Neuroscientist: Mindfulness ‘is kind of a superpower’ and can help you have ‘a brilliant career’

Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course. Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life. Recognize where you focus your attention”The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris. If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet


Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course.
Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life.
Recognize where you focus your attention”The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris.
If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet
Neuroscientist: Mindfulness ‘is kind of a superpower’ and can help you have ‘a brilliant career’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: sofia pitt, aditi shrikant, myelle lansat
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brilliant, thoughts, recognize, harris, hunter, work, help, superpower, kind, youre, career, thought, attention, stress, neuroscientist, mindfulness


Neuroscientist: Mindfulness 'is kind of a superpower' and can help you have 'a brilliant career'

Sam Harris, neuroscientist, New York Times bestselling author, host of the Making Sense podcast, and creator of the Waking Up course.

Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff all have something in common besides being successful billionaires. They all practice meditation, and credit it as a tool for their success. Research tends to back up the buzz: A 2018 study in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology found that daily mindfulness training, like meditation, can improve productivity, job satisfaction, work-life balance, and reduce stress. “Mindfulness allows you to experience your life in the present without ruminating about what just happened, what should have happened, what almost happened,” says neuroscientist Sam Harris, a New York Times bestselling author, the host of the Making Sense podcast, and the creator of the Waking Up meditation course for beginners. “It is the ability to pay attention to what actually matters.” Though incorporating mindfulness into your own life can be tricky, the challenge is worth it, Harris says, since it “can be the difference between having a brilliant career, surrounded by creative people you love to work with, and being the scary guy in the office who just got fired (again).” Jeremy Hunter, Ph.D., the founding director of the Executive Mind Leadership Institute at the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management, agrees: Mindfulness can give you a “competitive edge at work,” he says, which can help you manage your attention, develop self-awareness, learn to adapt, and regulate your emotional impulses. Here’s how Harris and Hunter say mindfulness can help you in your professional life.

1. Recognize where you focus your attention

“The ability to notice thoughts and emotions arise and pass away, rather than being merely identified with them, is a kind of superpower,” says Harris. But it’s not a superpower we’re born with. Useless mental chatter is the brain’s default and “we never get a moment’s peace for the rest of our lives,” he says. “That is, until we learn to meditate.” We live in an environment that “seduces our attention at every turn … and at the same time we’re using our minds to make a living.” Your capacity to focus your attention is your most valuable asset, but reclaiming our focus requires intention, says Hunter. Hunter tells his students that the first step to becoming more mindful is to observe where attention is being allocated: “Ask yourself, ‘Is what you’re giving your attention to on a daily basis truly meaningful to you?'”

Ask yourself, ‘Is what you’re giving your attention to on a daily basis truly meaningful to you?’ Jeremy Hunter founding director of the Executive Mind Leadership Institute at the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management

This question led one of his students to recognize she was spending the first 30 minutes of her day in bed scrolling through Instagram. She was shocked to learn that amounted to 3.5 hours a week. After you observe where you’re putting your attention, you start to recognize which routine behaviors may be reducing your productivity, and therefore hindering your success. Outlining your priorities can help you catalog what’s unproductive. If you’re writing an important email and your attention shifts to searching the internet for what you should make for dinner, say, mindfulness helps you recognize you’re being distracted. Instead of letting it lead you away, “ask yourself, ‘Is this the best use of my time?'” says Hunter.

2. Gain insight into your thought patterns

Being mindful doesn’t mean you’ll stop experiencing distraction or no longer entertain negative thoughts or emotions. Instead, it teaches you to assign less value to those thoughts. “The goal isn’t to stop thinking. Rather, it’s to recognize thoughts as transitory appearances in consciousness,” says Harris. Not all negative feelings are counterproductive, he says. He uses exercise as an analogy for how negative feelings can serve as motivation: At the gym, you voluntarily create physical stress by running in place or lifting heavy weights. When you leave the gym, you don’t keep tensing your muscles and elevating your heart rate for no reason. You physically relax. “You want to have a similar relationship to periods of psychological stress. Can you put down your five-year plan so that you can actually enjoy dinner with your family? Not if you’re helplessly identified with every thought that comes lurching into consciousness,” Harris says. Meditate for as little as 10 minutes a day and you’ll slowly start to increase the amount of time you’re able to pay attention to the present. That ability will start to seep into other aspects of life, says Harris. You can then take a step back, categorize the feeling or thought as useless, and avoid manifesting ill feelings or acting impulsively.

