have seven years of experience others don’t have, and I don’t think anyone is close to that.”

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: lizzy gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tesla, quarter, yearsheres, having, best, day, model, million, think, earnings, revenue, look, saying, going, cramer, experts


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals

Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav


Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav
Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


Flights to Europe are cheaper than they've been in years—here's where to go to get the best deals

Dreaming of strolling along the wide avenues in Paris or eating pastas in Rome? Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality.

That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper.

Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August.

Traveling in late spring will not only save you money on flights, but on lodging and other travel costs as well. In fact, May is the best time of year to go if you want to spend less on your trip than you would during the summer high season, Liana Corwin, Hopper’s consumer travel expert, tells CNBC Make It.

“Early May is still considered ‘low season’ in many destinations, which means you’ll also be able to scoop up hotel rooms and attractions at a fraction of the high season cost through most of the spring,” Corwin says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

34-year-old self-made millionaire: If you make $70,000, you could retire in 10 years—here’s how

Sabatier set a goal for himself on the spot: Earn $1 million and retire as early as possible. He began doing anything he could to make money, from flipping domain names to buying and selling Volkswagen campers. “I think a vast majority of Americans can retire in 10 years or less if they’re making at least $70,000 per year,” he says. “Go out and just try to make a little extra money,” Sabatier says. But every $1,000 you make and invest instead, that’s going to cut literal months off the time that


Sabatier set a goal for himself on the spot: Earn $1 million and retire as early as possible.
He began doing anything he could to make money, from flipping domain names to buying and selling Volkswagen campers.
“I think a vast majority of Americans can retire in 10 years or less if they’re making at least $70,000 per year,” he says.
“Go out and just try to make a little extra money,” Sabatier says.
But every $1,000 you make and invest instead, that’s going to cut literal months off the time that
34-year-old self-made millionaire: If you make $70,000, you could retire in 10 years—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, youre, 70000, months, 34yearold, sabatier, save, yearsheres, cut, income, retire, live, selfmade, millionaire, little


34-year-old self-made millionaire: If you make $70,000, you could retire in 10 years—here's how

In 2010, 24-year-old Grant Sabatier had just moved back in with his parents after bouncing from job to job and then getting laid off in the midst of the recession. With less than $5 to his name and only three months to find his own place, Sabatier knew he needed to get his finances back on track. His wake-up call came on the morning of August 24th when he wanted a Chipotle burrito for lunch. “I only had $2.26 in my bank account — not even enough to buy a side of guacamole,” says the Millennial Money founder and author of “Financial Freedom: A Proven Path to All the Money You Will Ever Need.” Sabatier set a goal for himself on the spot: Earn $1 million and retire as early as possible. He began doing anything he could to make money, from flipping domain names to buying and selling Volkswagen campers. “I had 13 different income streams at one point,” he says. Sabatier boosted his income to more than $300,000 per year. He also managed to save around 80 percent of what he brought in, which he invested in the market. Only five years, three months and six days later, Sabatier reached his goal with more than $1.2 million saved. That was in 2015.

The important thing here is to realize that saving is not a sacrifice. It’s an opportunity. Grant Sabatier author of ‘Financial Freedom: A Proven Path to All the Money You Will Ever Need’

Although his story sounds extreme, Sabatier, now 34, believes nearly anyone who earns more than a certain amount can follow in his footsteps. “I think a vast majority of Americans can retire in 10 years or less if they’re making at least $70,000 per year,” he says. To make that happen, you have to be willing and able to consistently save 50 to 70 percent of your income, he says, and that may require a major overhaul of your lifestyle. But you don’t have to make yourself miserable. It all comes down to your attitude going into the situation, he says: “The important thing here is to realize that saving is not a sacrifice. It’s an opportunity.” “You’re going to have to live a little bit differently than most people,” he adds. “You might be thinking, ‘How can I live on $30,000 or $35,000 per year?’ But you can live actually pretty well on $30,000 or $35,000 per year.”

Sabatier emphasizes that making short term sacrifices now allow you the freedom of financial independence later. “You’re probably thinking, ‘Oh, I’d have to get a really crappy apartment or drive a really crappy car.’ And the answer is: You might actually have to do that for a little while,” he says.

Self-made millionaire Grant Sabatier

“But we’re not talking about doing that forever. We’re talking about doing that just for a couple of years in order to bank and save and invest the difference.” If you’re interested in retiring in 10 years, Sabatier offers three tips to make it happen.

1. Cut your housing expenses

What’s your biggest monthly expense? For many people, it’s your rent or mortgage. Sabatier recommends trying to decrease that number by as much as you can because it’s a simple way to make a big impact on your savings. “Live in the least expensive apartment that you can, get roommates, house hack, buy a two-bedroom apartment and rent out the other room to keep your housing expenses as low as possible,” he says. “If you can cut your housing expense from $2,000 down to $600 or $700, all of the sudden, you’ve 10 or 15 years off the time that it will take you to retire.”

