YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California. Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.” Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious mater
YouTube CEO says ‘sorry,’ but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


YouTube CEO says 'sorry,' but defends hosting videos with homophobic slurs

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks during the opening keynote address at the Google I/O 2017 Conference at Shoreline Amphitheater on May 17, 2017 in Mountain View, California.

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona — YouTube’s chief executive apologized on Monday for the hurt she said is caused by videos with anti-gay slurs, but said the company was right to let the videos remain on its service.

CEO Susan Wojcicki, in an on-stage interview at the tech-focused Code Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, spoke publicly for the first time since YouTube last week imposed a stricter ban on hate speech, including videos that promote ideas of racial superiority.

But rather than being lauded for tackling Nazism, Wojcicki was met with a barrage of questions about videos she has decided to leave up. The questions were prompted by journalist Carlos Maza launching a campaign last month to bring attention to homophobic abuse and harassment he says he received from a conservative YouTube personality.

Maza said that he has been the subject of targeted harassment for years that included both anti-gay and anti-Mexican slurs. Several activists are lobbying to ban YouTube’s parent company, Google, from the San Francisco Pride march this month over what they see as the service’s inaction.

“I know the decision we made was very hurtful to the LGBTQ community,” Wojcicki said. “That was not our intention at all. We’re really sorry about that.”

But, she added, YouTube looked at the videos in question, “and in the end, we decided it was not violative of our policy.”

“I do agree this was the right decision,” she said.

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Wojcicki, a high-profile Silicon Valley executive, faced a skeptical crowd at the annual conference for tech and media professionals. When Ina Fried, a journalist from Axios, suggested during a question-and-answer period that Wojcicki wasn’t actually sorry, the audience greeted the question with applause.

YouTube, like Facebook and other online services that rely on users for content, is facing growing scrutiny over material that shows violence, promotes hatred or is objectionable in other ways. The service’s rulebook bans harassment, for example, but only when it is “malicious.”

Wojcicki said that YouTube has a “high bar” for what counts as malicious material, and that the service faced a challenge in being consistent. She said the same rules needed to apply across the board, including to late-night comedy shows or rap music videos.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: dylan byers, david ingram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, homophobic, hosting, videos, harassment, conference, ceo, youtubes, defends, susan, slurs, youtube, sorry, wojcicki, services


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Mary Meeker: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter are in favorable position

07:34 | 10:34 AM ET Tue, 28 May 2019


07:34 | 10:34 AM ET Tue, 28 May 2019
Mary Meeker: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter are in favorable position Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meeker, twitter, favorable, position, 28, 1034, facebook, et, 0734, youtube, 2019, mary


Mary Meeker: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter are in favorable position

07:34 | 10:34 AM ET Tue, 28 May 2019


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meeker, twitter, favorable, position, 28, 1034, facebook, et, 0734, youtube, 2019, mary


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The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working ‘every single day’

Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City. Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers. A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details. “The Google negotiation for example, between App


Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City. Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers. A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details. “The Google negotiation for example, between App
The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working ‘every single day’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, 2019, deal, york, apple, single, search, google, dollar, youtube, university, working, took, months, sewell, day, multibillion


The multi-billion dollar search deal between Google and Apple took four months working 'every single day'

Tim Cook participates in a panel discussion during the TIME 100 Summit 2019 on April 23, 2019 in New York City.

Google pays Apple billions of dollars to be the default search engine in the Safari browser on iPhones and Mac computers.

A deal like that doesn’t come together overnight, and a new interview with Apple’s former general counsel Bruce Sewell reveals just how involved the most senior levels of both companies were hammering out the details.

“The Google negotiation for example, between Apple and Google over search, probably took us four months,” Sewell said in an interview with Columbia University law students posted to YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, 2019, deal, york, apple, single, search, google, dollar, youtube, university, working, took, months, sewell, day, multibillion


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Britain’s best known stockpicker posts apology on Youtube after suspension of flagship fund

Britain’s best known portfolio manager apologized to investors after being forced to suspend trading on his flagship fund after mounting losses and withdrawals. Neil Woodford, who launched Woodford Investment Management in 2014 after a successful spell at Invesco Perpetual, posted a YouTube video late Tuesday in which he explained the decision and offered an emotional apology to the thousands of investors affected by the suspension. The firm announced Monday that it would suspend all trading in