3. Apply these techniques at work


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-19  Authors: sofia pitt, aditi shrikant, myelle lansat
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5 questions to ask yourself if you’re unsure about applying for a new credit card

If your credit card no longer suits your needs, it may be time to apply for a new one. Some credit card issuers have tools that can help you decide if the card you’re considering makes sense for your lifestyle. The best way to get the most of your credit card is to pay your bill on time and in full each month. However, if you want to shop around for the best credit card offers, consider pre-qualification forms. Just know, pre-qualification is not a guarantee of approval and when you submit a for


If your credit card no longer suits your needs, it may be time to apply for a new one.
Some credit card issuers have tools that can help you decide if the card you’re considering makes sense for your lifestyle.
The best way to get the most of your credit card is to pay your bill on time and in full each month.
However, if you want to shop around for the best credit card offers, consider pre-qualification forms.
Just know, pre-qualification is not a guarantee of approval and when you submit a for
5 questions to ask yourself if you’re unsure about applying for a new credit card Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white anna hecht, alexandria white, anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, applying, youre, cash, consider, questions, fee, apr, unsure, credit, offers, card, interest, ask, cards, big


5 questions to ask yourself if you're unsure about applying for a new credit card

If your credit card no longer suits your needs, it may be time to apply for a new one. To decide whether you’ve outgrown your current card, there are a few different things to consider. Below, CNBC Select walks you through the questions to ask yourself before pulling the trigger on a new card.

1. Are you earning rewards in the right categories?

Because different credit cards offer different rewards based on the spending category, it’s smart to consider where most of your money is actually going. For instance, if you regularly dine out, you may want to consider getting the Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card, which offers 4% cash-back on dining. Or, if you are big on cooking, the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express earns users 6% back on up to $6,000 spent per year at U.S. supermarkets (then 1%). (See rates and fees.) Some credit card issuers have tools that can help you decide if the card you’re considering makes sense for your lifestyle. For example, the TD Cash Credit Card, which offers 2% cash back at grocery stores and 3% cash back on dining, has a calculator that estimates how much you could earn annually based on your monthly spend on dining, groceries, travel, and other purchases.

2. Are you paying high interest?

The best way to get the most of your credit card is to pay your bill on time and in full each month. But if that’s not possible, you don’t want to be stuck paying a high interest rates on the money you owe. If you’ve got a card with a big balance and a steep interest rate, you might want to consider doing a balance transfer to a credit card with a 0% intro APR. The Wells Fargo Platinum Visa® card offers 0% interest for the first 18 months (then 17.24% to 26.74% variable APR) and the U.S. Bank Visa® Platinum Card offers 0% APR for the first 18 billing cycles (then 14.24% to 25.24% variable APR). (Read more about how balance transfer cards work.)

3. Does the annual fee outweigh the benefits?

It’s tempting to sign up for a card with a high annual fee because they often come with a lot of cool perks, like statement credits, access to upgrades and big welcome bonuses. But before you shell over money for a card, you want to make sure you can afford the fee and will use the card enough that it’s worth the cost. For instance, let’s say you frequently travel and are looking at travel credit cards. These cards can have annual fees upwards of $450, but often provide numerous statement credits and perks that help offset the steep fee. The Chase Sapphire Reserve® comes with a $450 annual fee, but offers a $300 annual travel credit and access to over 1,000 lounges with Priority Pass Select membership (valued at approximately $429). Those perks effectively add up to over a $729 value and don’t include credit for a Global Entry ($100) or TSA PreCheck ($85) application (every four years).

4. Do you have a big purchase coming up?

If you plan on taking on a large expense, such as a major appliance or cost of a medical procedure, it can be a good idea to put that charge on a card offering no interest on new purchases for six to 18 months. These cards allow you to pay off debt over time without incurring interest fees — just make sure you pay off your balance in full by the end of the intro period. One option for financing a big purchase is the Capital One® Quicksilver® Cash Rewards Credit Card. This card offers no interest for the first 15 months on new purchases (then 15.74% to 25.74% variable APR). Plus, you earn 1.5% cash back on every purchase.

