McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EU

McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EURoger McNamee of Elevation Partners joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the latest dispute between the European Union and Facebook.


McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EURoger McNamee of Elevation Partners joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the latest dispute between the European Union and Facebook.
McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EU Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, european, squawk, best, joins, facebook, zuckerberg, euroger, union, mcnamee, latest, concede


McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EU

McNamee: It would be best for Zuckerberg to concede something to EU

Roger McNamee of Elevation Partners joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the latest dispute between the European Union and Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-18
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, partners, european, squawk, best, joins, facebook, zuckerberg, euroger, union, mcnamee, latest, concede


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Facebook’s Zuckerberg meets EU’s competition chief ahead of new A.I. rules

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is meeting Europe’s competition chief in Brussels Monday, at a time when regulators in the region are preparing new rules that could impact the social network’s business. The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, is due to unveil new regulations on artificial intelligence (AI) Wednesday. Zuckerberg’s visit also happens at a time when European regulators are assessing whether Facebook’s data practices have disrespected competition law. Margrethe Vestager, the E


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is meeting Europe’s competition chief in Brussels Monday, at a time when regulators in the region are preparing new rules that could impact the social network’s business.
The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, is due to unveil new regulations on artificial intelligence (AI) Wednesday.
Zuckerberg’s visit also happens at a time when European regulators are assessing whether Facebook’s data practices have disrespected competition law.
Margrethe Vestager, the E
Facebook’s Zuckerberg meets EU’s competition chief ahead of new A.I. rules Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, eus, regulators, ahead, data, meets, chief, facebooks, competition, facebook, rules, european, meeting


Facebook's Zuckerberg meets EU's competition chief ahead of new A.I. rules

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is meeting Europe’s competition chief in Brussels Monday, at a time when regulators in the region are preparing new rules that could impact the social network’s business.

The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, is due to unveil new regulations on artificial intelligence (AI) Wednesday. Media reports suggest the EU could go as far as a temporary ban on the use of facial recognition. Facebook is one of many U.S. tech giants that have invested in A.I. Zuckerberg’s firm recently bought the British A.I. company Deeptide and the London-based computer vision start-up Scape Technologies.

Zuckerberg’s visit also happens at a time when European regulators are assessing whether Facebook’s data practices have disrespected competition law. Margrethe Vestager, the EU’s competition chief, is also looking at Google and Amazon data use in separate probes.

A Facebook spokesperson told CNBC Monday that Zuckerberg is meeting “with European decision-makers in Brussels to discuss a framework for new rules and regulation for the internet.” Shares of Facebook are up by about 30% over the last 12 months.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-17  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, eus, regulators, ahead, data, meets, chief, facebooks, competition, facebook, rules, european, meeting


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Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook’s focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it’s changed how people use the site

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California. Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own. Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker. Photo courtesy of Dino SkrijeljBrands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans. Members of the Facebook grou


Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California.
Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own.
Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker.
Photo courtesy of Dino SkrijeljBrands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans.
Members of the Facebook grou
Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook’s focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it’s changed how people use the site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, group, company, social, changed, site, soundboks, tickets, zuckerberg, facebooks, 2016, groups, mark, election, users, shifted, focus, meaningful, facebook


Mark Zuckerberg shifted Facebook's focus to groups after the 2016 election, and it's changed how people use the site

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California. Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Dennis Neymit, a 25-year-old San Francisco chemical engineer, had been trying to sell his tickets to an electro pop concert for a few days with no luck, so finally he decided to give them away. “Giving away my 2 tix to TENDER at GAMH tonight!” Neymit posted in a private Facebook group called Clever Girls, where more than 11,600 Bay Area music fans share songs, news, raptor memes and concert tickets with each other. “I can’t make it anymore but hope two of y’all can enjoy their beatz and emotionz,” Neymit posted, along with screenshots of his tickets and their QR codes. The tickets were soon claimed. “It made me feel better just knowing that someone else had a good time,” Neymit said Neymit’s use of Facebook reflects a shift in how many people are now experiencing the social network. Whereas years ago people’s News Feeds were littered with auto-playing videos, news articles both real and fake, and nonsensical gibberish from their racist uncles or high school acquaintances, Facebook is now placing more emphasis on content from groups that users join.