Britain’s best known portfolio manager apologized to investors after being forced to suspend trading on his flagship fund after mounting losses and withdrawals. Neil Woodford, who launched Woodford Investment Management in 2014 after a successful spell at Invesco Perpetual, posted a YouTube video late Tuesday in which he explained the decision and offered an emotional apology to the thousands of investors affected by the suspension. The firm announced Monday that it would suspend all trading in
Britain’s best known stockpicker posts apology on Youtube after suspension of flagship fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, britains, trading, stockpicker, suspension, investment, youtube, best, apology, suspend, known, firm, million, billion, fund, video, posts, woodford, flagship


Britain's best known stockpicker posts apology on Youtube after suspension of flagship fund

Britain’s best known portfolio manager apologized to investors after being forced to suspend trading on his flagship fund after mounting losses and withdrawals.

Neil Woodford, who launched Woodford Investment Management in 2014 after a successful spell at Invesco Perpetual, posted a YouTube video late Tuesday in which he explained the decision and offered an emotional apology to the thousands of investors affected by the suspension.

The firm announced Monday that it would suspend all trading in the Woodford Equity Income fund after the redemption of a £250 million ($318 million) investment from local authority Kent County Council.

In the three-minute video, Woodford said his current strategy is to reduce the fund’s exposure to illiquid and unquoted stocks to zero, a process which was made “much more difficult” by massive outflows from the fund.

At its peak, the fund managed £10.2 billion of assets, but according to financial services and research firm Morningstar, that had shrunk to just £3.7 billion as of the end of May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, britains, trading, stockpicker, suspension, investment, youtube, best, apology, suspend, known, firm, million, billion, fund, video, posts, woodford, flagship


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YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment

Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com. YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” b


Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com. YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” b
YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, crowder, content, violate, blogger, user, tweeted, youtube, videos, harassment, crowders, accused, video, company, saying, flipflops


YouTube flip-flops on suspending video blogger accused of harassment

YouTube has suspended the monetization of a popular user, Steven Crowder, for “a pattern of egregious actions that has harmed the broader community” — only hours after defending it.

The flip-flop shows how Google-owned YouTube struggles to define and enforce clear standards for content on its platform, as it faces pressure from lawmakers and the public to remove hateful content and misinformation.

Parent company Alphabet reported a slowdown in ad revenue growth in Q1, which some analysts believed was partly a result of algorithm changes meant to reduce the prominence of harmful content on YouTube.

Vox.com producer Carlos Maza, who identifies as gay, initially complained to YouTube on June 1, saying that Crowder, a popular YouTube user, made homophobic and racial slurs toward him in his videos. Crowder, whose account has 3.84 million subscribers, earns an estimated annual revenue of $81,000 from YouTube, according to social analytics company SocialBlade.com.

YouTube responded Tuesday, saying that after a four-day long “in-depth investigation” it determined Crowder’s videos were “hurtful” but didn’t violate any of the platform’s policies.

Maza became the target of more harassment as a result of that decision, he told CNBC.com, adding that death threats from Crowder supporters had increased since Tuesday night.

Wednesday morning, the company announced a new anti-harassment policy that will crack down on users and accounts that express supremacy over other groups. However, Crowder’s videos remained available and YouTube continued to tell CNBC that they didn’t violate the policies.

Two hours later, the company publicly tweeted at Maza, saying it had decided to suspend Crowder’s monetization after all.

Adding to the confusion, YouTube then tweeted that Crowder had to stop selling t-shirts with offensive messages on them in order to be reinstated.

It then clarified later that Crowder would also have to address other problems, as well, in order to be reinstated.