5. Have you applied for a card in the last six months?

If you apply for credit cards too frequently, card issuers may see this as a red flag and potential indicator that you may not be a responsible cardholder. However, if you want to shop around for the best credit card offers, consider pre-qualification forms. Most card issuers offer pre-qualification, which allows you to check your qualification chances without hurting your credit score. Simply fill in some information and receive an answer to whether you may qualify, with no damage to your credit score. Just know, pre-qualification is not a guarantee of approval and when you submit a formal credit card application your credit will be pulled, which dings your score. For rates and fees of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, please click here.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: alexandria white anna hecht, alexandria white, anna hecht
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Here’s where you can score Halloween candy for less than $20

CNBC Make It took a look at the prices for trick-or-treat candy offered by major retailers in the New York City metro area. Specifically, we looked at the overall cost for at least 300 pieces of fun-sized candy from premium brands, including a mix of chocolate and fruity options. Nearly 70% of those participating in Halloween festivities say they are planning to hand out candy. If you only have a couple dozen trick-or-treaters, many retailers have good deals on smaller bags of candy. We found th


CNBC Make It took a look at the prices for trick-or-treat candy offered by major retailers in the New York City metro area.
Specifically, we looked at the overall cost for at least 300 pieces of fun-sized candy from premium brands, including a mix of chocolate and fruity options.
Nearly 70% of those participating in Halloween festivities say they are planning to hand out candy.
If you only have a couple dozen trick-or-treaters, many retailers have good deals on smaller bags of candy.
We found th
Here’s where you can score Halloween candy for less than $20 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mars, halloween, bags, youre, score, fruity, candy, chocolate, prices, need, heres, variety


Here's where you can score Halloween candy for less than $20

But before you rush out to buy candy that will make you the house to beat in your neighborhood this year, take a minute to shop around for the best deals. CNBC Make It took a look at the prices for trick-or-treat candy offered by major retailers in the New York City metro area. Specifically, we looked at the overall cost for at least 300 pieces of fun-sized candy from premium brands, including a mix of chocolate and fruity options.

“Spending hasn’t changed much over the past few years, but we are seeing a noticeable increase in consumers whose Halloween purchases are inspired by their friends, neighbors and even celebrities on social media,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay said. That includes all aspects of Halloween, from the costumes to the parties to the delicious treats.

To fund those celebrations, people will spend about $86 on items such as costumes and decorations, according to the Federation. And of course, candy. Nearly 70% of those participating in Halloween festivities say they are planning to hand out candy.

About 172 million Americans are planning to celebrate Halloween this year, according to the National Retail Federation’s annual survey .

Walgreens offers the cheapest prices if you’re looking to get a few hundred fun-sized candies for trick-or-treaters. The drug store has all of the popular brands on sale for in-store purchases. To get a good mix of at least 300 fruity and chocolate treats, we found that buying a combination of sizes and brands worked best.

Of course, each retailer sells slightly different options at a range of prices, so you may need to do some mental math as you shop to determine if mixing and matching two bags of 150-count candies is really cheaper than simply buying one bag that contains over 300 pieces and has a variety of brands.

For the winning combination at Walgreens, we shopped four different bags of treats:

Depending on your neighborhood, you may have different candy needs. If you only have a couple dozen trick-or-treaters, many retailers have good deals on smaller bags of candy. Or you could even splurge on full-sized candy bars.

While Costco didn’t have a wide enough selection of bagged candy to make our analysis, the retailer is offering 30-count variety packs of Mars bar chocolate for $13.29 and Hershey’s for $13.49, according to the Krazy Coupon Lady. Rite-Aid is also offering a pack of 18 full-sized chocolate bars for $12.88.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, if you’re expecting hundreds of visitors during trick-or-treating, then you’ll need to really stock up. We found that fruity candy varieties, such as Skittles, Starbursts, SweeTarts, Laffy Taffy and Nerds, typically tend to be less expensive than bags of Hershey’s or Mars chocolates.

If you’re looking for a variety bag of candies, Target has 400-count packs of Mars chocolates (Snickers, M&Ms, Milky Way, 3 Musketeers and Twix) on sale for $16.24 each if you buy two. You’ll need to use Target’s in-app coupon to get the deal.

Don’t miss: 4 things to consider before wearing a Halloween costume to work

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: megan leonhardt
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73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey

This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day. The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%). With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information. If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for


This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day.
The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%).
With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information.
If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for
73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, rank, life, credit, survey, creditwise, card, youre, capital, finances, americans, according, score, users, stressed


73% of Americans rank their finances as the No. 1 stress in life, according to new Capital One CreditWise survey

If the state of your finances is stressing you out, you’re far from alone.

This week Capital One released the results of a new CreditWise survey, in connection with National Get Smart About Credit Day. The results found that finances are the number-one cause of stress (73%) — more than politics (59%), work (49%) and family (46%).

Younger generations are even more stressed out about finances than older generations with the majority of Gen Z’ers (82%) and millennials (81%) saying finances are at least somewhat stressful.

