Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals

Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav


Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality. That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper. Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August. Traveling in late spring will not only sav
Flights to Europe are cheaper than they’ve been in years—here’s where to go to get the best deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


Flights to Europe are cheaper than they've been in years—here's where to go to get the best deals

Dreaming of strolling along the wide avenues in Paris or eating pastas in Rome? Now is the time to make those daydreams of traveling to Europe a reality.

That’s because flights to Europe are the cheapest they’ve been in three years, according to travel app Hopper.

Prices on flights from the U.S. are currently averaging $637 roundtrip, which is down 15 percent from this time last year. Across Europe, if you travel in March, April or May, fares are 20 percent cheaper on average, compared to the summer months of June, July and August.

Traveling in late spring will not only save you money on flights, but on lodging and other travel costs as well. In fact, May is the best time of year to go if you want to spend less on your trip than you would during the summer high season, Liana Corwin, Hopper’s consumer travel expert, tells CNBC Make It.

“Early May is still considered ‘low season’ in many destinations, which means you’ll also be able to scoop up hotel rooms and attractions at a fraction of the high season cost through most of the spring,” Corwin says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: megan leonhardt, nick dolding, digitalvision, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spring, youll, high, theyve, deals, wide, season, flights, travel, europe, cheaper, best, yearsheres, summer, corwin


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An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him

A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo


A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo
An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winter, worth, learned, restaurants, omaha, piccolos, buffett, served, restaurant, important, 2005, steakhouse, waitress, yearsheres, warren


An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here's what she learned from him

For the 81 years Piccolo Pete’s Italian steakhouse was open in Omaha, Nebraska, it was a neighborhood restaurant where families came to eat heaps of pasta with red sauce and 16-oz. T-bone steaks, served by a staff of locals. Above the tables in the wood-paneled dining room, a sparkly crystal ball hung as a relic from the restaurant’s days of hosting ballroom dancing with dinner.

Then, in 2005, something quite exciting happened at the family-run eatery: A billionaire came to dinner.

A very important customer

Warren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. That winter, he decided to have his company Christmas luncheon at the restaurant.

Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. “I can’t lie, I was a little bit nervous,” she tells CNBC Make It. She kept telling herself “He’s just a human.”

Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. His financial conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway has a market cap of more than $472 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to woo as a diner.

Buffett’s event was a big deal for the restaurant (in addition to the obvious reasons) because back then he was known to be a loyal diner at rival Omaha steakhouse Gorat’s, Augustine explains. Now, he was coming to Piccolo’s, and the owners had high hopes he’d become a regular.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, winter, worth, learned, restaurants, omaha, piccolos, buffett, served, restaurant, important, 2005, steakhouse, waitress, yearsheres, warren


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An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him

A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo


A very important customerWarren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to wo
An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here’s what she learned from him Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steakhouse, waitress, important, yearsheres, 2005, learned, worth, buffett, served, restaurants, winter, piccolos, restaurant, warren, omaha


An Omaha waitress served Warren Buffett for 10 years—here's what she learned from him

For the 81 years Piccolo Pete’s Italian steakhouse was open in Omaha, Nebraska, it was a neighborhood restaurant where families came to eat heaps of pasta with red sauce and 16-oz. T-bone steaks, served by a staff of locals. Above the tables in the wood-paneled dining room, a sparkly crystal ball hung as a relic from the restaurant’s days of hosting ballroom dancing with dinner.

Then, in 2005, something quite exciting happened at the family-run eatery: A billionaire came to dinner.

A very important customer

Warren Buffett, “the oracle of Omaha,” first started frequenting Piccolo’s in May of 2005, according to the restaurant’s former general manager, Scott Sheehan. That winter, he decided to have his company Christmas luncheon at the restaurant.

Waitress Ellen Augustine, 43, remembers arriving for her shift on that afternoon in the winter of 2005 — she could sense excitement in the air. “I can’t lie, I was a little bit nervous,” she tells CNBC Make It. She kept telling herself “He’s just a human.”

Today, at 87, Omaha native Buffett is one of the wealthiest people in the world, worth over $82 billion. His financial conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway has a market cap of more than $472 billion. In 2005, Buffett was already worth a fortune — and important to woo as a diner.