YouTube declined to provide a statement on the flip-flop.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-05  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suspending, crowder, content, violate, blogger, user, tweeted, youtube, videos, harassment, crowders, accused, video, company, saying, flipflops


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YouTube recommended videos of underage girls after users watched erotic videos, research finds

In the aftermath of the discovery earlier this year that pedophiles had infiltrated comment sections of YouTube videos with children, the Google-owned video platform disabled comments on many videos of children. But researchers say disturbing patterns remain: A New York Times report published Monday said watching erotic videos and following the platform’s recommendations can eventually lead to videos of children. They said users who watched erotic videos might be recommended videos of women dres


In the aftermath of the discovery earlier this year that pedophiles had infiltrated comment sections of YouTube videos with children, the Google-owned video platform disabled comments on many videos of children. But researchers say disturbing patterns remain: A New York Times report published Monday said watching erotic videos and following the platform’s recommendations can eventually lead to videos of children. They said users who watched erotic videos might be recommended videos of women dres
YouTube recommended videos of underage girls after users watched erotic videos, research finds Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, report, york, watched, children, changes, erotic, youtube, times, minors, finds, recommended, youtubes, research, underage, girls, users, recommendations


YouTube recommended videos of underage girls after users watched erotic videos, research finds

In the aftermath of the discovery earlier this year that pedophiles had infiltrated comment sections of YouTube videos with children, the Google-owned video platform disabled comments on many videos of children.

But researchers say disturbing patterns remain: A New York Times report published Monday said watching erotic videos and following the platform’s recommendations can eventually lead to videos of children.

The researchers at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University were examining YouTube’s impact in Brazil. They said users who watched erotic videos might be recommended videos of women dressing as young girls, and eventually may be recommended videos of “girls as young as 5 or 6” wearing bathing suits or getting dressed, the report said.

According to the report, YouTube’s recommendation system changed to no longer link some of the revealing videos together, but the company told The New York Times it was “probably a result of routine tweaks to its algorithms, rather than a deliberate policy change.” YouTube also said that turning off its recommendation system on videos of children would “hurt ‘creators’ who rely on those clicks” but did say it would limit recommendations on videos it deems putting children at risk, the report said.

A YouTube spokesperson pointed to a blog post published Monday titled “An update on our efforts to protect minors and families.”

The post outlined some changes made in recent months, along with newer changes, which include limiting recommendations of “videos featuring minors in risky situations.” YouTube has also made changes to its machine learning classifier, which it said will help make it better identify videos that put minors at risk.

Read the New York Times report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, videos, report, york, watched, children, changes, erotic, youtube, times, minors, finds, recommended, youtubes, research, underage, girls, users, recommendations


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Google services restored after outage made YouTube, Gmail and other apps unavailable

Silhouettes of people holding laptops are seen in front of the logo of ‘Google’ technology company. Services such as YouTube, Gmail and Snapchat, which use Google’s technology, were restored Sunday around 7 p.m. ET (4 p.m. PT) after experiencing several hours of outage that appeared contained only to parts of the United States. Google had said it was experiencing high levels of network congestion in eastern U.S., which affected multiple services in Google Cloud, G Suite and YouTube. Apple, which


Silhouettes of people holding laptops are seen in front of the logo of ‘Google’ technology company. Services such as YouTube, Gmail and Snapchat, which use Google’s technology, were restored Sunday around 7 p.m. ET (4 p.m. PT) after experiencing several hours of outage that appeared contained only to parts of the United States. Google had said it was experiencing high levels of network congestion in eastern U.S., which affected multiple services in Google Cloud, G Suite and YouTube. Apple, which
Google services restored after outage made YouTube, Gmail and other apps unavailable Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-02  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, services, apps, youtube, technology, unable, restored, outage, google, report, experiencing, reporting, gmail, unavailable


Google services restored after outage made YouTube, Gmail and other apps unavailable

Silhouettes of people holding laptops are seen in front of the logo of ‘Google’ technology company.

Services such as YouTube, Gmail and Snapchat, which use Google’s technology, were restored Sunday around 7 p.m. ET (4 p.m. PT) after experiencing several hours of outage that appeared contained only to parts of the United States.

Google had said it was experiencing high levels of network congestion in eastern U.S., which affected multiple services in Google Cloud, G Suite and YouTube. Apple, which uses Google Cloud for some of its services, was also reporting issues with applications ranging from iMessage to iCloud.

The exact cause of the outage is not immediately known.

“We will conduct an internal investigation of this issue and make appropriate improvements to our systems to help prevent or minimize future recurrence,” Google said. “We will provide a detailed report of this incident once we have completed our internal investigation.”

The incident began at about 12:25 p.m. PT. Users began reporting that they were unable to access certain services.

Snapchat said it was aware that some users were unable to use the app.

Users took to Twitter to report that YouTube was also experiencing issues.

There were also numerous complaints that Gmail was not functioning.