The survey unsurprisingly found that major life events can trigger financial stress as well. More than half (62%) were stressed about their money in relationship to buying a house, 61% were stressed because of a car purchase.

Despite finances being a major cause of stress, respondents are optimistic about their financial future. Roughly two in five (42%) said they expect to be better off financially in a year from now.

However, they may not know how to achieve those goals. Only 16% of respondents are very familiar with how to improve their credit score, but more than half of the respondents (59%) are interested in learning more.

Capital One provides a free credit score and report dashboard, CreditWise. It’s free to use, and anyone can join — you don’t need to have a Capital One account.

With CreditWise, users can learn more about the key factors that impact your credit score, get email alerts whenever your credit report changes and monitor your credit information. There’s also a simulator feature that allows you to see how certain actions may impact your credit score, such as paying off debt, carrying a balance or applying for a loan. The simulator only provides estimates of the potential negative or positive impacts and the actual results may differ.

“There are millions of CreditWise users, and hundreds of thousands of those users who had a score of zero when they enrolled have since established a credit score,” Chris Gatz, head of CreditWise at Capital One, tells CNBC Select.

It can be smart to use a credit monitoring program to keep an eye on your credit score, as that three-digit number can have a big impact on the kind of credit cards you will qualify for. Typically, the higher your credit score, the better card offers you receive.

If you have good or excellent credit, you may qualify more for the best rewards credit cards, such as the Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card, or a balance transfer credit card, such as the Amex EveryDay® Credit Card, compared to someone who has bad credit.

If you’re credit is subpar, you’re not out of luck. Secured cards are a great way to build credit, and CNBC Select recommends the Discover it® Secured.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, rank, life, credit, survey, creditwise, card, youre, capital, finances, americans, according, score, users, stressed


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The job that people are least likely to quit pays more than $100,000—here are the other 19

That said, there are some jobs where people are less likely to leave, and good pay is just one component. That’s not to say a job seeker who searched outside their field ended up taking the job they clicked on, but search activity could indicate in which occupations people are more loyal. Software engineers, front end developers, network engineers, web developers and database administrators are most likely to keep their new-job search to similar tech roles. However, a few surprising roles stand


That said, there are some jobs where people are less likely to leave, and good pay is just one component.
That’s not to say a job seeker who searched outside their field ended up taking the job they clicked on, but search activity could indicate in which occupations people are more loyal.
Software engineers, front end developers, network engineers, web developers and database administrators are most likely to keep their new-job search to similar tech roles.
However, a few surprising roles stand
The job that people are least likely to quit pays more than $100,000—here are the other 19 Cached Page below :
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The job that people are least likely to quit pays more than $100,000—here are the other 19

It’s rare for people to stay in the same line of work their entire career — the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates the average person holds about 12 jobs within their lifetime, and the median tenure with a given employer is just over four years.

That said, there are some jobs where people are less likely to leave, and good pay is just one component.

To assess which workers are least likely to switch careers, Indeed economist Andrew Flowers identified the top 300 jobs held by Indeed users with a college degree, then analyzed what types of listings those job seekers were searching for. He gave each role a “career-switch search rate,” or the likelihood someone in that field was to click on a job ad in a different occupational category, as defined by the BLS.

That’s not to say a job seeker who searched outside their field ended up taking the job they clicked on, but search activity could indicate in which occupations people are more loyal. The career-switch search rate also doesn’t take into account people who searched for different titles within the same occupation (a camera operator who wants to become a video editor, for example).

Tech and health-care roles, particularly ones that pay over six figures, dominate the list. At No.1, just 11% of java developers searched for a role outside their career category, and they earn a mean salary of $106,810. Software engineers, front end developers, network engineers, web developers and database administrators are most likely to keep their new-job search to similar tech roles.

Those in nursing also stayed within their field. Health-care jobs are predicted to be some of the fastest-growing opportunities of the next decade and generally require extensive education and training, so professionals are less likely to switch careers after establishing themselves in the field.

It’s not surprising that tech and health-care workers stay where they are, Flowers tells CNBC Make It, because they’re in high demand, command good salaries and have job security in growing industries.

However, a few surprising roles stand out on the “no-switch” list: art directors, directors of human resources and truck drivers.

Such findings could indicate art directors find high meaning in their work, Flowers says, given the years of experience required to reach that level.

And HR professionals sticking to their career may reflect the state of the job market: “Businesses need directors of HR to get the right talent and staff up within the tight labor market,” Flowers says. “There’s a lot of job security there because your skills are in demand.”