Buffett’s event was a big deal for the restaurant (in addition to the obvious reasons) because back then he was known to be a loyal diner at rival Omaha steakhouse Gorat’s, Augustine explains. Now, he was coming to Piccolo’s, and the owners had high hopes he’d become a regular.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-22  Authors: ali montag, courtesy of ellen augustine, courtesy of ryan basye, courtesy of scott sheehan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steakhouse, waitress, important, yearsheres, 2005, learned, worth, buffett, served, restaurants, winter, piccolos, restaurant, warren, omaha


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You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here’s how to know

Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing. More from the Financial Samurai:The average net worth for the above average personRanking the best passive income investments in order to never work againFinancial dependence is the wo


Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing. More from the Financial Samurai:The average net worth for the above average personRanking the best passive income investments in order to never work againFinancial dependence is the wo
You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here’s how to know Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: sam dogen, financial samurai, eclipse sportswire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contribution, average, trend, little, know, 401k, 18, worst, unrelenting, work, yearsheres, millionaire, maximum, worth, limit


You could become a 401(k) millionaire in as little as 18 years—here's how to know

Thanks to the unrelenting rise in the stock market since 2009, there’s now a trend on social media to share your 401(k) balance, especially if it’s over a million bucks. Despite the distastefulness of bragging, just the fact that more people are talking about saving for retirement via their 401(k) is a good thing.

More from the Financial Samurai:

The average net worth for the above average person

Ranking the best passive income investments in order to never work again

Financial dependence is the worst: Why each spouse needs their own bank account

Make no doubt about it, being a 401(k) millionaire is very impressive given the maximum contribution limit has never been higher than 2018’s contribution limit of $18,500. When I was first able to contribute to a 401(k) in 1999, the maximum contribution limit was only $10,000.

Check out the chart below for details.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-01  Authors: sam dogen, financial samurai, eclipse sportswire, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, contribution, average, trend, little, know, 401k, 18, worst, unrelenting, work, yearsheres, millionaire, maximum, worth, limit


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This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here’s why

There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. “I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”


There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. “I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”
This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: robert frank, source, noble black, douglas elliman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, asked, price, whos, weve, way, sell, 40, wants, went, think, mansion, black, yearsheres


This $40 million mansion has been empty for eight years—here's why

There were offers and potential deals along the way, of course. But all of them fell through for various reasons.

To learn more about why some spec mansions often sit empty for years, and why more and more asking prices at the top seem like pure fantasy, “Secret Lives of the Super Rich” toured the home with its current broker, Noble Black. I asked Black what happened to create a price cut of more than 40 percent.

“They were trying to find the market,” Black told me. “They went with what they thought was the right price at the time. We’ve come in and right-priced it.”

I asked him how Kurtz feels about the home.

“I think it’s frustrating for him because he knows how amazing the house is,” Black said. “He literally poured his heart and soul into it. He wants to sell it but I think he also wants to sell it to someone who’s going to love it.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: robert frank, source, noble black, douglas elliman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, million, asked, price, whos, weve, way, sell, 40, wants, went, think, mansion, black, yearsheres


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This self-employed 20-something paid off $39,000 in 5 years—here’s her best piece of advice

Like many Americans, Redd Horrocks got into debt in her twenties. The British native, living in Atlanta, started living above her means when she moved into a new loft. “I picked keeping the peace [with my roommate] over keeping myself debt-free. Before she knew it, Horrocks was $24,000 in the red with little means to pay it off. Then she racked up another $15,000 in debt when she moved to a new city with her boyfriend.


Like many Americans, Redd Horrocks got into debt in her twenties. The British native, living in Atlanta, started living above her means when she moved into a new loft. “I picked keeping the peace [with my roommate] over keeping myself debt-free. Before she knew it, Horrocks was $24,000 in the red with little means to pay it off. Then she racked up another $15,000 in debt when she moved to a new city with her boyfriend.
This self-employed 20-something paid off $39,000 in 5 years—here’s her best piece of advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-30  Authors: shawn m carter, redd horrocks
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, paid, moved, means, 39000, horrocks, writeoff, selfemployed, debt, advice, living, 20something, yearsheres, keeping, 15000, job, best, didnt, piece


This self-employed 20-something paid off $39,000 in 5 years—here’s her best piece of advice

Like many Americans, Redd Horrocks got into debt in her twenties.

The British native, living in Atlanta, started living above her means when she moved into a new loft. “It was gorgeous, I threw great parties,” she tells CNBC Make It. “[But] I didn’t pick it and I honestly couldn’t afford it.

“I picked keeping the peace [with my roommate] over keeping myself debt-free. Everything other than rent went on my credit cards.”

Then she got in a car accident. “I had medical bills. My scooter was a write-off, but I still owed on that, and, to [top] it all off, the insurance company found me liable,” she says.

Before she knew it, Horrocks was $24,000 in the red with little means to pay it off. Then she racked up another $15,000 in debt when she moved to a new city with her boyfriend.

“I was offered an amazing job in another state. I asked my partner, at the time, to come with me,” she says, “which would mean he would leave his job and I would be the sole provider.

“Suffice to say, things didn’t go exactly as planned, and, by the end of one year, I was out of the relationship and left with $15,000 worth of debt that my new salary would barely chip away at.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-08-30  Authors: shawn m carter, redd horrocks
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, paid, moved, means, 39000, horrocks, writeoff, selfemployed, debt, advice, living, 20something, yearsheres, keeping, 15000, job, best, didnt, piece


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