Last October, YouTube experienced a major outage around the world.

— CNBC’s Saheli Roy Choudhury contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-02  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, services, apps, youtube, technology, unable, restored, outage, google, report, experiencing, reporting, gmail, unavailable


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In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies and fake news on the internet

So it’s not shocking that in 1995 Gates would be asked for his predictions on what the internet might look like a couple of decades into the future. Streaming moviesOne prediction that Gates nailed was that the internet would forever change the way we consume entertainment, like movies and television shows. In the interview, Pratchett is astounded when Gates tells him that “VCRs will be obsolete within ten years.” In other words, Gates is describing our ability to watch movies, TV shows and othe


So it’s not shocking that in 1995 Gates would be asked for his predictions on what the internet might look like a couple of decades into the future. Streaming moviesOne prediction that Gates nailed was that the internet would forever change the way we consume entertainment, like movies and television shows. In the interview, Pratchett is astounded when Gates tells him that “VCRs will be obsolete within ten years.” In other words, Gates is describing our ability to watch movies, TV shows and othe
In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies and fake news on the internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, internet, pratchett, interview, youtube, today, video, fake, gates, streaming, predictions, bill, misinformation, online, 1995, movies


In 1995, Bill Gates made these predictions about streaming movies and fake news on the internet

Today, pretty much everyone regularly uses the internet to read breaking news and stream the latest blockbuster films. But in 1995, the internet was still in its infancy, and many Americans weren’t even online yet. Bill Gates — as the co-founder of Microsoft (which made Internet Explorer, one of the first web browsers) — likely knew as much about the potential of internet technology as anyone in the mid-90s, however. So it’s not shocking that in 1995 Gates would be asked for his predictions on what the internet might look like a couple of decades into the future. That’s exactly what happened when Gates sat down with author and journalist Terry Pratchett for an interview that appeared in the July 1995 edition of GQ magazine’s UK version. At the time, Gates was 39 and the world’s richest person with a net worth of $12.9 billion (he’s now second to Jeff Bezo with a $99.6 billion net worth, according to Forbes). Gates’ conversation with Pratchett recently resurfaced online when writer Marc Burrows, who is working on a biography of Pratchett, tweeted two screenshots of the magazine interview (Gates is identified in the interview screenshots as “BG” and Pratchett is “TP”). Not surprisingly, Gates had a couple of predictions for the future of the internet — one of which would turn out to be eerily prescient, while the other one seems to have come up short.

Streaming movies

One prediction that Gates nailed was that the internet would forever change the way we consume entertainment, like movies and television shows. At the time, most people’s idea of a home entertainment system was a television hooked up to a VCR (electronic devices that played VHS tapes for anyone too young to remember), though video discs like DVDs were beginning to be introduced by the mid-90s. In the interview, Pratchett is astounded when Gates tells him that “VCRs will be obsolete within ten years.” “What? Completely obsolete?” asks Pratchett, who then asks if discs will be the primary home video format. “Oh, they’ll be replaced by a disc player within four or five years,” Gates says. “I’m talking about access to media across the network.” In other words, Gates is describing our ability to watch movies, TV shows and other streaming videos online. Gates, who complained that VCRs had “the world’s worst user interface,” went on to explain: “Everything we’re talking about will have screens to guide you and when you pause there’ll be a built-in personality that’ll immediately jump in and help you.” Gates’ prediction ended up being pretty much on the money, as online video technology continued to improve over the next decade to the point where the now-ubiquitous video streaming platform YouTube was founded in 2005, 10 years after this interview took place. In 2007, Netflix announced plans to start streaming full movies and shows online. Today, Netflix has nearly 150 million streaming subscribers around the world, while more than two billion people watch videos on YouTube every month.

What about fake news?