Truck driver openings are some of the most popular on Indeed, Flowers explains. “For the last decade, as the economy has recovered from the Great Recession, trucking companies have consistently told the press and economists that they have a hard time attracting talent,” he says, which may be why they appear so frequently on the job site. “Even though the pay is high, it’s a tough lifestyle and a lot of hours.”

Once truck drivers have made lifestyle adjustments for the role, they may be more likely to stick with it thanks to generous pay, which Indeed reports is over $95,000 a year.

The list is good news for people in highly skilled, in-demand roles, who can leverage the tight labor market in their favor.

“If you’re a job seeker and you’re in one of these roles, and you’re happy in your field and don’t want to switch careers, you still have a lot of opportunities,” Flowers says. “Your compensation and benefits should be competitive, because there are a lot of companies looking to hire you.”

And for every other worker not represented on this list (which is a lot): “If you’re looking to change up your career trajectory, you’re not alone,” Flowers says. “It’s very common.”

Here are the top jobs where workers are staying put, plus how much they pay according to salary information posted to Indeed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: jennifer liu
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How to save $1 million on a $75,000 salary, broken down by your age

If you’re making $75,000 a year, the thought of saving $1 million for retirement can seem daunting. Yet with a little dedication and time, you can get there regardless of your age. As a rule of thumb, most financial advisors suggest you save 10% to 15% of your salary. If your goal is to get to $1 million, the percentage you need to invest will vary widely based on how old you are when you start. NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you exactly how much of your $75,000 you’ll need to


If you’re making $75,000 a year, the thought of saving $1 million for retirement can seem daunting.
Yet with a little dedication and time, you can get there regardless of your age.
As a rule of thumb, most financial advisors suggest you save 10% to 15% of your salary.
If your goal is to get to $1 million, the percentage you need to invest will vary widely based on how old you are when you start.
NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you exactly how much of your $75,000 you’ll need to
How to save $1 million on a $75,000 salary, broken down by your age Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: robert exley jr noah higgins-dunn, robert exley jr, noah higgins-dunn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 75000, salary, youll, youre, retirement, invest, save, million, need, age, broken, plan, youhow, numbers


How to save $1 million on a $75,000 salary, broken down by your age

If you’re making $75,000 a year, the thought of saving $1 million for retirement can seem daunting. Yet with a little dedication and time, you can get there regardless of your age.

As a rule of thumb, most financial advisors suggest you save 10% to 15% of your salary. If your goal is to get to $1 million, the percentage you need to invest will vary widely based on how old you are when you start.

NerdWallet crunched the numbers, and we can tell you exactly how much of your $75,000 you’ll need to tuck away to get there.

Just a few things to remember: these numbers assume you have no money in your retirement plan, that you will get a 6% return on your investments and that you will retire at age 65.

The math also does not account for potential pay increases, employer matches, inflation or any curveballs that life may throw at you. So plan accordingly.

Now, let’s dive into the figures.

More from Invest in You:

How Walmart and other big companies are trying to recruit more teenage employees

Disclosure: NBCUniversal and Comcast Ventures are investors in Acorns.


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‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves. When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support. If Rapinoe’s current ba


But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.
In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men.
When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.
When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.
If Rapinoe’s current ba
‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe Cached Page below :
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'Never back down'—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

According to the lawsuit, if the men’s and women’s teams won each of the 20 non-tournament games they are contractually required to play, women’s team players would earn a maximum of $99,000 ($4,950 per game), while men’s team players would earn $263,320 ($13,166 per game).

To be sure, few athletes have schedules as packed as Rapinoe. This year, the 2019 FIFA best women’s player award-winner helped the United States clinch a record-breaking fourth World Cup championship and co-founded a business — all while leading her team through their lawsuit against the USSF for gender discrimination and unequal pay.

“The attention’s not exhausting,” she says. “The logistics of it all is exhausting.”

From the outside, all the activity and attention seem exhausting.

The player is currently in the training for the 2020 Summer Olympics and is also involved in highly-publicized negotiations with the U.S. Soccer Federation. She is also being constantly pulled for photos and interviews.

It’s a rainy Wednesday on the night of the Women’s Sports Foundation’s Annual Salute and Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the U.S. Women’s National Team, is about to win an award for being the 2019 Team Sportswoman of the Year.

Megan Rapinoe accepts her WSF Sportswoman Of The Year Award (Team Sport) at The Women’s Sports Foundation’s 40th Annual Salute to Women in Sports Awards Gala, celebrating the most accomplished women in sports and the girls they inspire at Cipriani Wall Street on October 16, 2019 in New York City.

Balancing her commitments on and off the field is an imperfect art, she admits.