“Clever girls” is a popular, music-focused Bay Area Facebook group that was started by a Facebook user known as “Concert Raptor” who wanted to bring people together and give away tickets to shows. Courtesy of Ari the Raptor

Since 2017, Facebook has dealt with the fallout from Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the Cambridge Analytica scandal in 2018 and the launch of four separate antitrust-focused investigations into the company in 2019. Yet despite those obstacles and significant negative press coverage, Facebook usage has continued to grow, climbing from 1.86 billion monthly users in February 2017 to 2.5 billion monthly users in December. Although Facebook does not share detailed statistics about how users are spending time on the site, groups give people a new reason to check the site regularly. In April 2019, Facebook said that there were more than 400 million people in groups that they find meaningful. (The company determines “meaningful” through surveys and by seeing how they engage in those groups, such as whether they have friends there and how much they interact with people in them.) “The growth in focus on groups is strategic and well designed,” said Daniel Newman, principal analyst at Futurum Research, which focuses on digital technology. “It’s keeping users on the site longer and providing rich, harvestable data for Facebook and its advertisers.” Users seem to love it as well. “Facebook groups are a great way for people to customize their social media experience by connecting with other people with similar interests and needs,” said Hugo Cesar, who is an admin of “Bay Area Conscious Community Housing Board” a group that is used by more than 71,600 users to find housing in the San Francisco Bay Area.

‘Meaningful communities’

Facebook began shift its emphasis away from the News Feed and toward groups following the 2016 U.S. presidential election. At the time, the company was under fire for not doing more to prevent the spread of fake news and misinformation. As part of its response, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg published a 6,000-word note in February 2017 outlining how the social network would improve by focusing on supporting and creating safe communities. Zuckerberg noted that more than 100 million users were members of “very meaningful” Facebook groups, but he said that most people don’t seek out groups on their own. “There is a real opportunity to connect more of us with groups that will be meaningful social infrastructure in our lives,” Zuckerberg wrote at the time. “If we can improve our suggestions and help connect one billion people with meaningful communities, that can strengthen our social fabric.” Since then, Facebook has made strides to emphasize groups, showing content from them more often in users’ timelines and using marketing to promote groups, including paying an estimated $10 million to run a 60-second commercial during Super Bowl LIV. “Whatever you rock, there’s a Facebook Group for you,” the company said in the ad, which showcased numerous groups, including a rock climbing group and another focused on rock collecting. There’s no limit to the focus of these groups. There are groups dedicated to helping people find housing, others focused on niche interests like craft beer, groups that serve specific communities like army veterans, and groups focused on women in the trucking industry. “It is the new, modern-day AOL Chatroom organized by topics and interests,” said Crystal Aminzadeh, an admin of the group “Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley & Tanya Rad” which is for fans of the podcast of the same name. The group counts more than 27,000 members. “It brings together people from all walks of life who may have just that one interest in common. In this case they share a common love for this podcast,” Aminzadeh said.

Members of Soundboks Facebook groups often post photos of themselves with their beloved speaker. Photo courtesy of Dino Skrijelj

Brands can use Facebook groups to engage with fans. For example, Soundboks is a Danish company that makes a popular Bluetooth speaker. The company uses multiple Facebook groups to post announcements while fans use it to discuss different ways to accessorize the speakers, post videos of their Soundboks in action or compare the Soundboks to other speakers. Since Soundboks is still a young company, it also relies on people in its groups to showcase the company’s speakers to potential customers. “It really drives a lot people to purchase when they see this active community,” said Collin Burdette, Soundboks direct community support coordinator. “Seeing negative things, seeing positive things — we’re not trying to censor that.”

So much depends on admins

Running these groups is no easy task. Group admins and moderators who spoke with CNBC said their efforts can easily take up 8 hours or more of their week. These users pore through red notifications on their Facebook tabs from users who have requested approval to join the groups or reports from group members who have flagged content as spam, harassment or simply off topic and breaking group rules, among other things. Facebook has given these users more tools to better run their groups. For example, admins of private groups can set up membership approval forms, requiring applicants to answer a few simple questions that can be used to filter out any bots or unwanted users. “Before I was an admin, there used to be a lot of bots and trolls,” Aminzadeh said. “I added the questions for members who requested to join and they’d have to answer them. The questions were specific to the podcast so listeners would only be able to answer.”