Pratchett also wanted to know if Gates thought that the internet would eventually make it easier to spread misinformation to large groups of people. “There’s a kind of parity of esteem of information on the Net,” Pratchett remarked to Gates in the interview. “It’s all there: there’s no way of finding out whether this stuff has any bottom to it or whether someone just made it up.” As an example, Pratchett proposed a hypothetical situation where someone purporting to be an expert promoted a theory online claiming that the Holocaust never happened. That theory, Pratchett argued, could be propped up on the internet and “available on the same terms as any piece of historical research which has undergone peer review and so on.” While Pratchett’s biographer, Burrows, argued on Twitter this week that Pratchett had “accurately predicted how the internet would propagate and legitimise fake news,” Gates’ response is worth noting for the fact that the Microsoft co-founder failed to foresee the same negative effects of online misinformation. Gates agreed with Pratchett that misinformation could be spread online, but “not for long,” the billionaire reasoned. For instance, Gates argued, the internet could contain fake news, but it would also create more opportunities for information to be verified and supported by appropriate authorities, from actual experts to journalists and consumer reports. “The whole way that you can check somebody’s reputation will be so much more sophisticated on the Net than it is in print today,” Gates tells Pratchett. Of course, we know now that many online platforms — from social media sites like Facebook to online video sites like YouTube — have struggled to squash the spread of misinformation and fake news on the internet. Even Gates himself says today that he’s concerned about the spread of misinformation online, admitting that “it’s turned out to be more of a problem than I, or many others, would have expected.” But Gates also said, in a 2018 interview with Quartz, that he remains optimistic that the internet will continue to become more sophisticated as an information source over time, and that the benefits of having access to such a wealth of information on the internet will eventually outweigh the “challenges” of separating fact from fiction online. Don’t Miss: What Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates was doing at 20 years old In 1985, Steve Jobs made these eerily accurate predictions about the future of tech Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, internet, pratchett, interview, youtube, today, video, fake, gates, streaming, predictions, bill, misinformation, online, 1995, movies


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Amazon removes books promoting dangerous bleach ‘cures’ for autism and other conditions

Amazon has removed more than a dozen books that unscientifically claim a homemade bleach, chlorine dioxide, can cure conditions ranging from malaria to childhood autism. The books include directions for making and ingesting the concoction, which doctors and federal regulators have warned is dangerous. Anti-vaccination advocate Andreas Kalcker’s “Forbidden Health,” which promotes chlorine dioxide as an autism cure, was also removed. In March, after a critical report in Wired, Amazon banned two au


Amazon has removed more than a dozen books that unscientifically claim a homemade bleach, chlorine dioxide, can cure conditions ranging from malaria to childhood autism. The books include directions for making and ingesting the concoction, which doctors and federal regulators have warned is dangerous. Anti-vaccination advocate Andreas Kalcker’s “Forbidden Health,” which promotes chlorine dioxide as an autism cure, was also removed. In March, after a critical report in Wired, Amazon banned two au
Amazon removes books promoting dangerous bleach ‘cures’ for autism and other conditions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: brandy zadrozny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, youtube, cures, dangerous, books, bleach, mms, removes, dioxide, promoting, cure, chlorine, conditions, autism, amazon


Amazon removes books promoting dangerous bleach 'cures' for autism and other conditions

Amazon has removed more than a dozen books that unscientifically claim a homemade bleach, chlorine dioxide, can cure conditions ranging from malaria to childhood autism. The books include directions for making and ingesting the concoction, which doctors and federal regulators have warned is dangerous.

Amazon confirmed Tuesday that it was no longer selling the books on the topic of chlorine dioxide — a hazardous mix of sodium chlorite and an acid activator such as citric acid, also marketed as Miracle Mineral Solution, or MMS. The Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers that the so-called cure amounts to industrial bleach, has no possible health benefits and can cause permanent harm.

The shelved titles include “MMS Health Recovery Guidebook” and “Introducing MMS,” both written by Jim Humble, a former Scientologist and the self-appointed archbishop of a religion devoted to chlorine dioxide. For years, he has claimed the bleach could cure AIDS, cancer, diabetes and almost every other disease. NBC News was unable to reach Humble for comment.

Anti-vaccination advocate Andreas Kalcker’s “Forbidden Health,” which promotes chlorine dioxide as an autism cure, was also removed. Kalcker did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The move comes a week after an NBC News report on parents who use chlorine dioxide in a misinformed effort to reverse their children’s autism, a developmental disorder with no known cure.

In March, after a critical report in Wired, Amazon banned two autism “cure” books, which included Kerri Rivera’s “Healing the Symptoms Known as Autism,” a guide in which she introduced Humble’s bleach recipe to parents of autistic children.