“In order for me to be my absolute best [in soccer], I have to not do anything else,” she tells CNBC Make It. “But in order for me to capitalize on everything that I’m doing on the field, I have to be pulled away from what I’m doing.”

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.

“It’s what female athletes do. We have to do everything,” she says. “Not only do we have to do everything you need for our sport, we have to maximize everything financially outside of our sport, which takes days and time and flights. And then there’s the advocacy part.”

This balancing act is something many women can relate to. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.

Economists estimate that the U.S. gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. For black, Latina and Native American women, this gap is even wider.

Rapinoe’s advice to women who are working on balancing it all while advocating and negotiating for themselves is simple: “Do not back down,” she says. “You’re probably going against your employer or your boss and it can be very daunting, but believe in yourself and believe in what you’re doing and just don’t back down.”

When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.

“It’s hard sometimes, but seek out other women or networks to boost your confidence,” she explains. “We’re really lucky being on a team; we have 23 other women. If ever you’re feeling a wavering moment, everyone’s like ‘We’ve got this!’ We’re lucky in that sense.

“But yeah, just never back down.”

As for the USWNT’s negotiations, the team isn’t showing signs of backing down either. In August, mediation talks between the USWNT and the USSF fell apart, and the case is scheduled to go to trial on May 5, 2020, if a resolution is not found.

Rapinoe says she hopes the two groups can come to a settlement before then. “I don’t think a really public trial is in their best interest for sure, but hopefully not ours,” she says. “It’s gonna take a lot of time and energy on everyone’s part to go through a whole public trial.”

If Rapinoe’s current balancing act is any evidence, it seems she is prepared to give her time and energy to the cause.

“Hopefully it ends in something that both sides feel good about,” she says.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, megan, youre, womens, gap, rapinoe, sport, balancing, energy, raise, women, negotiate, work, team, downhow


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Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi

Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi3 Hours AgoShyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound. For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.


Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi3 Hours AgoShyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound.
For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.
Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pound, citi, wait, trading, investors, sterling, british, youre, neutral, long, profits


Take profits now if you're long on the British pound: Citi

Take profits now if you’re long on the British pound: Citi

3 Hours Ago

Shyam Devani of Citi says investors should wait for more clarity on Brexit before trading the British pound. For now, he is “absolutely neutral” on sterling, he says.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pound, citi, wait, trading, investors, sterling, british, youre, neutral, long, profits


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4 strategies to balance your full-time job and side hustle without burning out

Working a full-time job and taking on a side hustle can be overwhelming. Yet nearly half, or 45%, of working Americans, report having a side hustle in addition to their full-time job, according to a June 2019 Bankrate Survey of 2,550 adults. Here are four strategies for balancing your full-time job with your side gig to help you avoid burnout. That way, if things pick up at your full-time job, you won’t feel overworked. “If you have a full-time job” in addition to a side hustle, “give yourself p


Working a full-time job and taking on a side hustle can be overwhelming.
Yet nearly half, or 45%, of working Americans, report having a side hustle in addition to their full-time job, according to a June 2019 Bankrate Survey of 2,550 adults.
Here are four strategies for balancing your full-time job with your side gig to help you avoid burnout.
That way, if things pick up at your full-time job, you won’t feel overworked.
“If you have a full-time job” in addition to a side hustle, “give yourself p
4 strategies to balance your full-time job and side hustle without burning out Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, strategies, hustle, cheng, work, say, spending, burning, fulltime, balance, business, youre, dont


4 strategies to balance your full-time job and side hustle without burning out

Working a full-time job and taking on a side hustle can be overwhelming. Yet nearly half, or 45%, of working Americans, report having a side hustle in addition to their full-time job, according to a June 2019 Bankrate Survey of 2,550 adults. Of those, approximately 30% say they’ve taken on the extra work to help pay for day-to-day living expenses. Trying to balance both can lead to burnout, but it doesn’t have to. It’s possible to maintain a job and a gig while staying healthy and well, experts say. And it’s important to try, since burnout — a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion caused by prolonged stress — isn’t good for business. It can lead to anxiety, loss of appetite, or not feeling like yourself, says Marguerita Cheng, a certified financial planner and chief executive officer at Blue Ocean Global Wealth in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Here are four strategies for balancing your full-time job with your side gig to help you avoid burnout.