Members of the Facebook group “Scrubbing In with Becca Tilley & Tanya Rad” at a meet-up in Los Angeles at the People’s Choice Awards in October 2019. Photo courtesy of Crystal Aminzadeh


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-16  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, group, company, social, changed, site, soundboks, tickets, zuckerberg, facebooks, 2016, groups, mark, election, users, shifted, focus, meaningful, facebook


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Microsoft president says big tech has ‘fundamental responsibility’ to protect US voting process

MUNICH — As America prepares for the 2020 presidential election, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith said tech companies have a ‘fundamental responsibility’ to safeguard America’s democratic process. “We have a fundamental responsibility as companies and as a technology sector to help protect our candidates from attacks and hacking. To help protect the integrity of voting, from voting polls to voting results and certainly the voting process itself,” Smith explained at the annu


MUNICH — As America prepares for the 2020 presidential election, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith said tech companies have a ‘fundamental responsibility’ to safeguard America’s democratic process.
“We have a fundamental responsibility as companies and as a technology sector to help protect our candidates from attacks and hacking.
To help protect the integrity of voting, from voting polls to voting results and certainly the voting process itself,” Smith explained at the annu
Microsoft president says big tech has ‘fundamental responsibility’ to protect US voting process Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, responsibility, microsoft, big, going, zuckerberg, voting, fundamental, process, protect, think, president, security, munich, tech, companies, regulation


Microsoft president says big tech has 'fundamental responsibility' to protect US voting process

MUNICH — As America prepares for the 2020 presidential election, Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith said tech companies have a ‘fundamental responsibility’ to safeguard America’s democratic process.

“We have a fundamental responsibility as companies and as a technology sector to help protect our candidates from attacks and hacking. To help protect the integrity of voting, from voting polls to voting results and certainly the voting process itself,” Smith explained at the annual Munich Security Conference.

“We have a fundamental responsibility not just to address but to fight disinformation and I think we have a fundamental responsibility to ensure that our business models do not sap the strength of democracy itself by creating polarized communities that eat away at the core of what makes every democracy successful,” he added.

Smith’s comments Saturday at the security forum followed those of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who said that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content.

“Even if I’m not going to agree with every regulation in the near term, I do think it’s going to be the thing that helps create trust and better governance of the internet and will benefit everyone, including us over the long term,” Zuckerberg told an audience Saturday at the Munich Security Conference.

“In the absence of that kind of regulation, we will continue doing our best, we are going to build up the muscle to do it, to basically find stuff as proactively as possible,” he said, adding that he did not want Facebook to contribute to polarization or misinformation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, responsibility, microsoft, big, going, zuckerberg, voting, fundamental, process, protect, think, president, security, munich, tech, companies, regulation


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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content

MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content. “To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum. The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day. While in Europe, Zuckerberg is


MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content.
“To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum.
The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day.
While in Europe, Zuckerberg is
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, going, online, ceo, social, users, term, tech, security, mark, munich, facebook, content, regulation, calls


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg calls for more regulation of online content

MUNICH — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Saturday that social media companies need more guidance and regulation from governments in order to tackle the growing problem of harmful online content.

“Even if I’m not going to agree with every regulation in the near term, I do think it’s going to be the thing that helps creates trust and better governance of the internet and will benefit everyone, including us over the long term,” Zuckerberg told an audience at the Munich Security Conference.

“In the absence of that kind of regulation, we will continue doing our best, we are going to build up the muscle to do it, to basically find stuff as proactively as possible,” he said, adding that he did not want Facebook to contribute to polarization or misinformation.

“To the contrary, I want us to be a force for bringing people closer together,” he said at the annual security forum.

Facebook has dealt with a number of headaches over the past few years. The company had to overcome the fallout from Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, 2018’s Cambridge Analytica scandal and the launch of four separate antitrust-focused investigations in the U.S. into the company in 2019.

The tech boss said he now employs 35,000 people to review online content and that his teams currently suspend more than a million fake accounts each day. The social media giant has previously said that the number of users continues to grow, claiming 2.9 billion monthly users across its family of apps.

While in Europe, Zuckerberg is expected to take meetings with European politicians in Munich and Brussels to discuss data practices, regulation and tax reform.

“My goal for this next decade isn’t to be liked, but to be understood,” Zuckerberg said on the company’s earnings call in January.

Zuckerberg also spoke at the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit 2020 in Salt Lake City, Utah, earlier this month, saying that he expects the company’s new honesty-first approach is “going to piss off a lot of people.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-15  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zuckerberg, going, online, ceo, social, users, term, tech, security, mark, munich, facebook, content, regulation, calls


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Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg’s comments are perplexing

Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg’s comments are perplexingCNBC contributor Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss new comments from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on changing policies.


Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg’s comments are perplexingCNBC contributor Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss new comments from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on changing policies.
Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg’s comments are perplexing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swisher, kara, zuckerberg, comments, policies, perplexing, mark, squawk, perplexingcnbc, joins, zuckerbergs


Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg's comments are perplexing

Kara Swisher: Mark Zuckerberg’s comments are perplexing

CNBC contributor Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss new comments from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on changing policies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swisher, kara, zuckerberg, comments, policies, perplexing, mark, squawk, perplexingcnbc, joins, zuckerbergs


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Dropbox CEO Drew Houston joins Facebook’s board of directors

Dropbox CEO Drew Houston is joining Facebook’s board of the directors, the company said Monday. Mark Zuckerberg is a friend of Houston’s, attending his birthday party in 2017. Houston said in a statement that he looks forward to working with Zuckerberg and the rest of Facebook’s board “on the many opportunities and challenges ahead.” The move comes after Netflix CEO Reed Hastings left Facebook’s board last April, after serving on the board for eight years. Houston is the eighth member of Faceboo


Dropbox CEO Drew Houston is joining Facebook’s board of the directors, the company said Monday.
Mark Zuckerberg is a friend of Houston’s, attending his birthday party in 2017.
Houston said in a statement that he looks forward to working with Zuckerberg and the rest of Facebook’s board “on the many opportunities and challenges ahead.”
The move comes after Netflix CEO Reed Hastings left Facebook’s board last April, after serving on the board for eight years.
Houston is the eighth member of Faceboo
Dropbox CEO Drew Houston joins Facebook’s board of directors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, mark, joins, zuckerberg, statement, dropbox, board, services, facebooks, president, technology, drew, ceo, houston, directors


Dropbox CEO Drew Houston joins Facebook's board of directors

Dropbox CEO Drew Houston is joining Facebook’s board of the directors, the company said Monday.

Houston co-founded Dropbox in 2007 alongside fellow MIT student Arash Ferdowsi. Mark Zuckerberg is a friend of Houston’s, attending his birthday party in 2017.

“Drew brings valuable perspective to our board as a leader of a technology company with services used by millions of people and businesses,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement. “He thinks deeply about where technology is going and how to build a culture that delivers services that always work well.”

Houston said in a statement that he looks forward to working with Zuckerberg and the rest of Facebook’s board “on the many opportunities and challenges ahead.”

The move comes after Netflix CEO Reed Hastings left Facebook’s board last April, after serving on the board for eight years. The company also appointed Peggy Alford, PayPal’s senior vice president of core markets, to replace Erskine Bowles, president emeritus of University of North Carolina, on the board.

Houston is the eighth member of Facebook’s board. There are now six male directors sitting on the board and two females – Alford and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-03  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, mark, joins, zuckerberg, statement, dropbox, board, services, facebooks, president, technology, drew, ceo, houston, directors


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Facebook refutes Soros claim of a ‘special relationship’ between Trump and Zuckerberg

Facebook on Friday issued a statement renouncing recent allegations by liberal financier George Soros that there is a “special relationship” forming between the social media company and President Donald Trump. “While we respect Mr. Soros’ right to voice his opinion, he’s wrong,” a spokesman for Facebook said. He continued, “Facebook will help President Trump to get re-elected and Mr. Trump will, in turn, defend Facebook against attacks from regulators and the media.” In his piece, Soros highligh


Facebook on Friday issued a statement renouncing recent allegations by liberal financier George Soros that there is a “special relationship” forming between the social media company and President Donald Trump.
“While we respect Mr. Soros’ right to voice his opinion, he’s wrong,” a spokesman for Facebook said.
He continued, “Facebook will help President Trump to get re-elected and Mr. Trump will, in turn, defend Facebook against attacks from regulators and the media.”
In his piece, Soros highligh
Facebook refutes Soros claim of a ‘special relationship’ between Trump and Zuckerberg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claim, special, soros, trump, world, refutes, comments, facebook, house, zuckerberg, social, relationship, company


Facebook refutes Soros claim of a 'special relationship' between Trump and Zuckerberg

Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Facebook on Friday issued a statement renouncing recent allegations by liberal financier George Soros that there is a “special relationship” forming between the social media company and President Donald Trump.

“While we respect Mr. Soros’ right to voice his opinion, he’s wrong,” a spokesman for Facebook said. “The notion that we are aligned with any one political figure or party runs counter to our values and the facts. We continue making unprecedented investments to keep our platform safe, fight foreign interference in elections around the world, and combat misinformation.”

The tech company issued the statement following recent comments by Soros alleging that the there is “an informal mutual assistance operation or agreement developing between Trump and Facebook.” Soros made the comments at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, last week, and he followed them up on Friday in an opinion piece on the New York Times.