Amazon, Facebook and YouTube have scrambled in recent months to answer calls from lawmakers and public health advocates to curtail the spread of anti-vaccination and other health misinformation on their sites. In April, Facebook deleted several chlorine dioxide pages and groups with thousands of members, citing a policy against content that promotes illegal drugs. That same month, YouTube deleted scores of videos and channels with millions of views dedicated to chlorine dioxide, explaining that they violated standards against “content intended to encourage dangerous activities that have an inherent risk of physical harm.”

A spokesman for Amazon declined to provide details on Tuesday’s takedown, or whether it may be part of a larger effort to clean up health misinformation on its marketplace.

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Watch: An analyst explains why he says Amazon’s stock will hit $3,000 in a few years


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: brandy zadrozny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, youtube, cures, dangerous, books, bleach, mms, removes, dioxide, promoting, cure, chlorine, conditions, autism, amazon


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Facebook says the doctored Nancy Pelosi video used to question her mental state and viewed millions of times will stay up

Facebook has decided to keep an altered video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on its site that makes her speech appear slow and slurred, The Guardian reported Friday. Commenters, including President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, have used the video to call into question Pelosi’s competence and mental state. In a since-deleted tweet, Giuliani shared a link to the altered video and wrote, “What is wrong with Nancy Pelosi? Versions of the altered video could still be foun


Facebook has decided to keep an altered video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on its site that makes her speech appear slow and slurred, The Guardian reported Friday. Commenters, including President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, have used the video to call into question Pelosi’s competence and mental state. In a since-deleted tweet, Giuliani shared a link to the altered video and wrote, “What is wrong with Nancy Pelosi? Versions of the altered video could still be foun
Facebook says the doctored Nancy Pelosi video used to question her mental state and viewed millions of times will stay up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, twitter, speech, post, pelosi, facebook, used, youtube, policies, question, videos, viewed, stay, altered, video, nancy, millions, state


Facebook says the doctored Nancy Pelosi video used to question her mental state and viewed millions of times will stay up

Facebook has decided to keep an altered video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on its site that makes her speech appear slow and slurred, The Guardian reported Friday. Commenters, including President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, have used the video to call into question Pelosi’s competence and mental state.

In a since-deleted tweet, Giuliani shared a link to the altered video and wrote, “What is wrong with Nancy Pelosi? Her speech pattern is bizarre.” Giuliani later appeared to apologize on Twitter for sharing the video.

Experts told The Washington Post that the video, which is taken from Pelosi’s appearance at a Center for American Progress event, appears to have been slowed down to about 75% of its original speed and modified for pitch. The alteration gives Pelosi an unnaturally slow, slurred speech pattern, which made several commenters wonder if she was drunk during the talk.

In a statement to the Guardian, a Facebook spokesperson said, “There’s a tension here: we work hard to find the right balance between encouraging free expression and promoting a safe and authentic community, and we believe that reducing the distribution of inauthentic content strikes that balance. But just because something is allowed to be on Facebook doesn’t mean it should get distribution. In other words, we allow people to post it as a form of expression, but we’re not going to show it at the top of News Feed.”

As of Friday, an altered version of the video remained on the Facebook page Politics WatchDog and had been viewed more than 2 million times.

Facebook did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Versions of the altered video could still be found on Twitter Friday as well. One user posted the altered video with the comment, “Please come get your drunk grandma @AOC #pelosi,” and the video had been viewed over 400 times. Twitter declined to comment.

Meanwhile, Google-owned YouTube removed the video from its platform, apparently determining the alteration did go too far. Like Facebook, YouTube has also suffered its share of criticism in the past for continuing to host content that walks the line of its policies.

“YouTube has clear policies that outline what content is not acceptable to post and we remove videos violating these policies when flagged to us,” a YouTube spokesperson said in a statement to CNBC. “These videos violated our policies and have been removed. They also did not surface prominently. In fact, search results and watch next panels about Nancy Pelosi include videos from authoritative sources, usually at the top.”

The video has drawn attention to the potential dangers of new technology that enables convincing alterations. Even though experts believe simple aspects like pitch and speed were changed in the Pelosi video, so-called deepfake technology uses artificial intelligence to modify videos even further. With the ability to mimic facial expressions, the possibilities for spreading misinformation could greatly expand.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, twitter, speech, post, pelosi, facebook, used, youtube, policies, question, videos, viewed, stay, altered, video, nancy, millions, state


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