1. Limit the time you spend on your side hustle

Your responsibilities may feel never-ending if you’re filling your time outside of work with, well, more and different work. That can be especially true if you’re pursuing a hustle you love or if your gig is a step on the path to taking your passion full time. Side hustle consultant Leah Gervais, whose company Urban 20 Something offers e-courses on sustaining and scaling a business, told Grow earlier this year that it can help to contain your side hustle to a set number of hours each day or week. That way, you can find that you’re less stressed out and better able to manage your time. Pacing yourself is important, adds Cheng. The hours scheduled for your side hustle can be minimal, like limiting dog walks to twice a week, or spending a couple hours on an art project. That way, if things pick up at your full-time job, you won’t feel overworked. Plus, you want to make sure you’re also budgeting time for errands, cleaning, or watching an episode of your favorite show.

Video by Euralis Weekes Pacing yourself means knowing when to say no, says Cheng. “Don’t sacrifice your free time to take on more work,” she says. “You can also say to someone, ‘I appreciate the trust and confidence in my work. As much as I would love to do ABC, I don’t think I’m able to do what you require or need.'” When it comes to your side hustle, you’re the boss. That means even if it’s hard to turn down work, you can realize when it might be the right thing to do. It may not be realistic to put away your phone and unplug for an entire weekend, but you can take Sunday off every now and then, Cheng suggests.

2. Outsource basic tasks

If you find that you’re overworked or you want more time for your side hustle, there is no shame in outsourcing tasks unrelated to your earning opportunities, especially if you find them stressful. That might mean ordering takeout or hiring a cleaning service. Just be mindful that it can cost extra to outsource: For example, it typically costs $130 for a service to clean an entire home. Still, you may find the expense is worth it. “If you have a full-time job” in addition to a side hustle, “give yourself permission to take time off,” Cheng says. In a series of articles in the Harvard Business Review, researchers found that spending as little as $40 on something that saves time (in their example, an hour of home cleaning through TaskRabbit) will make you happier than spending that money on stuff — especially if you use that purchased time to do something you enjoy.

3. Don’t compare yourself to others

Cheng suggests not comparing yourself to others who seem to be in similar situations. If you see someone online who works a full-time job, has children, and runs a business, for example, don’t try to measure your success against theirs. It can make you feel bad about yourself, and that isn’t helpful. “Just because you see someone else doing something on social media, don’t get the impression that they have it all together. You don’t know what they are experiencing behind closed doors,” she says. “Everyone is different.” Keep the focus on what you want to achieve and how you’re faring when compared against your own goals.

4. Make the most of your downtime


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: myelle lansat, anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, strategies, hustle, cheng, work, say, spending, burning, fulltime, balance, business, youre, dont


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A good credit score can save you thousands of dollars—here’s how to understand and check yours for free

What is a credit scoreA credit score is a three-digit number, typically ranging from 300 to 850, that is the result of an analysis of your credit file. Credit scores consider various factors, such as payment history and length of credit history, from your current and past credit accounts (more on that below). Rating Credit Score Very poor 300-579 Fair 580-669 Good 670-739 Very good 740-799 Exceptional 800-850Types of credit scores: FICO vs. VantageScoreThere are two main credit scoring models: F


What is a credit scoreA credit score is a three-digit number, typically ranging from 300 to 850, that is the result of an analysis of your credit file.
Credit scores consider various factors, such as payment history and length of credit history, from your current and past credit accounts (more on that below).
Rating Credit Score Very poor 300-579 Fair 580-669 Good 670-739 Very good 740-799 Exceptional 800-850Types of credit scores: FICO vs. VantageScoreThere are two main credit scoring models: F
A good credit score can save you thousands of dollars—here’s how to understand and check yours for free Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vantagescore, save, score, understand, scores, history, free, dollarsheres, good, card, credit, youre, fico, checking, check, thousands


A good credit score can save you thousands of dollars—here's how to understand and check yours for free

Your credit score is arguably the most important number in your financial life, and these days it’s easier to check than ever. Before you apply for a new credit card, personal loan or mortgage, it’s important to know your score, since it will give you insight into what products you may qualify for and what interest rates to expect. Checking your credit score doesn’t hurt your credit, and even if you’re not applying for credit, it’s smart to get into the habit of checking it regularly. In fact, the simple act of checking your credit score is one way you can improve your credit. If you notice a dip in your score, it may alert you to potential fraud or errors on your report. Checking your score monthly may help you catch issues early and get a head start on resolving them. Below, CNBC Select breaks down everything you need to know about your credit score.