Soros wrote, “Brad Parscale, the digital director of Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign and now his campaign manager for 2020, said that Facebook helped Mr. Trump and gave him the edge. This seems to have marked the beginning of a special relationship.”

He continued, “Facebook will help President Trump to get re-elected and Mr. Trump will, in turn, defend Facebook against attacks from regulators and the media.”

In his piece, Soros highlighted a September 2019 White House meeting between Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Trump. Soros also wrote that neither Zuckerberg nor Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg should be left in control of the social media company.

“They follow only one guiding principle: maximize profits irrespective of the consequences,” Soros wrote.

The spat between the social network and Soros goes back to the 2018 World Economic Forum, where Soros said Facebook and Google were menaces and had become “powerful monopolies.” Following those comments, Facebook reportedly worked with a Washington-based public relations firm called Definers Public Affairs to press reporters to explore Soros’ financial connections with groups that protested the company.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, claim, special, soros, trump, world, refutes, comments, facebook, house, zuckerberg, social, relationship, company


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Zuckerberg: Our new honesty-first approach is ‘going to piss off a lot of people’

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday said the social media company is going to stand for principles it believes in whether or not people like it. “This is the new approach, and I think it’s going to piss off a lot of people,” said Zuckerberg, speaking at Silicon Slopes Tech Summit 2020 in Salt Lake City, Utah. “But frankly the old approach was pissing off a lot of peopl


Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday said the social media company is going to stand for principles it believes in whether or not people like it.
“This is the new approach, and I think it’s going to piss off a lot of people,” said Zuckerberg, speaking at Silicon Slopes Tech Summit 2020 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
“But frankly the old approach was pissing off a lot of peopl
Zuckerberg: Our new honesty-first approach is ‘going to piss off a lot of people’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lot, mark, zuckerberg, try, approach, think, ceo, honestyfirst, going, facebook, piss, utahbut


Zuckerberg: Our new honesty-first approach is 'going to piss off a lot of people'

Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the F8 Facebook Developers conference on April 30, 2019 in San Jose, California.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday said the social media company is going to stand for principles it believes in whether or not people like it.

“This is the new approach, and I think it’s going to piss off a lot of people,” said Zuckerberg, speaking at Silicon Slopes Tech Summit 2020 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

“But frankly the old approach was pissing off a lot of people too, so let’s try something different.”

Specifically, Zuckerberg said Facebook is going to support free speech and enable strong encryption on its services.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-31  Authors: salvador rodriguez
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lot, mark, zuckerberg, try, approach, think, ceo, honestyfirst, going, facebook, piss, utahbut


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Here’s what every major analyst had to say about Facebook’s disappointing earnings report

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks to meetings for technology regulations and social media issues on September 19, 2019, in Capitol Hill, Washington, DC. The Facebook earnings report wasn’t quite what Wall Street analysts had hoped for. Many analysts cited slower growth in certain markets as well as increasing regulation for the less-than-stellar report. Others said they still liked the stock but want more information from the company. Here’s what else analysts say about Facebook’s earnings repo


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks to meetings for technology regulations and social media issues on September 19, 2019, in Capitol Hill, Washington, DC.
The Facebook earnings report wasn’t quite what Wall Street analysts had hoped for.
Many analysts cited slower growth in certain markets as well as increasing regulation for the less-than-stellar report.
Others said they still liked the stock but want more information from the company.
Here’s what else analysts say about Facebook’s earnings repo
Here’s what every major analyst had to say about Facebook’s disappointing earnings report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, major, stock, zuckerberg, disappointing, say, earnings, washington, company, report, analysts, wasnt, analyst, facebook, wall, facebooks


Here's what every major analyst had to say about Facebook's disappointing earnings report

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks to meetings for technology regulations and social media issues on September 19, 2019, in Capitol Hill, Washington, DC.

(This story is for CNBC PRO subscribers only.)

The Facebook earnings report wasn’t quite what Wall Street analysts had hoped for.

Many analysts cited slower growth in certain markets as well as increasing regulation for the less-than-stellar report. Others said they still liked the stock but want more information from the company. Facebook also reported a 51% increase in expenses, sending the stock into a tailspin.

Shares of the company plunged more than 7% Thursday.

Here’s what else analysts say about Facebook’s earnings report:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-30  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, major, stock, zuckerberg, disappointing, say, earnings, washington, company, report, analysts, wasnt, analyst, facebook, wall, facebooks


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