2. Start a side hustle

You can only cut your expenses so much. But the amount you’re able to earn is limitless. “Go out and just try to make a little extra money,” Sabatier says. “You don’t have to go crazy, you don’t have to go out and make an extra $10,000 or more per month. But every $1,000 you make and invest instead, that’s going to cut literal months off the time that it will take you to retire.” He notes that it’s also important to invest your extra income. By putting your cash to work, those earnings are able to grow, rather than sit in a regular savings account, where it can actually lose value in the long term.

3. Stick with it


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: emmie martin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, youre, 70000, months, 34yearold, sabatier, save, yearsheres, cut, income, retire, live, selfmade, millionaire, little


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him

A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo


A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo
An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winter, worth, learned, restaurants, omaha, piccolos, buffett, served, restaurant, important, 2005, steakhouse, waitress, yearsheres, warren


An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here's what she learned from him

For the 81 years Piccolo Pete’s Italian steakhouse was open in Omaha, Nebraska, it was a neighborhood restaurant where families came to eat heaps of pasta with red sauce and 16-oz. T-bone steaks, served by a staff of locals. Above the tables in the wood-paneled dining room, a sparkly crystal ball hung as a relic from the restaurant’s days of hosting ballroom dancing with dinner.

Then, in 2005, something quite exciting happened at the family-run eatery: A billionaire came to dinner.

A very important customer

Warren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. That winter, he decided to have his company Christmas luncheon at the restaurant.

Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. “I can’t lie, I was a little bit nervous,” she tells CNBC Make It. She kept telling herself “He’s just a human.”

Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. His financial conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway has a market cap of more than $472 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to woo as a diner.

Buffett’s event was a big deal for the restaurant (in addition to the obvious reasons) because back then he was known to be a loyal diner at rival Omaha steakhouse Gorat’s, Augustine explains. Now, he was coming to Piccolo’s, and the owners had high hopes he’d become a regular.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winter, worth, learned, restaurants, omaha, piccolos, buffett, served, restaurant, important, 2005, steakhouse, waitress, yearsheres, warren


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him

A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo


A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo
An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steakhouse, waitress, important, yearsheres, 2005, learned, worth, buffett, served, restaurants, winter, piccolos, restaurant, warren, omaha


An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here's what she learned from him

For the 81 years Piccolo Pete’s Italian steakhouse was open in Omaha, Nebraska, it was a neighborhood restaurant where families came to eat heaps of pasta with red sauce and 16-oz. T-bone steaks, served by a staff of locals. Above the tables in the wood-paneled dining room, a sparkly crystal ball hung as a relic from the restaurant’s days of hosting ballroom dancing with dinner.

Then, in 2005, something quite exciting happened at the family-run eatery: A billionaire came to dinner.

A very important customer

Warren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. That winter, he decided to have his company Christmas luncheon at the restaurant.

Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. “I can’t lie, I was a little bit nervous,” she tells CNBC Make It. She kept telling herself “He’s just a human.”

Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. His financial conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway has a market cap of more than $472 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to woo as a diner.

Buffett’s event was a big deal for the restaurant (in addition to the obvious reasons) because back then he was known to be a loyal diner at rival Omaha steakhouse Gorat’s, Augustine explains. Now, he was coming to Piccolo’s, and the owners had high hopes he’d become a regular.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steakhouse, waitress, important, yearsheres, 2005, learned, worth, buffett, served, restaurants, winter, piccolos, restaurant, warren, omaha


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here’s how to know

Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing. More from the Financial Samurai:The average net worth for the above average personRanking the best passive income investments in order to never work againFinancial dependence is the wo


Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing. More from the Financial Samurai:The average net worth for the above average personRanking the best passive income investments in order to never work againFinancial dependence is the wo
You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here’s how to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: sam dogen, financial samurai, eclipse sportswire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contribution, average, trend, little, know, 401k, 18, worst, unrelenting, work, yearsheres, millionaire, maximum, worth, limit


You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here's how to know

Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing.

More from the Financial Samurai:

The average net worth for the above average person

Ranking the best passive income investments in order to never work again

Financial dependence is the worst: Why each spouse needs their own bank account

Make no doubt about it, being a 401(k) millionaire is very impressive given the maximum contribution limit has never been higher than 2018’s contribution limit of $18,500. When I was first able to contribute to a 401(k) in 1999, the maximum contribution limit was only $10,000.

Check out the chart below for details.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: sam dogen, financial samurai, eclipse sportswire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contribution, average, trend, little, know, 401k, 18, worst, unrelenting, work, yearsheres, millionaire, maximum, worth, limit


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here’s why

There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. “I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”


There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. “I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”
This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: robert frank, source, noble black, douglas elliman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, asked, price, whos, weve, way, sell, 40, wants, went, think, mansion, black, yearsheres


This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here's why

There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. But all of them fell through for various reasons.

To learn more about why some spec mansions often sit empty for years, and why more and more asking prices at the top seem like pure fantasy, “Secret Lives of the Super Rich” toured the home with its current broker, Noble Black. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent.

“They were trying to find the market,” Black told me. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. We’ve come in and right-priced it.”

I asked him how Kurtz feels about the home.

“I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. “He literally poured his heart and soul into it. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: robert frank, source, noble black, douglas elliman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, asked, price, whos, weve, way, sell, 40, wants, went, think, mansion, black, yearsheres


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post