What is a credit score

A credit score is a three-digit number, typically ranging from 300 to 850, that is the result of an analysis of your credit file. That magic number tells lenders your potential credit risk and ability to repay loans. Credit scores consider various factors, such as payment history and length of credit history, from your current and past credit accounts (more on that below). Credit score ranges vary based on the model used (FICO versus VantageScore) and the credit bureau (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) that pulls the score. The ratings typically include bad/poor, fair/average, good and excellent/exceptional. The rating you receive depends on the credit score you have. Below, you can check which rating you fall into, using estimates from Experian.

Rating Credit Score Very poor 300-579 Fair 580-669 Good 670-739 Very good 740-799 Exceptional 800-850

Types of credit scores: FICO vs. VantageScore

There are two main credit scoring models: FICO and VantageScore. However, lenders have a clear preference for FICO; its model is used in over 90% of U.S. lending decisions. FICO and VantageScore credit scores have some similarities: In both, scores range from 300 to 850 and payment history is the most influential factor in determining your score. But they differ in exactly how they weight and rank several other factors.

How are credit scores calculated?

Credit scores are calculated differently depending on the credit scoring model. Here are the key factors FICO and VantageScore consider. FICO Score Payment history (35%): Whether you’ve paid past credit accounts on time Amounts owed (30%): The total amount of credit and loans you’re using compared to your total credit limit, also known as your utilization rate Length of credit history (15%): The length of time you’ve had credit New credit (10%): How often you apply for and open new accounts Credit mix (10%): The variety of credit products you have, including credit cards, installment loans, finance company accounts, mortgage loans and so on VantageScore Extremely influential: Payment history Highly influential: Type and duration of credit and percent of credit limit used Moderately influential: Total balances/debt Less influential: Available credit and recent credit behavior and inquiries

Which credit score should you check?

Credit expert John Ulzheimer, formerly of FICO and Equifax, recommends checking both your FICO and VantageScore credit scores to get an accurate picture of what your lenders will see. After all, you never know which score your prospective lender is going to pull. Plus, checking your credit score is free, so you can only benefit from reviewing it.

What doesn’t impact your credit score?

There are many common misconceptions about what does affect your credit score. “Consumers sometimes focus on things that simply don’t matter to their scores. The most common is information about your wealth,” says Ulzheimer. “Income, balances in retirement accounts, equity in your home, net worth … anything that defines how much money you have or how much you’re worth are not considered by your credit scores.” Other factors that don’t affect your credit score include race, religion, nationality, gender, marital status, age, political affiliation, education, occupation, job title, employer, employment history, where you live or your total assets.

What’s the difference between a credit score and a credit report?

Your credit score is different from your credit report. A credit report is a more holistic view of your credit that shows detailed information about your credit activity and current credit situation. Credit reports detail personal information (name, address, Social Security number), credit accounts (payment history, credit limit, account balance), public records (liens, bankruptcies, foreclosures) and inquiries into your credit. The three main credit bureaus who issue reports are Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. “Your credit scores are a proxy for the health of your credit reports,” says Ulzheimer. “So if you’re not going to take the time to pull and review all three of your credit reports, then at the very least you should check your credit scores,”

Free credit score resources

Most credit card issuers provide free credit score access to their cardholders making it easier than ever to check and know your score. Some issuers, such as Citi and Discover, provide free FICO Scores, while others, such as Chase and Capital One, provide free VantageScores. You can check your credit score in less than five minutes by logging into your credit card issuer’s site or a free credit score service and navigating to the credit score section. There will typically be a dashboard listing your score and the factors that influence it. FICO and VantageScore will pull your credit score from one of the three major credit bureaus, Experian, Equifax or TransUnion. Here are some free credit score resources that you can access, whether you’re a cardholder or not: CreditWise from Capital One: Free VantageScore from TransUnion

Chase Credit Journey: Free VantageScore from TransUnion

Discover Credit Scorecard: Free FICO Score from Experian These resources also provide insight into the key factors affecting your credit score, simulators on how certain actions may affect your credit and helpful tips for improving your credit score.

How does your credit score impact credit cards you qualify for?

The higher your credit score, the more cards you can qualify for (and often with better interest rates). If you have an excellent score, you’ll have better qualification odds for a premium credit card, such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve®, one of CNBC Select’s top-recommended travel rewards card, compared to someone with fair credit. Meanwhile, if you’re new to credit or are looking to rebuild poor credit, we recommend looking into a secured card, such as the Discover it® Secured, which allows you access to a credit card after you put down a refundable security deposit.

Information about the Chase Sapphire Reserve® has been collected independently by CNBC and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the CNBC Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vantagescore, save, score, understand, scores, history, free, dollarsheres, good, card, credit, youre, fico, checking, check, thousands


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